ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Gear > The Garage
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-09-2011, 07:33 PM   #1831
Old_Lion
Crotchety Biker
 
Old_Lion's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
Oddometer: 2,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
Look here about metal core. If you can navigate the site, find the speeds and feeds. It will give an inch per minute and voltage spec.
http://products.esabna.com/EN/home/coreweld
Hope this Link works.
Only
COREWELD 80C-Ni1
makes reference to mill scale and light rust tolerance.
Quote;"
Coreweld 80C-Ni1 is a metal cored wire for application where good low temperature impact toughness
or weathering characteristics are required.
It operates over a broad range of parameters, produces a smooth, spray
transfer with minimal fume and spatter and is tolerant of light rust and
millscale. The shielding gas used should be Ar 75-92% / 25-8% CO2.

"
End quote.

==============
In
http://content.lincolnelectric.com/pdfs/products/literature/c311.pdf

Lincoln Electic states in the description of all but one the
Metalshield varieties:
"
The wire tolerates moderate amounts of surface contaminants....


"


Metalshield
MC-706 E70C-6M H8
Quote:
"

Metalshield MC-706
is a mild steel, metal-cored wire

designed for superior arc performance in high deposition,

high travel speed applications requiring minimal amounts
of spatter, improved arc wetting action, and enhanced
silicon island management. The wire tolerates higher
amounts of surface contaminants and produces welds
with Charpy V-notch toughness down to -40F (-40C).
All position welding.
"






George



__________________
"Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere"

Plug and Plug.
Old_Lion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2011, 02:08 AM   #1832
sakurama
on an endless build
 
sakurama's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2004
Location: NYC & PDX
Oddometer: 1,372
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudgepondexpress View Post
OK, simple question but I want professional input.

I need to weld up and machine down a steering stem.
If you have a lathe and intend to machine the welded stem why not simply make the stem? Threading isn't too complicated and it could be done from appropriate materials. Or, more simply, make a sleeve that press fits tightly (using the torch/freeze method) or uses a locking compound. Either, I would think, are more suitable.

I think your method is introducing unnecessary work and stress. I would look for the easy way.

Gregor
sakurama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2011, 03:24 AM   #1833
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,384
Thank you for the link old lion. I will get the rest of the #s today off the reel. I don't have any more buckets until my customer brings them.

For the steering stem, I tried to keep my mouth shut, but

Its going to warp no matter how its welded. If its done in strips down the side it will be a hex. If done continuously around it will get too hot. I think it will warp worse if quenched. I was thinking of "make a new one" too. Small mig (lowest heat input) welds allowing the piece to cool completely should give the smallest warpage.

David
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2011, 10:44 AM   #1834
DaBit
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Netherlands
Oddometer: 345
I usually fabricate things for the bike on the bike itself. Make a few pieces of metal fit, tack it, take it off, weld it. Put it back on so eventual small warpagecan be accounted for, repeat.
For that I use a DC TIG machine.

But especially the tacking part is not very handy with TIG. The torch won't fit in a cramped space, or I miss a third hand when the fit is not perfect enough for welding without filler.

Now, I do have an electrode clamp, but then I have to swap + and - connections on the machine, flip a switch, and the cable to the clamp is a lot shorter than the TIG hose/cable.

So, what about swapping the tungsten for a 6011 electrode in the TIG-torch, use that for a few tack welds, swap back to the tungsten, remove slag, and weld completely? That would be a quick process, and being able to use the HF arc start would be an advantage too.

Would that work? Polarity on the electrode would be DCEN which is usually the wrong polarity for electrode welding. Would that hurt? Would the 6011 metal interfere with the ER70S2 filler I normally use on mild steel?
DaBit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2011, 12:37 PM   #1835
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,384
Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaBit View Post
I usually fabricate things for the bike on the bike itself. Make a few pieces of metal fit, tack it, take it off, weld it. Put it back on so eventual small warpagecan be accounted for, repeat.
For that I use a DC TIG machine.

But especially the tacking part is not very handy with TIG. The torch won't fit in a cramped space, or I miss a third hand when the fit is not perfect enough for welding without filler.

Now, I do have an electrode clamp, but then I have to swap + and - connections on the machine, flip a switch, and the cable to the clamp is a lot shorter than the TIG hose/cable.

So, what about swapping the tungsten for a 6011 electrode in the TIG-torch, use that for a few tack welds, swap back to the tungsten, remove slag, and weld completely? That would be a quick process, and being able to use the HF arc start would be an advantage too.

Would that work? Polarity on the electrode would be DCEN which is usually the wrong polarity for electrode welding. Would that hurt? Would the 6011 metal interfere with the ER70S2 filler I normally use on mild steel?
I personally would not do it, but it will work. 6013 runs better DCEN.

Will the metal from the stick electrode interfer with the tig? No, but the slag is a bitch. I have a customer that tacks things with stick then I tig them. I clean off ALL the slag I can. Even a little screws me up.

I said I would run some metal core today, not going to happen. On another job for a day or two. Ramps for a trailer.

Vice grips are a good thing along with f and C clamps.

David
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 04:06 PM   #1836
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,384
Ground

Some have to call it a work clamp which it really is, but to me its always been the ground.



David
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 04:19 PM   #1837
mnd
Beastly Adventurer
 
mnd's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
Oddometer: 1,067
Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
Some have to call it a work clamp which it really is, but to me its always been the ground.

I think I'm gonna copy that good idea. I've been looking for a good ground clamp and haven't found anything I like, besides an electrode holder, which only works well for sheet metal.
__________________
Map of Northern Virginia Tag-O-Rama
My NoVA Dirt map.
mnd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 05:53 PM   #1838
Old_Lion
Crotchety Biker
 
Old_Lion's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
Oddometer: 2,781
Saga continues

Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
Some have to call it a work clamp which it really is, but to me its always been the ground. David
Harbor Freight is going to sell some vise grips to Adventure Riders.
David you are a genius!
===================

The saga continues:
Went to HF today and bought the 90 amp flux core welder.
An acquaintance who works as a welder for Grumman Boats
told me he owns one and uses a Forney Wire (NAPA) with high nickel content.
Lays nice beads so he says. We'll see.

All I expect to do is tacks and finish with my stick welder.
Also bought an auto-darkening helmet ($79.99) which was on sale
for with 20% coupon cost me $36.00.
I am entering the modern age.



The welder did not qualify for this coupon.

I bought a mess of other stuff because I rarely get to Syracuse.
60 miles one way.
Also stopped at Haun Welding Supply in Syracuse.
They had a very clean used Power MIG 215 on the floor. $1,000.
"Let me think about it." (On Ebay for $1,520.)

George
__________________
"Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere"

Plug and Plug.

Old_Lion screwed with this post 03-11-2011 at 06:08 PM
Old_Lion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2011, 06:57 AM   #1839
DirtyOldMan
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2006
Location: Banjoland
Oddometer: 1,875



I don't care what you do, I cannot produce a weld like this unless its clean.






I couldn't produce a weld like that if hell froze over and Santa Clause came on the 4th of July.



What about cast iron?
Could a cracked piece be welded? Brazed?
The repair would not have to be made to any kind of close tolerances and would be subjected to some force in use.

I have at my disposal a mig welder, some enthusiasm and limited skills.
I'm a cabinetmaker, good with the wood, not so much with metals.
Oh, I have a woodstove I could preheat the parts in. (heard that was a good idea)


The item to be repaired is an antique woodworking vise. It was cracked when it was used to try and press out a u-joint. Yes, dummy move, 20 yrs ago. I didn't do it but I did allow it. It has given me 20 yrs worth of ammo for ribbing a ham handed buddy of mine however. "Here, gimme that, you broke a f'n vise, remember?'
__________________
Sandy Jackson
04 250 RFS

13 650 Terra

96 R1100R
DirtyOldMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2011, 04:53 PM   #1840
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,384
Laugh

Old Lion, I have a couple of those harbor freight helmets. They are great. They work like they are supposed to. My son used one his first year of boces. You can adjust the tint so you can SEE the weld! The wire you are going to use runs ELECTRODE - or DCEN. It smokes a little and leaves a little spatter. Congrats on the new adventure. First job weld a bolt to a $27.00 pair of Vice grips. Then build a little cart for your welder. Grocery cart wheels work well......

Thanks for the compliment dirtyoldman. Hit your vice with a grinder and look at the sparks. Short red sparks are cast Iron. Longer yellow sparks with tails are for cast steel which can be welded easier than cast Iron. If in doubt grind something you know what is to help you compare.

David
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 06:12 AM   #1841
Old_Lion
Crotchety Biker
 
Old_Lion's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Whiskey Pint, NY
Oddometer: 2,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
Old Lion, I have a couple of those harbor freight helmets. They are great. They work like they are supposed to. My son used one his first year of boces. You can adjust the tint so you can SEE the weld! The wire you are going to use runs ELECTRODE - or DCEN. It smokes a little and leaves a little spatter. Congrats on the new adventure. First job weld a bolt to a $27.00 pair of Vice grips. Then build a little cart for your welder. Grocery cart wheels work well...... David
$27.00?
How about HF
http://www.harborfreight.com/11-inch...set-37006.html

$2.97 temporarily out of stock.



That price has a built-in goofup protection.

George
__________________
"Honeste vivere, alterum non laedere, suum cuique tribuere"

Plug and Plug.
Old_Lion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 07:02 AM   #1842
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,384
I have found after many years if it does not say Vice Grip not to buy. Only for me. I have tried em all. Those self adjusting ones are cool for a couple of weeks, then they end up in the scrap bin.

To each his own says the guy that owns all snap on tools.

I still have the 3/8" drive S-K socket My dad gave me when I was 12.

A good ground makes for trouble free good looking welds.

David
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 07:04 AM   #1843
Brownsvillian
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Oddometer: 447
Whats the difference between a Lincoln 180c, 180t, and a 180HD or Pro 180.

I understand that the 180 c/t is continous, versus tap, but what does that mean.


THe HD and Pro 180 are retail welders, and are cheaper, are they worth buying, or am I going to regret not going to the store and spending a little more for the real deal?
Brownsvillian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 08:02 AM   #1844
David R
I been called a Nut Job..
 
David R's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Location: In Da Swamps of WNY
Oddometer: 2,384
T = Taps for voltage. There may be 4, 5 or 6 or how ever many taps. These are heat ranges for the constant voltage setting. Fine tuning is accomplished by adjusting the wire speed.

C= Continuous voltage setting. You now have infinite heat settings.


When I dial in my mig welder, I set wire speed in inches per minute for amps then voltage to fine tune the arc for a good sound, no spatter and smooth arc.

On my SP100 I just go by what is printed inside the door of the welder. Actually I have had the machine for over 20 years, so I just set it.

HD = Home Depot Not as good as the machines sold in the welding store. Go to a welding store and listen to them curse the HD. They can or should e able to tell you the difference between their higher priced one. They ARE different.
__________________
2012 R1200R ! 2000 R1100RT (retired), 1976 R75/6, 11 Versys
There is a seat for everyone.
David R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2011, 08:31 AM   #1845
RPD1
We don't
 
RPD1's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Location: East PA
Oddometer: 15,259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Lion View Post
$27.00?
How about HF
http://www.harborfreight.com/11-inch...set-37006.html

$2.97 temporarily out of stock.



That price has a built-in goofup protection.

George

I've tried those, George. It's not worth the frustration.
RPD1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014