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Old 09-26-2007, 11:25 AM   #31
R-dubb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirty_sanchez
I was knee deep in a rather detailed response to the blind hole and the lubricant question, fat fingered something and lost the whole response.
I figure your fat fingers fit into many blind holes, but knee deep is another matter entirely.
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Old 09-26-2007, 08:22 PM   #32
boatworker
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Dirty,

Thanks for all the info. I really enjoy it when you chime in on these threads.

A question. Since the air space between the threads is filled with this plastic that hardens, would the Blue be an effective sealant for pipe threads as opposed to teflon tape or one of the liquid pipe dopes?

I had to reconfigure the fittings on a propane regulator on a custormers boat the other day and it looked like they were assembled using red Loctite or something similar. It was a real bitch getting them apart. I had never thought of using it instead of pipe dope, but from your explainations it seems like it would work well.

Thanks,
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Old 09-27-2007, 05:38 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boatworker
Dirty,

Thanks for all the info. I really enjoy it when you chime in on these threads.

A question. Since the air space between the threads is filled with this plastic that hardens, would the Blue be an effective sealant for pipe threads as opposed to teflon tape or one of the liquid pipe dopes?

I had to reconfigure the fittings on a propane regulator on a custormers boat the other day and it looked like they were assembled using red Loctite or something similar. It was a real bitch getting them apart. I had never thought of using it instead of pipe dope, but from your explainations it seems like it would work well.

Thanks,
You're absolutely right about using something that is labled as a threadlocker as a thread sealant if you have to use what you have.

I've heard too many nightmares about folks destroying parts while attempting to disassemble them after someone else has used a red threadlocker for assembly. Just remember Red anything when it comes to threadlockers means it'll be a screaming biotch to remove.

While you could use a blue theadlocker as a thread sealant, there are better choices. My workhorse is 567PST. Reliable thread root filling up to roughly 2", You can reposition parts up to roughly 3 hours after assembly, Service Removable (behaves like a blue threadlocker), won't gall stainless, 400F, 10,000psi, plus the added lubricity of 10 micron Teflon particles.

Being aware of Teflon particle size in any threadsealant you use is extremely important. Most every brand thread sealant you run across that is white contains Teflon particles whose purpose is to add assembly lubrication. Most of us don't know how large these teflon particles really are.

Sooo, what happens if you have some sort of fine filtration hydraulic system, something that's 5 microns absolute, and we're using either the 567PST or some other Brand X. Major expensive damage will likely occurr due to the potential restrictions.

Imagine trying to shove marbles through a screen door while thinking about particulate size.

A fine thread hydraulic/pneumatic sealant like the 545 is the suggested thread sealant in all applications, even stainless, for any system with filtration finer than 10 microns.

I am ADVriders very own real live unofficial official Loctite factory rep, giver of technical support.

And I approved this message.

Dirty
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:36 PM   #34
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on that vein, would the blue or the 567PST work on airhead petcock attachment threads? i.e., is that stuff resistant to gasoline?
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:37 PM   #35
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ps. great thread.
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Old 09-27-2007, 01:00 PM   #36
dirty_sanchez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datchew
on that vein, would the blue or the 567PST work on airhead petcock attachment threads? i.e., is that stuff resistant to gasoline?
As your spiritual advisor and chief purveyor of machinery adhesives, I'd go with the 567 for the simple reason that it's a heavier bodied material. It's toothpaste thick and stands up just fine to any type of fuel or oil.

Like any sort of gasketing, threadlocking, threadsealing application it's strongly suggested you start off with clean dry threads.

If a blue threadlocker is all you got, dog will hunt.

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Old 09-27-2007, 07:51 PM   #37
boatworker
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How important is the activator when using the 567?
Most of my stuff is potable water fittings with pressures under 100psi. Some gas (propane) again around 100psi. Max pipe size is 1".

Thank you.

Thank you very much.
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boatworker screwed with this post 09-27-2007 at 08:12 PM
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Old 09-28-2007, 03:07 AM   #38
dirty_sanchez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boatworker
How important is the activator when using the 567?
Most of my stuff is potable water fittings with pressures under 100psi. Some gas (propane) again around 100psi. Max pipe size is 1".

Thank you.

Thank you very much.
If you are talking about using Primer N, you're adding an extra step that's really not needed. 100 psi is chicken feed, 1" dia NPT or straight cut threads will be fine. 567 is NSF approved and goes well with corn flakes.

Using Primer N or the Primer T are both primers that are solvent based, a killer cleaner/degreaser along with copper salts. Why Copper? The copper is a very active metal which when sprayed onto an inactive metal surface like stainless overloads the substrate with active metal ions that cause the anearobic product to cure.

So, why to use either of the Primers listed above?
1. Clean a substrate
2. Speed the cure to get the equipment up and running faster
3. Activate an inactive metal, like stainless, cad plating, galvanized, aluminum, etc.
4. Overload the substrate with copper ions for larger thread gap applications (like a 2" NPT fitting)

When piping gets upwards of 2" in dia., this is when we start seeing flanges because the thread roots are too large to reliably seal well enough to get any sort of pressure resistance.

Sometimes we might use a primer in colder temperatures (Louisiana has 3 of these days per year) to kick start the curing process.

Any of the anaerobics like threadlockers or threadsealants will stress crack plastic piping faster than you can shiver a timber, so only use those products on metal fittings and threads. Clean dry fittings and threads.

567 is a great catch-all choice for plumbing a boat that handles gasoline, diesel, potable water, grey water, oils, etc. Go to loctite.com and search for the fluid compatibility chart for more specific liquid compatibility.

Dirty
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Old 09-29-2007, 05:29 PM   #39
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OK, I am convinced. Off to Grainger on Monday to pick up a gallon.

Thanks,
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Old 09-30-2007, 02:29 PM   #40
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. . . . . . . miss something ? ? ?

Uh, okay this stuff is great and a necessity . . . . .

So, does anyone have a mail order source for BLUE LOCTITE that is, let's say, cheaper than my local hardware store?

Thanks.
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Old 10-02-2007, 10:43 AM   #41
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Thanks Dirty, I thought I knew what I was doing with loctite but I didn't know shit.. Thank again.
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Old 10-02-2007, 11:21 AM   #42
dirty_sanchez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norcal1
Thanks Dirty, I thought I knew what I was doing with loctite but I didn't know shit.. Thank again.
Don't feel bad.

I'm still trying to hone my lobotomy skills.

Dirty
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Old 10-03-2007, 03:42 PM   #43
roadrunner18
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loctite 243

I mistakenly bought loctite 242 instead of 243 for my new brake rotors. From what I've been able to find, they seem the same, or at least very close. Will 242 work instead of 243?

thanks
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Old 10-03-2007, 05:27 PM   #44
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I can see no reason to prefer one over the other. In fact, it would seem the 242 is the military spec version of the good old blue Loctite 243. Both have the same applications listed in the Loctite data sheets.
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Old 10-04-2007, 06:01 AM   #45
dirty_sanchez
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Do not despair.

Both of these threadlockers have very similar qualities and have very similar breakloose and prevailing torques.

243 is more oil tolerant-meaning it works best on "as received" fasteners which come slightly oiled. It is a newer alternative to the 40 year old 242.

When using 243, you don't have to clean and degrease the fastener before applying the threadlocker like you have to when using 242.

243 is a threadlocker that does not require you to shake the container to mix the contents.

We already have a Loctite thread here:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=265016

I propose we keep all threadlocking, gasketing, threadsealing, bonding questions in the Loctite Thread.

Hey Mods- could you move this thread on to the Loctite thread please?

I am ADVriders very own unofficial official Loctite factory rep and I approved this message.

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