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Old 10-24-2012, 07:07 AM   #526
cat
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Something i've been wondering about, related to brake disc bolts...
For Ti disc bolts, bolts (like Pro-Bolt), they always say to use anti-seize because of the galling of Ti. But that bothers me a bit - for obvious reasons. So, i wonder, what is the expert opinion on it?
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Old 10-24-2012, 03:23 PM   #527
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cat View Post
Something i've been wondering about, related to brake disc bolts...
For Ti disc bolts, bolts (like Pro-Bolt), they always say to use anti-seize because of the galling of Ti. But that bothers me a bit - for obvious reasons. So, i wonder, what is the expert opinion on it?
Stainless and Titanium are both very sticky metals. Not sticky like a piece of tape, but sticky as male and female threads are placed under high sliding loads.

Titanium is stickier than stainless. Because of this stickiness some sort of lubricant is strongly encouraged to lessen the tendency of these metals from cold welding themselves together and causing headaches. For threaded stainless fittings used to seal fluid or air, if some sort of lubricant isn't used, you tighten the widget up and hear a creak, or feel grabbiness of some sort, and the fitting is gonna leak. The creak or grabbiness is the slow moving high load surfaces destroying all sealing ability.

In the application of a brake rotor being bolted to a hub, there's a tremendous amount of loading taking place. This side or shear loading of the threaded fastener actually stretches all components. None of us have the tools to measure the stretching and side loading. If we were to use an anti-seize in this application, grease and metal dust will allow you to tighten the fastener up to the point the proper clamp load has been introduced......BUT, nothing worth mentioning is used to fill the gap created between the male and female thread roots. You're depending on the elasticity of the threaded fastener to maintain a sufficient clamp load. Repeated side loading of the threaded fastener (every time you apply the brakes) might cause loosening. I'd rather not take that risk.

Earlier in this thread I get into the purpose of an anti-seize as it relates to slowing/stopping galvanic corrosion-you'll learn more once you find that post.

Just like an anti-seize, by using a threadlocker on the other hand will give you the same lubricity to achieve the same clamp load, you'll still be dealing with the same degree of fastener elasticity....BUT as side loading is induced (brake application) and as the rotor goes through heating and cooling cycles, you'll never loose the clamp load because the airspace contained between the male and female thread roots is fully supported by a hard thermoset plastic.

Dig?

Dirty
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Old 10-26-2012, 03:27 AM   #528
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Thanks, Dirty, just what i needed. I'll get to finding that post on anti-seize later today.
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Old 10-26-2012, 02:34 PM   #529
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dirty_sanchez, i hope you get paid extra for this, or at least you do it on work time. You are the best damn factory rep i have heard of. I always read this thread, and you have the most thorough, correct, no-bullshit answers around. Thanks for the education in loctite.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:35 PM   #530
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Originally Posted by idscarecrow
dirty_sanchez, i hope you get paid extra for this, or at least you do it on work time. You are the best damn factory rep i have heard of. I always read this thread, and you have the most thorough, correct, no-bullshit answers around. Thanks for the education in loctite.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:03 PM   #531
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Thanks Guys-

If you don't dig your gig you need to find another...and I'm not looking.

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Old 11-18-2012, 08:08 PM   #532
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As many others have said, thanks for a great resource you're providing here.

I'm rebuilding a '64 Jeep with tapered axle shafts. The hubs are attached to the axle shafts by a tight fitting taper and a big nut. There is a keyway too, but you really want the taper to carry the torque. In the factory service manual (from the 60s), it suggests that a loose hub can be fixed by applying white lead to the axle shaft on assembly. White lead was once used as a thread locker, but surely there is a superior product for this. It also needs to be removable without heating the parts too much. What would you recommend?

Thanks very much!

Exploded view of axle:
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Old 11-18-2012, 09:02 PM   #533
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Ob- I'd go with something called 660 Quick metal. It's made for keyed assys similar to this sort of application.

Clean and degrease all surfaces, draw a bead into the key slot, fit the key, and smear a bead across the contact area of the OD of the shaft, slide on the hub/spindle, then torque to spec within 5 minutes. Let it sit for 24 hours before going rock crawling.

For removal, you'll need a sturdy 3 jaw puller, or an enerpac hydraulic puller.

Good question, nifty project!

Dirty
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Old 11-18-2012, 09:08 PM   #534
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White lead was not a thread locker, it is a high solid paint that can build up a surface and tighten clearances.
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Old 11-19-2012, 06:46 AM   #535
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Originally Posted by Smopho View Post
White lead was not a thread locker, it is a high solid paint that can build up a surface and tighten clearances.
Correct.

The best machined fittings are ones with a very high percentage of metal to metal contact between the mating surfaces-be it cylindrical engagement or in the case of a threaded assy, threaded engagement.

Years back white lead was used but it went the way of cork gaskets as adhesive technology outpaced their usefulness.

660 Quick Metal is designed to fill surface imperfections of cylindrical machined fits.

It's WAY too strong to ever be used as a threadlocker....everyone..consider yourselves warned.

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Old 11-19-2012, 10:35 AM   #536
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If the taper's not damaged, you shouldn't need anything more than to make sure the taper's clean and dry before assembly. The joint drives through friction between the axle and hub, not the key, which is there purely as a locator. Tighten to the specified torque and drive for a day or two, then re-torque because the joint may have settled a bit. Once the torque remains constant, you're done.
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Old 11-19-2012, 04:20 PM   #537
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On my old ('78) airhead, Loctite 290 (green) and Vibra-tite VC3 are the two thread lockers used most. I always wondered if Loctite makes a product similar to Vibra-tite VC3? My admiration for the product comes from reusing the same fastener without having to reapply, which seems to happen often on this old bike.

I recently used the green to help with a leaking cylinder head push-rod tube oil seeping problem. Good stuff. The stick loctite (blue) sounds like something I must have - just because.
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Old 11-19-2012, 06:38 PM   #538
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Machines are made up of a series of components, and when one sub-component fails-the machine tends to fail. Failures normally occur where two components are attached to each other.

Unitizing assemblies with appropriate machinery adhesives makes for a safe and reliable machine.

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Old 11-19-2012, 06:43 PM   #539
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I got to tryout the stick when they were just in the evaluation stage. Actually, they gave me so much that I still have it ten years later. I prefer it. Easy to use. No mess. Doesn't deteriorate in cold/heat like the liquid.
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Old 11-19-2012, 07:06 PM   #540
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I got to tryout the stick when they were just in the evaluation stage. Actually, they gave me so much that I still have it ten years later. I prefer it. Easy to use. No mess. Doesn't deteriorate in cold/heat like the liquid.
Me too-and I'm lucky enough to choose the liquid, the stick, or the new threadlocker on a tape.

The sticks are just way to easy to use. The only thing you can't use the stick on is with a blind hole.

And when I say "Blind Hole" I'm not talking about Dirty Denise

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