ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Trip Planning > Americas
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-15-2007, 08:08 PM   #1
FXRocket OP
Phoneticide Squad
 
FXRocket's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Hoosier
Oddometer: 5,315
Indy to the Grand Canyon. first trip & need guidance..

I am lost...

I got this R1100GS to take a trip of a life time, for me anyway. I have not spent any real time camping in my life and most of my motorcycling has been regional to say the least, it's time for me to see the USA.

As I said the bike will be a 1998 R1100GS rolling on Anakees, I do have a Garmin 2610, large tank bag, wolfman tank panniers, big lights and a decent tail bag in place of the rear pillion, and BMW system cases. I also have a rack behind the rear seat area to strap things down with a metal tool box mounted under that rack. So I think Ive enough space for stuff.


A pic.



I will need help in all areas for this, things like what to take, what kinda tent and sleeping bag etc.. I have been reading up on the basics like stoves and other equipment, so I wont rehash all of that now, but will read any comments. I will definitely try out my packing and my gear with a few weekend trips closer to home first.

__________________Anyway__________________

Late spring 08 I would like to ride to the Grand Canyon as I have never seen it. I drove a truck 20 years ago and never got to see it and that has always bothered me, now I would like to ride to it and camp there a few days and ride around in the dirt and explore (is that allowed?), and I have questions.

I plan on taking the bigger roads till I get to Texas to save a bit of time. Interstate is doable, but 2 lane highway would be preferred. I have driven the US 40 route many (to many) times, but I don't mind doing it to save some time on the front end.

From TX on I would like to definitely stay on the 2 lane roads and see the countryside. I don't need an exact route, I am willing to be flexible and let the GPS keep me loosely on route but do not know where in the Grand Canyon to pick for a destination?

What should my destination be coming from the east to get a good view and some private time away from RV'ers and other campers but no so desolate that I cant get a cheap motel for a night if needed.

Anyone here done this trip from east of the Mississippi have any threads or tips to get me started on a plan?

I need some ideas on where good places are to stop and camp or cheap motels along the way that fit in with rider fatigue etc..

I really don't know where to begin, it seems I am lost before I even leave.
__________________
If you say "Gullible" slowly it sounds like "Oranges".
FXRocket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 08:42 AM   #2
damasovi
Beastly Adventurer
 
damasovi's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Ensenada, Baja California
Oddometer: 2,572
Quote:
Originally Posted by FXRocket
I am lost...
I will need help in all areas for this, things like what to take, what kinda tent and sleeping bag etc.. I have been reading up on the basics like stoves and other equipment, so I wont rehash all of that now, but will read any comments. I will definitely try out my packing and my gear with a few weekend trips closer to home first.
Amigo
1) DO IT
2) Travel in the US is simple, there are plenty of options for all bugets.
3) Buy a Randall Mc*** map, the biggest you can get at your local Wal Mart, Kmart Target o what ever it will costo you less than 10 USD and will give you tons of info on the general stuff,
4) If you feal like spending $30-50 then buy some software, I have the MS street and trips and it gives a lot of info on gas stations, hotels, camping and the like.
5) Go to sporting store and see everthing they have, take some brochures and read.

That is all to start you with. Others will tell you more I am so sure

Damasovi
damasovi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 09:35 AM   #3
kevrider
Gnarly Adventurer
 
kevrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: reno
Oddometer: 274
the ten dollar atlas is good advice. it will show state parks with camping sites so you can figure out your target destination for the day in the morning or whenever, then adapt as the day unfolds.

you really don't need to plan ahead for each stop. you look at the map and target a camp groud or a town of you want a room. just don't wait until you're bleary-eyed to call it a day.

the atlas also shows a lot of scenic routes.

get off the interstate in MO/AR to play in the Ozarks.

South Rim and North Rim are the destinations. South Rim is more civilized and may be best for your first camping trip. do not plan to get a hotel room at the last minute near the Grand Canyon. if you expect to need one, book in advance. rooms are cheaper in Page, might be a good stop the day before or after the Canyon.

google "national park service" and click to the GC pages.

the best way to explore the GC is not by bike on dirt roads, it is by foot on dirt paths. get some hiking boots, a hat and a camelbak.

get a 2-person tent, not a single or bivy. you need room for your stuff.

camping in national parks is fairly comfortable and painless. they have all of the amenities; hot water (you may have to pay in quarters) and laundry.... some state parks are similar, some are primitive.

you don't have to cook while camping. i never cook. it saves money, though.

you may have more storage space than you need. keep it simple. don't bring the house.

go one way, return another way. see different stuff.

go to Utah. if you have time, those national parks are worth a stop.

if you can go before Memorial Day, you will not regret it.

be flexible.



most importantly, relax. it's not as daunting a task as it seems. enjoy the planning. enjoy the ride.
kevrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 02:08 PM   #4
Lucky Explorer
Traveled the world
 
Lucky Explorer's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2001
Location: Northern Arizona, usa
Oddometer: 296
Grand Canyon, Az.

Not sure of your entry to Texas, but if you want two ways, one in and one out. Try to get to Las Cruces, NM (maybe 180 out of Minneral Wells?) and over to Clifton, Az up 191 (525 switchbacks in 100 miles) up to 260 and over to Payson, Forest Hwy 3 to Flagstaff and 180 to the South Rim.
The Grand Canyon Village is the main area on the rim, Tusayan is the village 8miles south. Rooms abound, expensive and sometimes full months in advance. Flagstaff almost always has rooms. 2000 available at the canyon area. Camping tough too.
Exit is via 64 to Cameron, 89 to 160 to Durango, Co. approx. 300 miles, and home from there. If you have the time 550 to 50, 285 etc. to Denver et al.
Off of 160 go to Monument Valley and Bluff and back roads to Aneth, Ismay and Cortez. Temps in N. Az are similer to SW Colorado, ie. Durango, as elev. is 7000' at GCNP.
Allen.
Lucky Explorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 06:09 PM   #5
FXRocket OP
Phoneticide Squad
 
FXRocket's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Hoosier
Oddometer: 5,315
Thanks,
It seems the north rim may be a shorter ride, but it is only open after May and is farther north and thus probably cooler in the early months... I gota ask, is it possible to just camp without having to worry about where and when? I mean to say do I have to conform to park guidelines or can I primitive camp on my own? From what I read ya gota have reservations just to camp in-season? That is not at all appealing... I really want to go where the day takes me, park my bike and set up tent. Is this possible within eyesight of the canyon anywhere?
__________________
If you say "Gullible" slowly it sounds like "Oranges".
FXRocket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 07:19 PM   #6
kevrider
Gnarly Adventurer
 
kevrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: reno
Oddometer: 274
Quote:
Originally Posted by FXRocket
From what I read ya gota have reservations just to camp in-season?
incorrect. you may make reservations for some of the campgrouds, it is not required. if you go before the holiday or arrive on a weekday, you should be able to get a spot with no problems. i've only been there twice but i've never considered getting a reservation.


the following quote is from the GCNP webpage.....
http://www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/cg-sr.htm
Quote:
Campsites are on a first come - first served - self-registration basis. The campground is usually full by early evening during the busy summer months. No reservations are accepted for campsites for the Desert View Campground at anytime.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FXRocket
north rim may be a shorter ride, but it is only open after May and is farther north and thus probably cooler in the early months.
North Rim is also 2000 feet higher in elevation.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by FXRocket
s it possible to just camp without having to worry about where and when? I mean to say do I have to conform to park guidelines or can I primitive camp on my own?
this is also from that webpage:
Quote:
Dispersed Camping: Camping "at-large" is permitted in the national forest outside the park. Camping must be at least 0.25mile/ 0.4 km away from Highway 64. Other restrictions may apply. Contact the Tusayan Ranger District, Kaibab National Forest, P.O. Box 3088, Grand Canyon, AZ 86023 or call (928) 638-2443 for information
kevrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 07:54 PM   #7
heetseeker
Hopelessly addicted
 
heetseeker's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Location: Wilton CA
Oddometer: 370
Go for it

I'll be there in late April/early May as well.
You'll need:

Tire repair kit (know how to use it)
Warm/light/stuffable sleeping bag
Mattress pad-thermarest extreme
Tent 1-2 man, the type without stakes (waterproof spray the fly)
Back packing stove and mess kit/coffee kit
extra levers-clutch/brake
tool kit
maps/gps (both)
bear spray (for ferral humans)
Good riding boots, hiking shoes too.
thermal layer
Riding gear, pants/jacket/warm gloves/cool gloves
fist aid kit
personal contact info
food kit for 2 nights (MRE's) just in case
light pants and a couple of t-shirts
Quart of oil
Troubleshooting notes
notebook/pen (for noting the stuff you don't need or forgot)
A positive,adventurous attitude.

sick-em
heetseeker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 08:02 PM   #8
Lucky Explorer
Traveled the world
 
Lucky Explorer's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2001
Location: Northern Arizona, usa
Oddometer: 296
From Mem. Day to Labor Day things are always full, and mostly from where ever Easter falls to the end of October. However, there are Nat Forests adjoining the park on either side (Kaibab N.F.) and camping is permited, fire permits needed, and usually fire threats in the seasonal times prevents a lot of this. The chances are good that you'll be fine, and I say go for it. Just remember it is REALLY popular. I lived on the S. rim for 14 years, but have always liked the North Rim. And camping in various spots there, Demonte, Jacob Lake are available too. Have fun.
Allen.
Lucky Explorer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 08:38 PM   #9
FXRocket OP
Phoneticide Squad
 
FXRocket's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Hoosier
Oddometer: 5,315
Thanks for the tips.

I am going to get a large map for the wall and start to sort out what I want to see on the way, I don't want to fly by everything of interest. Once I get past the TX panhandle I want to slow it down and enjoy it. I have no real passion for north TX or OK (BTDT). I may do the 44 to 40 run till I get into NM and try to go 2 lane and then take a different northern route back. I am going to spend the winter searching for a tent and other bits, and working on a route. I wonder how much time I should leave for this? Two weeks should do it without feeling like I am being rushed... Or should I take 3?

Stay tuned, as I may (OK will) have questions!
__________________
If you say "Gullible" slowly it sounds like "Oranges".
FXRocket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 10:22 AM   #10
DevDel
Studly Adventurer
 
DevDel's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2003
Location: Central AZ
Oddometer: 559
Just some random thoughts:

If you find yourself coming thru NM into the east side of AZ, see if you can include the Oak Creek Canyon area is just north of Sedona. Highway 89A to be specific. It's a touristy zoo during weekends and peak season, but it's a really relaxing place to camp during the week. Clear running river, incredible views, wooded, etc. Lot's of cheap, small, state run camprounds to pick from.

There are lots of shortcuts in dirt in AZ, most are perfect GS roads. Should you find yourself coming thru Payson heading east, a road called fossil creek runs out of Strawberry and goes to Camp Verde. It joins pavement close to another dirt road that will whiz you straight at Sedona, and by another great spot to camp known as Clear Creek/ Bullpen. These roads will be shown in those map books the previous poster linked.

Lots of great places in AZ, not far from the Grand Canyon. Jerome, Crown King, etc
DevDel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 01:59 PM   #11
rocker59
diplomatico di moto
 
rocker59's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: The Trans-Mississippi
Oddometer: 15,398
I have to wonder why you're going to be in Texas if you're travelling from Indianapolis, Indiana to Northern Arizona... You don't "need" to be any farther South than Interstate 40 to get there...

Personally, for a Southern route, I would use US-412 from Tulsa Westward and stay off I-40... If you're taking slab from Indy, through St. Louis and towards Tulsa, a side trip into NW Arkansas would be well worth an extra day of your time.

*Head South at Springfield, Missouri. Loop through the Ozarks, then catch US-412 West. You'll be on US-412 all the way to New Mexico... Camp at Black Mesa State Park near the Western end of Oklahoma's panhandle.

*In New Mexico, take US-64 West. It's a GREAT ride across Northern New Mexico. You could camp in Carson National Forrest campgrounds.

*Running US-64 will allow you to check out SE Utah's Canyonlands. It terminates near the Four Corners. You can primitive camp near Mexican Hat, Utah. Muley Point, Valley of the Gods...

*As far as the Grand Canyon goes, the North Rim is in a different climate zone than the South Rim. If you're wanting quiet and privacy, go to the North Rim. On the other hand, there is some cool stuff to see at the South Rim... As mentioned above, you will not find any OHV trails inside the canyon. Take your hiking boots.

*As a return trip, you should really consider running UT-12 past Bryce Canyon, over the Grand Staircase to Boulder or Torrey. Motel accomodations are affordable there. Also, there is camping at Capitol Reef...

*Pick US-40 or US-50 for your return trip across Colorado and either US-24 or US-50 across Kansas. I-70 ain't much fun...
__________________
Rocker59 (aka guzzimike), Aux Arcs (NW Arkansas)
Moto Guzzi: LeMans 1000 CI, Sport 1100, V11 LeMans Nero Corsa
IBA #24873, MGNOC #21347
“Just keep playing, no matter how weird it gets.”
rocker59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 03:10 PM   #12
GrayWolf
Lupine Rider
 
GrayWolf's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Location: Bay Area, RWC.
Oddometer: 343
If you are planning I40 anyway...

I would highly recommend doing old route 66 and skipping much of the freeway.

Yes it means a full day to get through OK but its worth it. MI and OK on the old route are tons of fun!

My buddy and I took the original RT66 trip this summer starting in Indy and it was a blast. Since it will get you where you are going anyway you may want to consider it.

Since we are local for the price of a beer or two we can give you the rundown and some GREAT maps (we will want back when you are done!) to get you there.

I was in Vegas on business this year and rode out to the canyon for the first time. It was truly awe inspiring and I plan to go many more times. If you are interested send me a PM.

-GW
__________________
GrayWolf
"I wouldn't take a million dollars for the experience but I sure wouldn't give a red cent to go through it again" -Chester Russell on building the AlCan

GrayWolf screwed with this post 11-17-2007 at 03:13 PM Reason: For some reason NONE OF MY FORMATTING TOOK! I can't remember where I put the line breaks so here goes.....
GrayWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 03:26 PM   #13
kevrider
Gnarly Adventurer
 
kevrider's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: reno
Oddometer: 274
Quote:
Originally Posted by FXRocket
Two weeks should do it without feeling like I am being
rushed... Or should I take 3?
we're tallking about a cross-country trip on a motorcycle... when is less time ever better than more time?

a few years ago, a buddy and i did a similar trip, NC to GCNP. i had to squeeze it into two weeks, so we spent the first two days on i-40. that pretty much sucked but it was the price we had to pay. at the end, it was a bit of a hustle to get back, but there were other factors as well (events to attend... and a hurricane).

had i three weeks to take, i would have taken three weeks.
kevrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 04:02 PM   #14
FXRocket OP
Phoneticide Squad
 
FXRocket's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Hoosier
Oddometer: 5,315
Rocker, thats just the kinda info I am looking for! Thanks

Greywolf, I am going to look at the 66 route also...that does sound interesting.

Kevrider, if I go by my loneseme I can take 4....

I would be open to a riding partner, I wonder if ...hmm..
__________________
If you say "Gullible" slowly it sounds like "Oranges".
FXRocket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 04:13 PM   #15
bynder
digity digity
 
bynder's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: indianapolis, in
Oddometer: 913
hhmmmmm. might have to take an FLHT. ifn we go that soon
bynder is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014