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Old 07-30-2013, 09:42 AM   #3526
Nytelyte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David R View Post
Don't worry you got it. The rod should not hit bottom, but its not the end of the world. Long arc makes spatter. Less weave more stringers. Looking good!

Get scrap steel from a scrap yard, or as they call them one recycling yards.
What does "Less weave, more stringers" mean? I've been trying to do the half circles, figure 8s, or push/pull methods, and I can't tell much difference between those and a straight slow pull... perhaps my hands aren't as steady as I'd like?

Thanks!
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Old 07-30-2013, 10:06 AM   #3527
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nytelyte View Post
This is WAY below you folk's pay grade, but..

I'm learning to stick weld because there are things I want to make that simply require basic welding, and, If you can glue metal together, you can make ANYTHING. So I bought a Lincoln AC-225, ran a circuit to the garage, got some scrap steel and some 6013 and started plugging away at it after watching a bunch of Youtube videos.
Nice beads for a beginner.

FYI, they make a wheel kit for that welder. Or, just buy some rod or all-thread & mount your own lawn mower wheels.

I have one of those Lincolns I need to sell. I've upgraded to an AC/DC TIG that can also be used for stick welding.
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Old 07-30-2013, 02:41 PM   #3528
jules083
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nytelyte View Post
This is WAY below you folk's pay grade, but..

I'm learning to stick weld because there are things I want to make that simply require basic welding, and, If you can glue metal together, you can make ANYTHING. So I bought a Lincoln AC-225, ran a circuit to the garage, got some scrap steel and some 6013 and started plugging away at it after watching a bunch of Youtube videos.
Couple questions:
When you are running the bead and controlling the arc, I know you need to stay pretty tight in there, but should you feel the stick dragging / hitting on the bottom of the puddle / base metals? As in, the lowest part of the stick bumping into the still hard steel? The only way I can seem to get this not to happen is to hold the stick at 60deg or so of an angle, and a bunch of the stuff online said to hold it closer to 45deg to control the puddle and push the slag back.. Thoughts?
Also, where can I get scrap steel cheap? I don't care if its bent, broken, rusty, whatever... but buying this bar stock is going to get expensive, and I want to practice more before I trust anything I build to anything.
This is my current setup, nothing fancy: (note, Tycho and Antares, the WeldPups, are inside when this is happening, and the rear door and garage door are open and the fan is on)
welddogs
My first project is a little roll cart / stick /helmet holder for my welder, as its currently monopolizing my creeper. Then off to AtomicZombie...

Some practice shots. Note, some (not all) of the terrible bits are on purpose, seeing what happens when I long arc, too hot, too cold, hold in one spot, etc. Trying to familiarize myself with the different sounds and timing, etc. This is all with 1/8th steel, mostly at either 120 or 135 amp setting (who knows how accurate) and with 6013AC rods, inexpensive ones from US Forge. Mostly I'm just running a bunch of beads to get down the motions, understand whats going on, etc. This bar is the first time I've ever welded., don't be too harsh.
weld
weld2

Thoughts, critiques, snide remarks, helpful suggestions?
It doesn't look bad for starting out. You bought a machine that is a little bit harder to learn on, being as it's AC only. That's good in a way though, because most other machines will seem easy. I learned on the same machine you have and still use it often.

Check out www.weldingtipsandtricks.com, it's a pretty helpful site.

Scrap steel shouldn't be hard to find, just be resourceful. Scrap yard, junk yard, that kind of place. Craigslist maybe even. Anything works for practice beads.

When you start sticking stuff together a good way to test your weld is to make an upside down T. Only weld one side of it then break it off to look at your weld. It will break easier than it sounds. Your weld should break uniformly, and the inside of it should look like a clean break. That will also show you just how important it is to make each weld in its entirety, not just one side.

Anything else just ask. Someone will answer.

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Old 07-30-2013, 03:03 PM   #3529
David R
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Post #3578 of the stick welds.

The top left bead in the last picture next to the fillet is too cold. The toes of the weld are not wet into the base plate. This could be from going too fast, trying some kind of weave, not enough heat, or dirty base metal including not griding the mill scale off.

For the weave vs stringers. A weave is moving the rod back and forth in what ever pattern. A stringer is just a bead about the width of the rod including the flux. Just let the weld go to the plate. Simple and nothing fancy. I would not go back into the puddle with 6013 like you said a figure 8. That would be a whip. Its a good way to add slag into your weld.

Welding stringers you can get travel speed and rod angle consistent.

Rod angle should be 15 or so degrees from perpendicular to the base metal. You can change that. Watch how the slag forms. If its not behind the puddle, a little more angle is OK. A little more heat will also help blow the slag behind the puddle. If its too far back, usually you need less heat.

WATCH the puddle. It should be molten, consistent and the slag should be a rod or two diameters behind.

David
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Old 07-31-2013, 11:20 PM   #3530
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nytelyte View Post
This is my current setup, nothing fancy: (note, Tycho and Antares, the WeldPups, are inside when this is happening, and the rear door and garage door are open and the fan is on)




Thoughts, critiques, snide remarks, helpful suggestions?
since you asked for helpful suggestions
I would put the dogs outside when welding so you don't fry their eyes
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Old 08-01-2013, 05:17 AM   #3531
Nytelyte
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Originally Posted by airborndad View Post
since you asked for helpful suggestions
I would put the dogs outside when welding so you don't fry their eyes
Lol.. "Inside" meant in the house, not out in the garage. I'm avoiding toasted pups.

& thanks folks. Off to practice more.
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Old 08-02-2013, 06:53 AM   #3532
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Another question...

If the gauge and width of the piece of steel are the same matter as far as correct amperage to run?
Reason: I've pretty much filled up that chunk of steel in the pictures, and swapped to the other piece that you can see on the ground in one pic. BUT I've cut the chunks of steel out of that one that I used to make some of those fillet welds, so over all its shorter, but the same in every other way. And now, on the same amperages, the welds are pooling, or being overall wider and not as nice as they were on the other strip.
What could be causing this? (and the answer of "you are a n00b and its too early to troubleshoot problems with the steel because you don't have any technique yet is perfectly acceptable, lol) In my head I can't figure out why it would matter electrically, but at the same time I can't identify anything else different.
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Old 08-02-2013, 09:05 AM   #3533
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Sounds like your practice piece is overheating. As you weld the steel keeps soaking in heat. The hotter it is the less amps you need for the same result. Typically before that happens you would be done there and moved on to another part, but practising would keep you in the same area. Combine the size of the piece, amps used, and time that you're welding vs time to cool. All factors play a part.

Seems also that you're gunning very hot. Your welds look good though, and I haven't ran 6013 in a few years.

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Old 08-06-2013, 09:02 AM   #3534
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I've got a stripped-out phillips head screw that I need to remove. Since The Garage forum is essentially a removing-stripped-out-stuff forum, from reading I have learned that one possible solution is to weld a nut onto a fastener and use the nut to remove what's stuck. Well, I tried this, but had no success. Both times I was able to fill the center of the nut with weld, but couldn't get the nut to stick to the stripped fastener. The only welding tool I have at my disposal is a 110v Lincoln flux-core machine. Do you guys think that it's even possible to do this kind of delicate precision work with flux core? Any suggestions for success?
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Old 08-06-2013, 09:28 AM   #3535
David R
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I've got a stripped-out phillips head screw that I need to remove. Since The Garage forum is essentially a removing-stripped-out-stuff forum, from reading I have learned that one possible solution is to weld a nut onto a fastener and use the nut to remove what's stuck. Well, I tried this, but had no success. Both times I was able to fill the center of the nut with weld, but couldn't get the nut to stick to the stripped fastener. The only welding tool I have at my disposal is a 110v Lincoln flux-core machine. Do you guys think that it's even possible to do this kind of delicate precision work with flux core? Any suggestions for success?
Yes you can do it. I do it all the time. The process should not matter much as long as you are good with it.

What size is the head of your screw? The nut should be a little bigger.
Start the arc with the wire on the fastener, weld from there. someitmes I have a pile of nuts on the floor before success. Use LOTS of heat. you only get to weld for a short time.

Here is one nut that did not hold and finally I got it.

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Old 08-07-2013, 01:52 AM   #3536
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I've got a stripped-out phillips head screw that I need to remove. Since The Garage forum is essentially a removing-stripped-out-stuff forum, from reading I have learned that one possible solution is to weld a nut onto a fastener and use the nut to remove what's stuck. Well, I tried this, but had no success. Both times I was able to fill the center of the nut with weld, but couldn't get the nut to stick to the stripped fastener. The only welding tool I have at my disposal is a 110v Lincoln flux-core machine. Do you guys think that it's even possible to do this kind of delicate precision work with flux core? Any suggestions for success?
Not a great idea to try welding a nut onto broken fastener. The fastest and easiest way to do this type of job is to put on a blob of weld big enough to be able to turn with vise grips. That works in about 75% of cases, but would probably be much easier to do if you werent using flux core.
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Old 08-07-2013, 03:09 AM   #3537
David R
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Here are a bunch of failures before I finally got the SOB. It was an exhaust stud in a ninja 600.



These were ALL the manifold bolts on an F350



Even this one


My son works with me. He says welding a nut to it is my answer to everything.
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Old 08-07-2013, 04:35 AM   #3538
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We do it all the time.
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Old 08-07-2013, 05:03 AM   #3539
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I've welded a bunch of nuts on. Flux core, gas shield, 6011, and 7018ac. It all works, just get as much weld as possible on the stud.

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Old 08-07-2013, 06:09 AM   #3540
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Not a great idea to try welding a nut onto broken fastener.
why?
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