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Old 09-25-2011, 03:35 PM   #1621
EvilRoySlade
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Talking Consumption / Efficiency

Hello fellow Sherpa's, today I ran out of gas. I'm a new 2000 super sherpa owner and learning the hard way about fuel consumption. My little 110 mile ride along the Mississippi river was perfect, sun was shining, no wind or rain and lot's of animal tracks in the muddy muck the flood waters left behind. Butttt I did not have to walk home because the little beast has a reserve tank. I had to manually turn the little fuel lever thingy to get home. I promised myself to never get caught like that again. So when I got home and opened up my Super Sherpa Forum to learn more and to avoid other sherpa suprises and disasters I got on this thread discussion about fuel consumption and efficiency. After reading it I did what all geniuses do when digesting new complex terms, I went to WIKIPEDIA and became enlightened with their definitions.
Buttttt I didn't need WIKIPEDIA definitions, the context of this forum discussion was I thought how far can I go on a gallon of gas without and with carburetor jet changes. Thanks to Sequoia trial rides I know how many gallons of fuel his bike will consume to travel 127 miles and after my ride I'm aware how enefficient my bike is running out of gas after 110 miles. Now I will be consumed with how to get my bike to efficiently consume less gas.

Here is WIKIPEDIA definition:::

In the context of transport, fuel efficiency or fuel economy, is the energy efficiency of a particular vehicle, and is given as a ratio of distance travelled per unit of fuel consumed. Fuel efficiency is expressed in miles per gallon (mpg) (prevalent in the USA and UK, using their respective definitions of a gallon) or kilometres per litre (km/L) (prevalent in the Netherlands and in several Latin America and Asian countries such as Brazil, India and Japan). The reciprocal ratio, "fuel consumption", is usually expressed in liters per 100 kilometers (L/100 km) (common in Europe, Canada, New Zealand and Australia) or litres per mil (Norway/Sweden).
Variations on a vehicle's fuel efficiency include weight-specific efficiency for freight, and passenger-specific efficiency (vehicle efficiency / number of passengers).

My thanks go to Sequoia for doing and sharing his experience with the carb jets tuning, my confused reaction for CAT0020 goes from wanting to understand and appreciate his point to not caring.

Evil Roy Slade: I learned a valuable lesson today. Never trust a pretty girl, or a lonely midget.
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Old 09-25-2011, 04:06 PM   #1622
Sequoia
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Nice job on the tool tube instalation. I've been thinking about mounting one myself, the original is definitely lacking space.
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Old 09-25-2011, 04:13 PM   #1623
Sequoia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilRoySlade View Post
Hello fellow Sherpa's, today I ran out of gas. I'm a new 2000 super sherpa owner and learning the hard way about fuel consumption. My little 110 mile ride along the Mississippi river was perfect, sun was shining, no wind or rain and lot's of animal tracks in the muddy muck the flood waters left behind. Butttt I did not have to walk home because the little beast has a reserve tank. I had to manually turn the little fuel lever thingy to get home. I promised myself to never get caught like that again. So when I got home and opened up my Super Sherpa Forum to learn more and to avoid other sherpa suprises and disasters I got on this thread discussion about fuel consumption and efficiency. After reading it I did what all geniuses do when digesting new complex terms, I went to WIKIPEDIA and became enlightened with the their definitions.
Buttttt I didn't need WIKIPEDIA definitions, the context of this forum discussion was I thought how far can I go on a gallon of gas without and with carburetor jet changes. Thanks to eepegez trial rides I know how many gallons of fuel his bike will consume to travel 127 miles and after my ride I'm aware how enefficient my bike is running out of gas after 110 miles. Now I will be consumed with how to get my bike to efficiently consume less gas.

Here is WIKIPEDIA definition:::

In the context of transport, fuel efficiency or fuel economy, is the energy efficiency of a particular vehicle, and is given as a ratio of distance travelled per unit of fuel consumed. Fuel efficiency is expressed in miles per gallon (mpg) (prevalent in the USA and UK, using their respective definitions of a gallon) or kilometres per litre (km/L) (prevalent in the Netherlands and in several Latin America and Asian countries such as Brazil, India and Japan). The reciprocal ratio, "fuel consumption", is usually expressed in liters per 100 kilometers (L/100 km) (common in Europe, Canada, New Zealand and Australia) or litres per mil (Norway/Sweden).
Variations on a vehicle's fuel efficiency include weight-specific efficiency for freight, and passenger-specific efficiency (vehicle efficiency / number of passengers).

My thanks go to eepegez for doing and sharing his experience with the carb jets tuning, my confused reaction for CAt0020 goes from wanting to understand and appreciate his point to not caring.

Evil Roy Slade: I learned a valuable lesson today. Never trust a pretty girl, or a lonely midget.
Well you're probably pretty close, because my fuel usually runs out at 110 miles & then I have to switch to reserve, but on the last tank I went 120 miles before switching to reserve. I just checked my tires with a slime gage that you can adjust the pressure with while it's still on the stem and it said they were around 16-18 lbs so I raised each tire to 20 lbs. the other gage that just slides out said it was a little higher but I think i'm going to use the new one from now on.
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Old 09-25-2011, 04:20 PM   #1624
Moto13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XRWilly View Post

That looks as professional as you can make it. GREAT JOB!!

Where did you find that edging - I need some of THAT!!
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Old 09-25-2011, 05:12 PM   #1625
EvilRoySlade
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Question

QUOTE]
Where can I get that sidestand wheel thing?
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Old 09-25-2011, 05:44 PM   #1626
tomatoe333
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilRoySlade View Post
Hello fellow Sherpa's, today I ran out of gas. I'm a new 2000 super sherpa owner and learning the hard way about fuel consumption. My little 110 mile ride along the Mississippi river was perfect, sun was shining, no wind or rain and lot's of animal tracks in the muddy muck the flood waters left behind. Butttt I did not have to walk home because the little beast has a reserve tank.
My experience w/ the Sherpa tank was that it was 1.6 gallons from full to reserve. There's about another 0.3 gallon in each side of the tank in reserve, but you can only draw down the left side without stopping, and tipping the bike over to the left.

I emptied a full tank completely into a gas can when I did the petcock swap on mine (XT225 petcock - no vacuum doohickey), and I got a smidge over 2 gallons out of the tank.

So 1.6 gallons, 110 miles, you're not doing bad, at just under 69 MPG.
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Old 09-25-2011, 05:50 PM   #1627
katumo_jtb
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Nice write up on the tool tube thing. FYI a little solvent and some scotch-brite will get rid of that yellow writing, if you don't want it on there
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Old 09-25-2011, 06:12 PM   #1628
fried okra
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Automotive/mechanical engineer here too.

Ran two tanks of fuel thru my 2000 Sherpa today and got 82 and 84 MPG respectively doing mix of gravel roads and paved back roads at speeds up to 65 mph on occasion. My 2003 Sherpa does about the same as far as fuel consumption. Both have one size larger on the pilot jet and main jet.

Seems the mileage was about the same before I went upsize on both jets on both bikes but they didn't run nearly as well.

What more is there to say.

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Old 09-25-2011, 06:38 PM   #1629
Sequoia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilRoySlade View Post
QUOTE]
Where can I get that sidestand wheel thing?
Roy, I think those things are dollies if i'm not mistaken, you can probably find them at a local hardware store.
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Old 09-25-2011, 06:54 PM   #1630
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Originally Posted by XRWilly View Post
Uh…well…I installed my $4.99 tool tube today.

Before shot, you’ve all seen this.

So the manual canister is like a bajillion times bigger than the factory tool tube.

As you know, the KL has a decent bracket for the factory tool tube and I thought I’d make use of that since it’s already there and seemed like a good place for the bigger tube. So I just needed to make a mounting plate. Here are the ingredients. I got a sheet of 16 gauge steel plate. That’s just about as thick as I want to cut. It’s sturdy enough; no flex in the final product. I also had some rubber edging to provide some protection to the edges…some epoxy to glue it to the plate and some hardware. The edging is the kind that has an aluminum lining so it molds and hugs around corners. I use this stuff for restoring old seat pans, works good for that and did pretty good for this application. I suppose you could skip this if you really felt strongly about it.

Then we designed a template using a thin aluminum sheet I had laying around. I like making templates because you can play around with positioning the final mounting plate (like my helper is doing in the second photo), or whatever you’re working on.

Using the template, I then cut the steel plate using a regular saber saw with a metal-cutting blade and drilled the holes for the bracket and the tube. I then deburred and cleaned up the edges of the mounting plate with my dremel and some grinding bits…then some rattle can paint…and lastly, I installed the edging, first forcing epoxy along the groove. The edging goes on real tight, but I suppose if it slipped off it would be down in the sprocket/chain. Essentially, you just tap the edging on with a ballpeen hammer.

Best laid plans, at this point I decided that I wanted the bracket a little further out so I added a couple half inch spacers between the mounting plate and the bracket. Of course that required some other bolts and all I had was some longer bolts, so I had to cut them back to clear the tire should it ever compress that high.

Bolt on the tool tube to the mounting plate, cut and put some rubber bumpers on the bracket bolts. Oh, good shot of the spacers change-of-mind in the second photo.



And viola! There you go…it was an extremely “efficient” process.
XRWilly, Not to change the subject, but I was looking at your rack, I have seen them before but not a close up look at the way it mounts & I was thinking with a little work you could make a slider out of it if you wanted to anyway. At the mounting points where the tubes are parallel to each other you might have to add a little material to the front or back but if you milled a horizontal slot or drilled additional mounting holes it would give you the ability to move it forward or back if you wanted to. And if you had a top case you could lean back against it, makes for a somewhat more comfy ride sometimes. Just a thought.
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Old 09-26-2011, 08:50 AM   #1631
XRWilly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sequoia View Post
Nice job on the tool tube installation. I've been thinking about mounting one myself, the original is definitely lacking space.
Thanks! Yeah, you can get some real tools in this one like a ratchet, decent pair of pliers/vice grips and have plenty of room for other necessities like tire repair kits and stuff like that. I still think a good tool wrap is in order though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moto13 View Post
Where did you find that edging - I need some of THAT!!
It’s called Trim Lok and comes in lots of different sizes, textures and colors. This stuff has a rubber exterior and an aluminum lining so it really keeps its form when you shape it around corners. Here’s a Link to the Company, but find a distributor or a vendor like on eBay and you can buy it by the foot and cheaper. I’ve been using this stuff for years, lining the edges of metal seat pans on old bikes I restore.


Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilRoySlade View Post
Where can I get that sidestand wheel thing?
Yup, what Sequoia said, they’re tri-dolly casters…eight bucks at hardware stores and they come in lots of sizes.
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Old 09-26-2011, 09:10 AM   #1632
Moto13
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Thanks for replying. Can't wait to get my hands on some of that stuff.
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Old 09-26-2011, 05:43 PM   #1633
XRWilly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sequoia View Post
XRWilly, Not to change the subject, but I was looking at your rack, I have seen them before but not a close up look at the way it mounts & I was thinking with a little work you could make a slider out of it if you wanted to anyway. At the mounting points where the tubes are parallel to each other you might have to add a little material to the front or back but if you milled a horizontal slot or drilled additional mounting holes it would give you the ability to move it forward or back if you wanted to. And if you had a top case you could lean back against it, makes for a somewhat more comfy ride sometimes. Just a thought.
I looked this over tonight and this could be done. The tail lights would have to be relocated though, which wouldn’t be a problem. It’s a TCI Borrego Rack. That would have been a nice touch for TCI to have done the extension and slots on the base rack.
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Old 09-27-2011, 08:32 PM   #1634
lgottler
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I just got back from a 947mile trip through Michigan's Upper Peninsula over 5 days (2 half and 3 full). We trailered both bikes 5 hours to St. Ignace and parked the truck. We left from there on the bikes and did a large loop clockwise. I thought I would post up what worked, what didn't and general thoughts.

First, I'm 210 lbs without gear and 5' 11" with a 30" inseam for reference. I have a 2000 Sherpa with a 15t front sprocket and I did the Dr. Jekyl carb mods, everything else is cosmetic or for holding stuff.

We averaged about 230 miles per day of riding. We did 30% dirt road/2-track and 70% paved back roads. I had a best of 75mpg and a worst of 64mpg. We usually were on the road by 9am and traveled until 7pm, stopping for lunch and fuel and some pics.

What worked:
- The bike did far better than I was expecting it to. I feared the 15t sprocket would be too much, but by treating 6th gear as overdrive, I have no complaints about the 250cc power for 55mph road travel.
- Dirt road/2 track performance makes up for any high speed shortfalls. Very easy to flip it about.
- Low seat height is really nice, I don't have to tip toe and aim for flat spots to stop at.
- With roughly 30lbs of gear (not counting my tools I always carry), I only noticed the extra weight for about 1 day, then I forgot it was there. Bike handled it well
- 6 gears. Love. It.
- Pelican case, secure and waterproof. The rack on top worked awesome and the case was very convenient.
- My spare fuel bottles. I had to use them 3 times. Glad I added them!
- Moose handguards. I was amazed by how warm my hands stayed with vented leather gloves in 50 degree air! Keeping the wind off 'em helps alot.



What didn't work for me:
- The stock fuel tank size. With 30+ miles between nearest gas stations and sometimes 60+ miles between stops, you sometimes had to fill up at 50 miles to make sure you had enough!
- Stock seat. I added a Walmart seat cushion, but it didn't help enough. I could do the first 100 miles O.K., but from then on I only could put 40-50 then progressively less before I needed frequent butt breaks.
-Shinko 244 tires. It took too much change in pressure to make the tires work well enough. I tried 22 and liked it for pavement only and settled on 17psi for a street/trail pressure and I had to drop to 10 rear and 8 front to make them grip in the dirt only sections. It was SCARY hitting any gravel or dirt at 22 psi, so the constant up and down pressure changes got old quick.
- Garmin eTrex Legend Color. Just too small to use on a bike. It works, but hard to see unless you stop to zoom in and out and pan. Screen just not big enough. Plus all my routes wouldn't fit on it.

My buddy was on a DRZ400 and we both had a blast, he sometimes wished for a 6th gear and I sometimes wished for more cc's. The only times I wanted a larger bike was when we hit a head wind along with hills. I had to drop to 5th and stay at 50mph on the big hills and winds really tossed the bike about. But that was about 2% of the entire trip.

Unfortunately, this was kind of a test for both of us to see if we could do a multi-day trip out west or down south and we both realized that doing back roads and avoiding the highways, while fun, just won't work for trying to do a longer trip with short vacations. So, I'm going to clean the sherpa up from the trip and put her for sale soon. I'll be looking for another bike with more highway oomph so I can take those longer trips in the shorter time frames without needing to tow the bike halfway!





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Old 09-27-2011, 10:58 PM   #1635
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Informative ride report, much appreciated.
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