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Old 07-09-2007, 07:36 AM   #1
shojimon OP
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DR650- Lowering questions

I would like to lower my DR650 a bit- so my options are -

-the factory way- Take off the rear shock, invert the spring seat, reinstall in the other link hole, take off the front forks and pull springs and damper and move the spacer.

Has anyone just changed the shock mount to the other linkage hole and slid the fork tubes up in the triples 3/4" or so? What is the downside here?

If the whole front end needs to come apart, I would just as soon do some suspension upgrades at the same time, the forks seem to have the common flaw of too much high speed compression damping (harsh on small qiuck bumps) and too soft springing on large bumps or heavy braking. Some emulators and a stiffer spring might help here ,I think.

And to put into perspective, I do not need a lot of lowering, an inch or two would be fine.

OK, suspension guru's, lead me on!
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Old 07-09-2007, 11:05 AM   #2
bumpathump
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Shoji -

I lowered my 2003 DR650 according to the service manual, slid the fork tubes up 1" in the triple clamps, and cut 1-1/2" off the side stand.



Bike works great for 95:05 paved/unpaved riding up to 80+ mph with no headshake or other handling problems. Offroad riding like Bubba or Ricky - which I would not even dream of attempting - would probably cause problems.

Rick
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Old 07-09-2007, 12:14 PM   #3
AZstrommer
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I slid my fork tubes up 1 1/4 inches for the front end. While I was there, I pulled the top triple clamp off and regreased the upper and lower bearings. You would not believe how little grease there was from the factory. I changed the fork oil with a Mitty-Vac too.

I pulled the shock and did it IAW the factory manual. Just be sure to loosen the spring tension before you remove the shock. to make life easy, pull the airbox out through the rear lower fender. I also took the linkage and swingarm off for a good greasing too. All told, it took an evening to do and it taught me alot about my new ride. (now sold)

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Old 07-09-2007, 12:39 PM   #4
FatChance
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I also raised the fork tubes in the triple clamp and did the rear shock as per the manual. If you do the forks this way, you do not lose any fork travel (as you would with the manual method) as long as you do not raise them enough that the tire would hit the underside of the front fender. I found up to about 1.25" works fine. Also, as I understand it, if you don't reverse the rear shock spring seat, the rear tire could hit under full compression.
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Old 07-09-2007, 03:07 PM   #5
shojimon OP
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So you all did NOT pull the forks apart and change the spacers, instead just slipped them up in the triple clamps?
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Old 07-09-2007, 03:48 PM   #6
Rusty Rocket
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpathump
Shoji -




riding like Bubba or Ricky - which I would not even dream of attempting - would probably cause problems.

Rick

Funny, but I immediately thought of Bubba Shobert and Ricky Graham. (I now know which Bubba and Ricky you meant) Flat tracking that DR in the lowered position would probably make you feel like a #1 plate holder.
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Old 07-09-2007, 04:27 PM   #7
ram1000
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I have been running my wifes dr650 with the forks raised about 3/4-1 inch and the rear shock just dropped to the second bolt hole without reversing the spring perch. I weigh 220 and ride it hard enough to bottom it but have noticed no negative reactions from riding it this way. I only did this for my wife as I am tall enough without lowering it, but I occasionally ride the bike. I took it to Moab last summer and bottomed it a few times there. It handles fine this way.
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Old 07-09-2007, 05:10 PM   #8
bumpathump
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Shoji -

> So you all did NOT pull the forks apart and change the spacers, instead
> just slipped them up in the triple clamps?

I moved the spacers AND slipped the forks up 1" in the triple clamps.

Rick
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Old 07-09-2007, 05:14 PM   #9
shojimon OP
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anybody have a shop manual or online info on how to redo the forks?
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Old 07-09-2007, 06:53 PM   #10
tigrebleau
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I put on Kouba #1 lowering links and replaced the front and rear springs with stronger ones from Jesse. I left off the rear spring lower collar per Jesse's recommendation. I didn't use the alternate mounting hole, and I did not raise the forks in the triple clamps to give a little more stability off-road (also enhanced by Jesse's fork brace). On-road is a bit more stable, too, with less turbulent highway air inputs to the forks through the high front fender. But the coolest thing is the way it now slides in the dirt. really stable and predictable power slides and throttle-steering on demand. Also predictable hook-up at corner exits. What a cool bike!
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Old 07-09-2007, 10:40 PM   #11
bumpathump
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Shoji -

Service manual is at:

<http://www.deakin.edu.au/individuals..._adm/DR650.pdf>

Rick
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