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Old 06-15-2013, 08:14 PM   #16291
cantthinkof1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heirhead View Post
Chain what?

heirhead
chain guard, yeah forgot a key word there... my bad
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Old 06-16-2013, 03:25 AM   #16292
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cantthinkof1 View Post
chain guard, yeah forgot a key word there... my bad
I believe you mean chain "guide". I.e. the white plastic component below the swing arm. As far as replacements for it, the swing arm is the same on all DR350 models so I think anything thing made for any year DR350 will bolt on. The differences from year to year have to do with the size of the rear sprocket and that might affect the fitment. I'm pretty sure 90-93 "S" models had a 43t rear. '94-'99 "SE" models had a 41t rear. The off road models had much larger rear sprockets. Again, without looking it up, I believe those where 47t and 45t.
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:27 AM   #16293
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPulldown View Post
HID. The hid replacement 4h bulbs are single filimnet. To get high and low the bulb moves back and forth or up and down to direct the beam huge and lower. This is expensive. Most Ebay ones of this type are just half of a car kit. Incomplete due to a chopped wiring harness. Been read that the easiest way is just to go with a regular hid bulb that does not move. Cheap Ebay ones work good. The high beam does give any more light. And the hid is such an improvement in light output that you don't really need the high beam. I plan on going this route.
ok. So basically, your stuck with one setting than correct? in other words, from what your saying if i read it right...theres no real difference between low and high on an HID element?

Wander if ya could install 2 bulbs into back of housing? For example, 2 HID elements, one on at low, and 2 on at high? may work? or may heat the housing up enough to melt off our front fairings. haha. from what ive seen, HID is the way to go! Ive also been reading up on these LED lights that the vendors are selling, but holy cow...expensive!!!
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:56 AM   #16294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mustangwagz View Post
ok. So basically, your stuck with one setting than correct? in other words, from what your saying if i read it right...theres no real difference between low and high on an HID element?
Not exactly!

A normal H-4 halogen bulb has two filaments (the bit which gives off the light) in slightly different positions. Through the magic of refraction and reflection, you get a different beam pattern, depending which one it lit (Hi & Lo beam)

HID bulbs only have one arc (the bit which gives off the light). That means you either get only one of Hi or Lo beam, depending where the arc is positioned and how you adjust the lamp, OR you can get a H4 bixenon HID lamp where there is an electrical device that causes the entire bulb to move inside the housing, thereby giving an approximation to two different filaments in a H4 Halogen bulb.

Quote:
Wander if ya could install 2 bulbs into back of housing? For example, 2 HID elements, one on at low, and 2 on at high? may work? or may heat the housing up enough to melt off our front fairings. haha. from what ive seen, HID is the way to go! Ive also been reading up on these LED lights that the vendors are selling, but holy cow...expensive!!!
Your two HID bulbs idea would not work as the optimal position for the two arcs is only about 1/4" from each other. You would not likely melt anything however. A typical HID is brighter than a typical incandescent bulb because more of the energy is emitted as visible light and less as heat. Therefore an HID bulb will run cooler and put less heat into the lamp housing than a halogen bulb (the HID also consumes less power while putting out more visible light.) However, HID bulbs CAN cause a different damage as they emit far more UV light than an incandescent bulb. Over a long time period, especially if you use a higher wattage HID in a lamp with a plastic reflector or lens, you can bleach the reflector or cloud the lens. With normal 35W HID in the DR headlamp, this should not be a concern.

In the long term, LEDs are the way to go but they are not QUITE ready for cheap headlamp upgrades just yet. They are smaller than HIDs and do not require a control box. Also they light instantly and are even more efficient than HID. There are downsides however: Although LEDs don't give off a great deal of heat, they are very sensitive to it, so they need to be well cooled. Secondly, it's much harder to even approximate the filament location of an incandescent (tungsten/halogen) bulb and therefore not possible to "upgrade" a conventional lamp simply by switching out the bulb. You need a complete, custom-designed headlamp assembly in order to get the right cooling and beam patterns, etc. At this time those designs are still a bit of a novelty and therefore commanding an extreme price. Large -scale manufacturers are working with OEM vehicle manufacturers to rectify this and I predict it won't be long before most new cars have LED lighting. Aftermarket suppliers surely will not be far behind. Indeed, if you're not worried about beam pattern and DOT legality, you can already buy some pretty good LED driving lamps for reasonable prices and some people are finding ways to use two of these to replace the stock headlamp while still having something a bit like a hi and lo beam.
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slartidbartfast screwed with this post 06-16-2013 at 06:11 AM
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Old 06-16-2013, 06:24 AM   #16295
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slartidbartfast View Post
Not exactly!

A normal H-4 halogen bulb has two filaments (the bit which gives off the light) in slightly different positions. Through the magic of refraction and reflection, you get a different beam pattern, depending which one it lit (Hi & Lo beam)

HID bulbs only have one arc (the bit which gives off the light). That means you either get only one of Hi or Lo beam, depending where the arc is positioned and how you adjust the lamp, OR you can get a H4 bixenon HID lamp where there is an electrical device that causes the entire bulb to move inside the housing, thereby giving an approximation to two different filaments in a H4 Halogen bulb.



Your two HID bulbs idea would not work as the optimal position for the two arcs is only about 1/4" from each other. You would not likely melt anything however. A typical HID is brighter than a typical incandescent bulb because more of the energy is emitted as visible light and less as heat. Therefore an HID bulb will run cooler and put less heat into the lamp housing than a halogen bulb (the HID also consumes less power while putting out more visible light.) However, HID bulbs CAN cause a different damage as they emit far more UV light than an incandescent bulb. Over a long time period, especially if you use a higher wattage HID in a lamp with a plastic reflector or lens, you can bleach the reflector or cloud the lens. With normal 35W HID in the DR headlamp, this should not be a concern.

In the long term, LEDs are the way to go but they are not QUITE ready for cheap headlamp upgrades just yet. They are smaller than HIDs and do not require a control box. Also they light instantly and are even more efficient than HID. There are downsides however: Although LEDs don't give off a great deal of heat, they are very sensitive to it, so they need to be well cooled. Secondly, it's much harder to even approximate the filament location of an incandescent (tungsten/halogen) bulb and therefore not possible to "upgrade" a conventional lamp simply by switching out the bulb. You need a complete, custom-designed headlamp assembly in order to get the right cooling and beam patterns, etc. At this time those designs are still a bit of a novelty and therefore commanding an extreme price. Large -scale manufacturers are working with OEM vehicle manufacturers to rectify this and I predict it won't be long before most new cars have LED lighting. Aftermarket suppliers surely will not be far behind. Indeed, if you're not worried about beam pattern and DOT legality, you can already buy some pretty good LED driving lamps for reasonable prices and some people are finding ways to use two of these to replace the stock headlamp while still having something a bit like a hi and lo beam.

Wow, Thanks dood! Great explanation!
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Old 06-16-2013, 02:47 PM   #16296
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Re: HID, LED and other bright lights.

"A gentleman does not motor about after dark" - Joseph Lucas. I agree. I ride about 20K miles a year but VERY seldom ride at night. There are just too many critters lurking on the roadside in my part of the world.
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:11 PM   #16297
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thump! View Post
Re: HID, LED and other bright lights.

"A gentleman does not motor about after dark" - Joseph Lucas. I agree. I ride about 20K miles a year but VERY seldom ride at night. There are just too many critters lurking on the roadside in my part of the world.




Why do the british drink their beer warm? Lucas makes refrigerators, too!
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:14 PM   #16298
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What are the three positions on a Lucas light switch? Dim, Flicker, Off
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:58 PM   #16299
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well i like to commute to work with it...and yes..critters lurk....but bills need paid, and why drive inside the tin can box car when you can ride ON the steel frame, plastic wrapped 2 wheeled bike of fun!? lol not to mention the weekend night rides through the woods with all the fellow riders... somethings in life are not avoidable (like going to work to support those that dont wanna ..) so why not make it fun going to, and from. know what i mean. hahaha besides...dont we ALL wanna get something neato for the bike from time to time??
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Old 06-17-2013, 05:50 AM   #16300
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I agree. I am in the Army and I leave to work at 0430-0500 depending on what is going on. I can tell you riding at night here is scary, but I have never had any real issues on my DR350 except wobble from the stupid rim locks, but thats another issue. Riding at night isn't that big a deal for me. I look ahead, avoid dogs and cats, and occasionally when no one is looking catch some air at a certain intersection in town.
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Old 06-17-2013, 05:59 AM   #16301
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wadester View Post

Why do the british drink their beer warm? Lucas makes refrigerators, too!



A little known fact , at one time Lucas made vacuum cleaners.

The only product they made that didn't suck.
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Old 06-17-2013, 08:17 AM   #16302
tonusmaximus
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Needs some lowering links so my brother can ride and not do this. '95 dr350se. pm me ur paypal and price. Thanks!

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Old 06-17-2013, 10:29 AM   #16303
tripletaco
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IMS Tank Mounting

Hey guys i need some help figuring out or confirming mounting for the 3.5gal IMS tank. Ive got a 99 350se I get that it slips on the two round rubber bushings up front but the brackets under the seats got me just a little confused. Any body got some pictures to straighten me out. I bought the tank used so i wasnt sure if something may have been missing. THANKS!
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:53 AM   #16304
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tripletaco View Post
Hey guys i need some help figuring out or confirming mounting for the 3.5gal IMS tank. Ive got a 99 350se I get that it slips on the two round rubber bushings up front but the brackets under the seats got me just a little confused. Any body got some pictures to straighten me out. I bought the tank used so i wasnt sure if something may have been missing. THANKS!
I have one, but it mounts with bolts on my dirt model in the front and under the seat. Did they make a different version to be plug and play with the slightly different mounting setup on the SE?
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Old 06-17-2013, 11:09 AM   #16305
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Originally Posted by Crenshaw View Post
I have one, but it mounts with bolts on my dirt model in the front and under the seat. Did they make a different version to be plug and play with the slightly different mounting setup on the SE?
It was my understanding that the IMS only came in one version to fit both dirt and street models, unlike the clarke or acerbis tanks. Ive got a bracket attached to the tank at the rear and my stock tank/seat bracket but they dont seem to jive.
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