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Old 08-16-2012, 02:31 PM   #5941
Wallrat
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For you SE Asia guys, why is it so hard/expensive to get parts? Companies don't ship there? Can't you get a US-based friend to order parts and ship them to you? If its customs fees then you could have them dummy up a purchase order for a fraction of the actual price.
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Old 08-16-2012, 07:43 PM   #5942
Sateev
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallrat View Post
For you SE Asia guys, why is it so hard/expensive to get parts? Companies don't ship there? Can't you get a US-based friend to order parts and ship them to you? If its customs fees then you could have them dummy up a purchase order for a fraction of the actual price.
The short answer is: "Because it's not Orange County..."

For me, it's not so much about not being able to order things, because I have a mailbox service in the US that will forward stuff to my address here in Thailand. The real problem is getting it reliably delivered here.

Even here in the big city (Bangkok), addresses are not sequential, and there are very few street name signs once you get away from the main thoroughfares, so mail delivery relies on the postman knowing you, or at least the building you live in. If the regular guy changes jobs, or is out sick for a while, mail may not get delivered at all.

Up country, where I lived last year, it's even worse. There may be NO ONE who knows your house. Utility bills come by an employee of the utility often, or they would never get paid, and even then, I used to start getting itchy when the phone (internet) bill hadn't shown up for a while, and I'd run down to the phone company only to find out that NOBODY in our neighborhood got their bill, and "no problem, sir, we won't cut you off, the mail is unreliable, just pay now..."

Add that to the fact that addresses are spelled in Thai, and usually get transliterated incorrectly into English, and no one speaks English anyway, and you begin to get the idea.

The only reliable service is EMS, which is an international service. When you ship stuff from the US by USPS Global Express Mail, it gets delivered locally by the EMS service of the local post office. Naturally, they give EMS priority, because it's tracked, and they are held accountable. For regular mail, given the very low wages paid the postal workers (about $8 a DAY), it's some times easier to toss a bundle in the canal than to stay late and deliver it...

So, I always use Express, and most of the time let it accumulate in my mailbox in the US, consolidate it, and pay the $50 - $60 it takes for a smallish box.

Then we have Customs, the most corrupt part of a very corrupt system. The only way to get past them is to send very small boxes, valued at under $25, and then it's about 50-50 whether they will open the box to see if there's anything thay can charge for. Most times, they don't bother with the small stuff, but for big stuff, regardless of what's on the bill of lading, they open it, assign their own idea of a value, and then add duty taxes on top. This not only means you have to pay to get your package, but you also have to go to the post office, which, in my case, is quite far from home, and in an area that's very dangerous for motorcycles (lots of buses, taxis, pushcarts in the curb lane, and cops just waiting for you to drive in the second lane (which is illegal) so they can get your money.)

This is clearly a lot more than you may want to know about it, but, hey, you asked...and this is just for Thailand. Laos, where the OP lives, is a couple hundred years behind, and Cambodia, where I may eventually live, is like the Stone Age.

Why do we live here? If you have to ask, you'll never know...



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Old 08-17-2012, 02:12 PM   #5943
Klay
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Oil report

I tried two different types of oils, Rotella T 10W-40 in one bike, and NAPA 15W-40 full synthetic in the other 200. The Rotella didn't improve the sticky and harsh shifting, but the full synthetic completely and seemingly miraculously cleared up the shifting problems. It's like a different bike, and it feels quieter and smoother, too, but that's probably a subjective result of just being happier about the shifting.

I drained out the Rotella on the first bike and put the synthetic in there, too. They're both shifting dreamy-like now. Happy solution not involving clutch plate replacement. I did some roll-on tests in top gear, and they're not slipping at all, either. So if the synthetic is more slippery, 14 horsepower still isn't enough to overcome the friction plates.
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:37 PM   #5944
Sateev
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Klay View Post
I tried two different types of oils, Rotella T 10W-40 in one bike, and NAPA 15W-40 full synthetic in the other 200. The Rotella didn't improve the sticky and harsh shifting, but the full synthetic completely and seemingly miraculously cleared up the shifting problems. It's like a different bike, and it feels quieter and smoother, too, but that's probably a subjective result of just being happier about the shifting.

I drained out the Rotella on the first bike and put the synthetic in there, too. They're both shifting dreamy-like now. Happy solution not involving clutch plate replacement. I did some roll-on tests in top gear, and they're not slipping at all, either. So if the synthetic is more slippery, 14 horsepower still isn't enough to overcome the friction plates.
Do either of those oils carry JASO M or MA approval? I ask because there is currently a lot of talk about Rotella T6 5w-40, which is a full synthetic and has the JASO-M rating. It seems to be the 'oil du jour' on various bike performance forums.
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:47 PM   #5945
Klay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sateev View Post
Do either of those oils carry JASO M or MA approval? I ask because there is currently a lot of talk about Rotella T6 5w-40, which is a full synthetic and has the JASO-M rating. It seems to be the 'oil du jour' on various bike performance forums.
The bottle of Rotella is long-gone. So I'm not sure. But I fished out the bottle of NAPA synthetic from the recycling and found I'm in error. It's 15W-50, not 15W-40. It has no JASO rating, but is rated at API service SM/SL.

And it says "energy conserving" on the bottom of the roundel, which means it has slippery additives you aren't supposed to use in a motorcycle. But the clutches are not slipping.
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:01 PM   #5946
Sateev
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Originally Posted by Klay View Post
The bottle of Rotella is long-gone. So I'm not sure. But I fished out the bottle of NAPA synthetic from the recycling and found I'm in error. It's 15W-50, not 15W-40. It has no JASO rating, but is rated at API service SM/SL.

And it says "energy conserving" on the bottom of the roundel, which means it has slippery additives you aren't supposed to use in a motorcycle. But the clutches are not slipping.
Well, there's nothing like testing it yourself to get it right. And I think you're right: 14 hp is not going to push anything to the limit, although I'm sure they designed the clutch for that kind of power (and maybe a bit more, since the 200 Djebel specs I found show 20 hp).

On that topic, I wonder what is different in the Djebel that gives it another 6 hp...probably the older flat-slide carb, instead of the BST-31, and maybe the cam? It looks otherwise identical to DR200SE engine and airbox, judging from the pics the guy from Laos (almost) posted.
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Old 08-18-2012, 07:39 AM   #5947
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Sateev- Thanks man, that’s exactly what I needed to hear. I gave up on the idea of fixing this thing myself- I took it in to a moto shop that caters to expats. In the States I always did my own work on bikes for fun and to teach myself a life skill, but obviously have some pretty limited actual knowledge of what I am doing. I don’t think this project will be any fun and judging by the third world fixes I have seen on this bike already I think it will be way too confusing. The labor will cost about $10-20 usd from the shop so it really is a no brainer. They also know how to have everything I need fabricated here, and they promised they weren’t just going to cut up an old bicycle tire for the gaskets.

The guys at the shop are Vietnamese so I had a Vietnamese friend come with me to help communicate in their first language – After listening to them joke and laugh with each other for about 45 minutes I am pretty confident that they will actually take their time to do a good job. Their shop is next to a police stand where I have had a lot of problems and they even recognised me as the falung with the vietnamese bike who refuses to pay bribes ( my other bike is a Honda Win). My tactic for not paying a bribe here is to make the conversation as confusing as possible until the cops get tired of me and just tell me to leave, this can take a long time though- and the bike shop guys apparently have really enjoyed listening to me speak in Spanish to Lao officials.

As for the question about parts availability, Sateev summed it up pretty well on the logistics. I have lived in my current house for 5 months and don’t know my address, street name or even what the name of the village (suburb) I live in. I can have stuff shipped to my office, but then run the risk of someone just stealing it in transit…

The real problem in Laos though is one of supply and demand. We have a 100% tax on all foreign vehicles. A local Kolao scooter can cost as little as about $300-500 usd new. A 15 year old heavily used and abused japanese bike is about 3,000. In a country where the majority of the population lives on less than$2 per day there is little demand for “big” bikes. No demand for the bikes means no supply of the parts.

Attempt # 2 for pics… The gas station pic is not mine, but shows a typical gas station in the jungle... and explains what I meant by poor gas quality. And this is a "nice" place ,the crappy places literally are gust guys selling petrol out of old beer bottles. I also threw in a front pic showing the headlight- which for some reason I think is just kinda cool...







http://i1050.photobucket.com/albums/...2/491be99b.jpg
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Old 08-18-2012, 10:36 AM   #5948
Conman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Klay View Post
I tried two different types of oils, Rotella T 10W-40 in one bike, and NAPA 15W-40 full synthetic in the other 200. The Rotella didn't improve the sticky and harsh shifting, but the full synthetic completely and seemingly miraculously cleared up the shifting problems. It's like a different bike, and it feels quieter and smoother, too, but that's probably a subjective result of just being happier about the shifting.

I drained out the Rotella on the first bike and put the synthetic in there, too. They're both shifting dreamy-like now. Happy solution not involving clutch plate replacement. I did some roll-on tests in top gear, and they're not slipping at all, either. So if the synthetic is more slippery, 14 horsepower still isn't enough to overcome the friction plates.
Good to know about no slipping. I've been using Suzuki Synthetic 10w40 in my DR200 for two years, no issues so far.
http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/...+SYNTHETIC+OIL Will continue to use this in the DR200.

As for my other bikes, Kids dirtbikes use regular 4stroke motorcycle oil from Autozone and for my two stroke use cheap ATF Type F Transmission fluid from Walmart and change frequently.

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Old 08-18-2012, 11:11 AM   #5949
BigCanoe
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Question about jet kit...

I am thinking of purchasing the Kientech jet kit for the DR200. Can I do the jet kit and the airbox mod without doing the muffler? Would I need to change something if I did the muffler mod or purchased the FMF exhaust?
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Old 08-18-2012, 11:28 AM   #5950
Klay
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Question about jet kit...

I am thinking of purchasing the Kientech jet kit for the DR200. Can I do the jet kit and the airbox mod without doing the muffler? Would I need to change something if I did the muffler mod or purchased the FMF exhaust?
I swapped in the jets and opened the airbox without doing the muffler mod at first. It worked fine. Didn't change anything after the muffler modification.
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Old 08-18-2012, 11:39 AM   #5951
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Thanks! And I dont want to remove the lid, I just want to cut one or more holes in it, will that fly too? Not sure how picky these things are :)
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Old 08-18-2012, 11:45 AM   #5952
Klay
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Thanks! And I dont want to remove the lid, I just want to cut one or more holes in it, will that fly too? Not sure how picky these things are :)
I put a two inch hole in the lid. It seemed to run fine with the lid completely off, too, but I didn't like all the intake noise.
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Old 08-18-2012, 11:47 AM   #5953
BigCanoe
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Rock on, thanks man! :)

I spend hours (literally) and installed new Pro Taper bars, grips, and cycle gear hand guards on my 200. It took me a long time to get everything straight and dialed in. The good news is they look great and the vibrations have all but disappeared from the handle bars!

I am looking at the jet kit/exhaust/airbox and petcock as my next tweaks.
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:22 PM   #5954
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I have been keeping track of the fuel mileage on my DR200 since I purchased it back in May. The only modifications include the jetting kit, air box modification, and Michelin T63 tires. I put the tires on recently and are lower on the MPG list but I can't conclude that the new knobbies ruined the MPG numbers because I have been riding hard off road since they went on which will account for the lower MPG numbers.

I weigh 130lbs and live at 750ft elevation. It's summer so the average temperature is around 85 degrees.

It seems I always get 80-85 MPG with smooth riding on the street, and 75-80 MPG with lots of full throttle on the street. My dirt MPG has too much variation but it seems to be 65-70 average.

The star next to the miles per gallon number indicates there was a lot of off road riding with low gears & high RPM.


Gallons Miles MPG

1.530 / 131 / 86
2.483 / 191 / 77*
1.195 / 082 / 69
1.725 / 140 / 81
1.342 / 112 / 84
1.500 / 127 / 85
2.438 / 193 / 79
2.179 / 177 / 81
2.472 / 183 / 74*
2.175 / 175 / 81*
2.119 / 166 / 78
2.507 / 210 / 84
2.435 / 169 / 69*
2.342 / 171 / 73*
1.006 / 073 / 73*
1.508 / 110 / 73*
1.780 / 115 / 65*
2.436 / 172 / 71*
2.241 / 149 / 67*
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:17 AM   #5955
Wallrat
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Thanks for the info on the logistics issues in SE Asia. I've heard repeatedly that its hard to get parts there but I had no idea why. And no your explanations weren't too verbose.

For gaskets, you might try something along the lines of a machine shop or pipe supply if there's anything like that around. They might have sheets of gasket material so that you can cut your own. Just try to find something about the same thickness as the one you're replacing as that will have an effect on compression if you change it.
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