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Old 11-26-2007, 12:00 PM   #151
newcastleadam
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Location: Gainesville, Fl
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Shop Light with Magnet

Picked up one of these from Sears during Black Friday for $15. Although it doesn't have the best rating, it does come with a very cool attachment; a large magnet to stick it on metal items. Items include (but are not limited to) engine blocks, frames, toolboxes, etc.

To replicate this, get a large donut magnet (or anything else) and zip tie it to a light. That way it's not permanent, and can be adjusted. Voila!

And while we're on the magnet thread, these curiously strong magnets from thinkgeek are not only fun to play with, but also functional as well. I use them to put photos, cards, and assorted junk on my workbench, and will keep stuff on in the face of my super fan. One use I discovered last night while drinking beer...err rearranging some tools is to put some magnets under the top lid of tool cabinets. You can put small metal items there (hemostats, scissors, clamps, etc) and use your room more economically. It also makes the tool chest heavier.

Ok, told you where to get some slightly expensive magnets. What if you just want some el cheapos? Go find a refridgerator that's been dumped on the road, awaiting pickup, or just unattended at a friend's house. In the door seal is a very long magnet that keeps the door closed. Just slice open the seal and the thing comes out. Very easy to break into usuable portions as well. Not the strongest magnet, but very serviceable nonetheless.

Cheers,
Adam B
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Old 11-26-2007, 08:10 PM   #152
PackRat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreaseMonkey
Upgrade the stereo in your house, and move the old one into the shop. ....Much easier to do that way than it is to consider buying something of the same quality dedicated just for the shop.
I did the same with the washer and dryer - now I wash work clothes and rags out in the shop. So does several of my rider friends...who said "laundry bitch"??


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Old 11-26-2007, 08:43 PM   #153
HowlingMad
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This:


and this:


...appeal to my meticulous, retentive nature.

I keep Sharpies everywhere so that it's easy to make a note, label a part, improve my hairline, etc. The masking tape makes it easy to change the label on the container, improve the background or keep small parts together.

Great thread.
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Old 11-29-2007, 06:40 PM   #154
ntm
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simple chain lube tip

OK, this is very simple, but it works well.

With the bike on the centerstand, in neutral, I rotate the rear tire with my left hand whilst trying to direct a spray of chain lube exactly where I want it as the chain passes over the rear sprocket (using the little red tube on the spray tip). Difficult to do well as the tip moves a bit as I rotate the tire.

My tip is to simply place another spray can underneath the chain lube can to steady it. Find one the right height. This allows you to place the spray tip a fraction of an inch from the chain and spray the lube exactly where you want it. Very tidy.

Nick
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:14 AM   #155
jgas
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This trick is likely already in this thread somewhere, but if you use Bib Mousse tire inserts, KY Jelly is a good mounting lube. Good for the Mousse' too.

Warming up your tires near the fireplace makes them easier to mount, especially in winter. I do another task while they are getting soft. If it's really cold in my shop, I wrap them in an old wool army blanket to stay warm while I carry them to the shop and get started on mounting. I do the rear which is harder first before it cools, then the front.

I use an old electric oven for a shop heater. Turn it on preheat and 500 degrees, leave the oven door open, turn on all the top burners. It heats my 36x24 barely insulated shop from 30 degrees to 60 degrees in 45 minutes. I have an old vise and some scrap steel that I put on top of the burners which put off heat for hours after I turn off the oven. Pretty redneck, but you can heat things on top of the burners or in the oven. I've used it to heat plastic to re-form it and to oven bake painted parts.

A good handy tool is a heavy duty angle grinder. I used to use an air powered cutting tool which I still use for intricate work, but my Dewalt 4" grinder is faster for big jobs. You can get any type of cutting/grinding wheels for it. It's usually easier and faster to cut steel with it than by torch. I rarely use my torch anymore except for big jobs.
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Old 11-30-2007, 12:09 PM   #156
mark1305
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgas
..snip... A good handy tool is a heavy duty angle grinder. I used to use an air powered cutting tool which I still use for intricate work, but my Dewalt 4" grinder is faster for big jobs. You can get any type of cutting/grinding wheels for it. It's usually easier and faster to cut steel with it than by torch. I rarely use my torch anymore except for big jobs.
+1 on every single point he made.
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Old 11-30-2007, 12:21 PM   #157
mark1305
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In addition to the angle grinder for cutting, I save old & cheap circular saws after the bearings start to rattle but the still run. Fit a 7 inch metal cutting blade, and go to town on angle, flat and round stock.

If you are using a saw with plastic housing, be prepared for the plastic around the front of the blade guard to melt and occasionaly catch fire from the hot sparks being thrown off the blade. Yeah, I use these outside.

Speaking of torches for big cutting - I can't make a steady cut for crap usually. I saved a 20 inch piece of angle from a project that just happens to hold the cutting tips exactly the right height from the workpiece with the torch laid on the taller edge right next to the tip/head. I smoothed and polished that edge and usually put a fresh piece of smooth tape over it each job to avoid wear on the torch mixer tube that rides on it. Straight and smooth cuts now
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Old 11-30-2007, 12:32 PM   #158
boxertwin
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Ditto with the television set! We purchased a new LCD tv for the living room and the next day my wife 'informed' me that a fella from her office was going to stop by to 'remove' our old 27" tv set. I promptly informed her that if that happened she could find the new LCD tv in the workshop!
Now I have a 27" tv in the workshop.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GreaseMonkey
Upgrade the stereo in your house, and move the old one into the shop.

Much easier to do that way than it is to consider buying something of the same quality dedicated just for the shop.
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Old 11-30-2007, 12:44 PM   #159
boxertwin
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Awesome

Walrenting! Those fuckers deserve it!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Allgonoshow
Make yourself two, maybe three babies. After a couple of years, their tiny hands will be a big asset in the shop.

Also, buy EVERYTHING from Walmart. Then take it back immediately when you are done with it. Saves a lot of space. I call it Walrenting.
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Old 11-30-2007, 12:57 PM   #160
boxertwin
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Thank you!

Muy Bien!



Quote:
Originally Posted by calgaryjeff
And if you are really super cheap, pirate the magnet off of one of the old speakers that you pulled out of your high school era Camero. You don need no fancy schmancy chrome bowl......just a magnet.

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Old 12-09-2007, 02:55 PM   #161
Iron socks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by worldrider555
To Get rid of rust on parts and tools, use the electrolysis method

1. Get a Large Plastic Tub
2. Fill it up with water.
3. For every gallon of water add washing soda. (or baking soda)
4. Put rusted part in tub.
5. Put a piece of iron or stainless steel in the tub.
6. Hook the negative end of a battery charger to the part to be cleaned, and the positive to the piece of iron.
7.It should start to bubble, let sit for a few hours, and pull out and all the rust should be able to be wiped off with a paper towel.

Works great, just did it to a nail pull i left outside
How much soda do you add per gallon of water?
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Old 12-09-2007, 03:50 PM   #162
worldrider555
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iron socks
How much soda do you add per gallon of water?
sorry about that its 1 tbsp per gallon, a little more wont hurt
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Old 12-09-2007, 04:42 PM   #163
PackRat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305
........ a 20 inch piece of angle from a project that just happens to hold the cutting tips exactly the right height from the workpiece........
Mark, I do the same thing with a small hose clamp on the cutting tip so I can adjust it for height above the workpiece and the clamp rests on the angle straight edge. It also helps if you're cutting a bevel edge.


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Old 12-10-2007, 07:44 AM   #164
Jerry Atrick
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[quote=GreaseMonkey]Upgrade the stereo in your house, and move the old one into the shop.

Or upgrade the stereo in the house, then move the furniture into the shop and the tools into the house.
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Old 12-11-2007, 05:11 PM   #165
KLboxeR
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Oh, got a good one this time

Go and raid your grandmothers sewing room and steal her "seam ripper". It's a small tool designed to separate seams but works even better for opening up wiring harnesses and looms. Here's one for a whopping buck fiddy if'n you don't want to rip off grandma:

http://sewtrue.com/Store/Deluxe-Seam-Ripper-P482.html

Being the ass that I am, I had to have the Snap-On version of this and I paid dearly for it It looks exactly the same You just slip it into the harnes and the little hook cutter will open it up without damaging the wire and without the need to unwrap 10 miles of electrical tape

I also picked up this plug separator for pulling modular automotive plugs apart. I bet you could make one out of a pickle fork from the kitchen:

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item....re&dir=catalog
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