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Old 05-20-2008, 01:30 PM   #106
P B G
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Location: Greater Chicago
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Points - which ignition breaker points do you guys purchase locally, looks alot like the one from a Porsche 356, damned near identical, but is it?

I need to get a pair of new ones so I have a good spare and a fresh one with my tune up, and don't want to drive a half out to Barrington.
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Old 05-27-2008, 03:50 PM   #107
wirewrkr
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Depends on which bike you have, the 70-78 bmw uses one set of points, the 79&80 models uses another. The latter is the sames as a VW aircooled performance disributor called the "050"
the sripes on the wire denote a stiffer spring.
I've found the early style on EBAY recently at decent prices and stock up when I can. If you really want to get trick, you can buy a Dyna "booster" which is about $75.00. What it does is turn your points into a mechanical switch for the electonic unit removing the arching from the points, thereby lengthening their life quite a bit. You still have to check the gap and point cam grease occasionally, but well worth the investment.
RV
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Old 05-27-2008, 04:07 PM   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yofisch
hi, anybody know if tthis kymco voltage regulater will work on an bmw r60/6//www.scoot-parts.com/servlet/the-5375/Voltage-regulator-KYMCO-4/Detail
won't work and why would you want spend that much money. any regulator with the same connector in the bottom works peachy, as that regulator fits many, many European cars from the late sixties to the early eighties.
vw bug,bus, type 4, from 74-80\
Porsche 914 maybe 911,
my 69 SAAB 96 even had one
BMW 1602,2002 etcetera and many many more
Robert
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Old 05-28-2008, 06:22 AM   #109
datchew OP
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Updated to include info on vw points from wirewrkr.
Thanks much.
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Old 05-28-2008, 01:17 PM   #110
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/6 rear shocks: replace with shorter shock/springs

I am the proud new owner of a not-so-proud R60/6... the ole girl has not been run for a few years, just stopped using, so you can imagine the carb/fuel/petcock/gastank mess... Anyway, got 'er running with a days work with carb cleaner and new gaskets. Now comes the new-to-me work:

I am, shall I say, "inseam challenged", and the standard seat is a no-go for me. My son and I are doing a little cafe-ing with fenders, gauges, exhausts, etc and plan to build a custom seat and pan. I would like to think that there is a way to lower the rear shocks, maybe an inch or so? The old stock springs/shocks are about 13.5" tall. I have not yet broken them apart, but expect them to be probably sketchy at best, so am thinking of a shorter spring. Does such a thing exist? (I am All Ears?!)
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Old 05-29-2008, 12:18 AM   #111
Wirespokes
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I think the R65 shocks will work on your /6. Not sure, but I think they're an inch or so shorter. If I remember, I could take a measurement tomorrow.
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:26 AM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpeckm
I am the proud new owner of a not-so-proud R60/6... the ole girl has not been run for a few years, just stopped using, so you can imagine the carb/fuel/petcock/gastank mess... Anyway, got 'er running with a days work with carb cleaner and new gaskets. Now comes the new-to-me work:

I am, shall I say, "inseam challenged", and the standard seat is a no-go for me. My son and I are doing a little cafe-ing with fenders, gauges, exhausts, etc and plan to build a custom seat and pan. I would like to think that there is a way to lower the rear shocks, maybe an inch or so? The old stock springs/shocks are about 13.5" tall. I have not yet broken them apart, but expect them to be probably sketchy at best, so am thinking of a shorter spring. Does such a thing exist? (I am All Ears?!)
Seems like if you just put shorter shocks on but with the same travel,tire to fender clearance could be an issue.I put some IKON shocks on mine,they are made in australia and are basically KONI's made by Australians starting when KONI quit making the shocks.Possibly some shorter ones could be ordered from them as they make shocks for all kinds of bikes.
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:29 AM   #113
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Seat?

I saw somewhere a foam and cover kit for a /6 seat and cant find it on a search,this hopefully can be cheaper then buying a 300.00 dollar seat. Thanks,
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Old 06-03-2008, 09:34 AM   #114
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they do fit and will lower the bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tvrla
I think the R65 shocks will work on your /6. Not sure, but I think they're an inch or so shorter. If I remember, I could take a measurement tomorrow.
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Old 06-03-2008, 10:04 AM   #115
bpeckm
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Thanks for the shock info

Quote:
Originally Posted by Foot dragger
Seems like if you just put shorter shocks on but with the same travel,tire to fender clearance could be an issue.
Thanks to all for the info-might be looking for those R65 rear shocks. (How long are the R65 rears?) The fender clearance will not be an issue as there is lots of clearance now, plus we will likely remove the fender, or at least cut it down.
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Old 07-18-2008, 07:48 AM   #116
mandolinut
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coil replacement

Any tips on coil replacement (1.5 ohm) for 1990 r100? I saw the Buell note but was not sure how to modify to fit snug against frame. Has anybody used JCWhitney or motorad? Any other ideas on how to mount an aftermarket coil? Thanks
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Old 07-18-2008, 08:11 AM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mandolinut
Any tips on coil replacement (1.5 ohm) for 1990 r100? I saw the Buell note but was not sure how to modify to fit snug against frame. Has anybody used JCWhitney or motorad? Any other ideas on how to mount an aftermarket coil? Thanks
rick's motorrad sells them, or use the harley coil which is much cheaper. Just zip-tie it to the area you need or fab a frame for it.

the same ones that rick sells are available on ebay often for very little $. You could just buy the bracket from him and then shop ebay.
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Old 07-31-2008, 10:32 PM   #118
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Anyone know of a more affordable source for a replacement front rotor?
R100GS, R100R, Classic-Mystic etc.
Cheers.
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Old 08-01-2008, 10:40 AM   #119
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Rotor

Guzzi ones are the same and just a bit cheaper, (in the UK anyway)
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Old 08-19-2008, 01:20 AM   #120
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Yes this 4 pot setup works very well indeed and the poor performance of the old block and tackle 2 pot brakes is transformed into very acceptable braking power when th bike if fully loaded in touring mode.

I have had my retrofitted 4 pot brembo for 18 months and 25000km and I would not go back to the stock brembo. Its a health and safety issue!

Cheers
Al

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lornce
Not a silly question, Jason. Haven't actually been for a ride yet. It's 4C and raining and I don't want to try it badly enough to suit up for that. Theoretically it ought to work, though.

The larger total piston area of the 4-pot caliper will provide greater resultant force at the pads with lighter, more progressive action at the lever - ie: greater lever travel.

This part bears up in practice: The stock GS has a hard, "wooden" feel to the front brake lever. The stocker hits the "pressure point" and stops dead. In comparison, with the 4-pot caliper the lever feels softer and the "pressure point" is felt through a broader range of lever travel. This is because the larger 4-pot caliper requires the m/c to move more fluid to drive it through it's braking stroke.

Creating hydraulic pressure is all about piston area ratios. The greater the difference in area between slave (caliper) and master cylinder, the greater the resultant preasure. Applied pressure is multiplied by the ratio of the areas of the master and slave cylinders.

Braking force is the product of that created pressure times the area of the caliper's pistons. (divided in half if caliper pistons oppose one another).

I hope I helped it make sense. It's easier to "see it" in your head than it is to articulate.
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