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Old 12-14-2007, 08:41 AM   #166
Bitt
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Thumb And again.... left with another nail biting cliff hanger!

Done like a true master of suspense.... tricepilot leaves us on the edge of our seats.

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Old 12-14-2007, 03:31 PM   #167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bitt
Done like a true master of suspense.... tricepilot leaves us on the edge of our seats.
Dan -

Not intending to, specifically, create these moments, but almost every day I've traveled there I've gone out of my way to meet people and find out what their "hook" into Mexico is/was. This usually ends up in a great story.

Everybody traveling there has a story, everybody has been through and/or is going through, an adventure. Everbody has a tale that can help other travelers, be it a travel tip, cautionary tale, or suggestions on where to go and what to see.

The story of what happened to this Dave is unbelieveable enough. But what happened to the guy who hit him could have been made into a Hitchcock movie. Oooops, sorry, there I go again.

Bob

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Old 12-15-2007, 09:37 PM   #168
Bitt
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Thumb Nice outlook on travelling

Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot


Everybody traveling there has a story, everybody has been through and/or is going through, an adventure. Everbody has a tale that can help other travelers, be it a travel tip, cautionary tale, or suggestions on where to go and what to see.


Bob
It is time for for my profound statement of the day.... ( saw it on a sticker )

ready.........
The Destination is the Journey
Soooo, whenever your ready - lead on
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Old 12-16-2007, 04:38 AM   #169
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The Day in Creel

Its warming up - really warming up - in Creel.

This is the Wednesday of the second week of the trip.

Tonight, we'd sleep in Divisadero. Tomorrow night would be in N. Casas Grandes, and the next night, I'd be home in my own bed.

I mention this to point out out surreal it can be to be on a motorcycle trip, to look back and think of where you are and who you meet, and be only a coupla-three days away from everything that you are used to and are familiar with.

Leaving our bikes parked on the main street, we go exploring around Creel.

I found this now closed business next to the Casa Margarita. They obviously tried to make a go of it catering to Estadounidenses - gringos...





I guess there wasn't a big market for cow roping lessons at the time. However, I think Creel and the Copper Canyon area is in a bull market. If I were you, I'd finish reading threads on the area, pack your moto, and head south before they reopen this place, and add hundreds more like it, along with McDonalds. Once they pave the road to Batopilas......we'll, you know what I mean.

Casa Margarita's. This is the hotel on the square, where lots of backpacker types from all over the world elect to stay. Lots of moto travelers as well.




The square, surrounded by the bank, the post office, Casa Margarita's, and the train station:





In March, when I went down to Batopilas, I had my camera out one morning and started taking pictures of our server at breakfast and Ramey Stroud, "Coach", who was there to give us off-road training.

The server, Rosario, told me she never had seen a photograph of herself before. I was kind of taken off-guard. I told her I would take her picture with Coach, and send some to her. Then she told me she had never received mail before. I was in the middle of a cultural moment, thinkng about this.

Fast forward to this trip, and I have two of the photos I want to send her with me on my motorcycle. I had her so-called address on a slip of paper I had kept since March, but it didn't make sense to me, so thats why I didn't send the photos from San Antonio.

The answer was to come to Creel, and mail them from there. If I had had more time, it would have been more my style to go back down to Batopilas and give them to her myself.

Here one of the photos that I hope by now are posted somewhere in Rosario's room in Batopilas:



And the kindly postmaster of Creel, who helped me format the pictures with a cutting board to fit into the bubble mailer he sent me to buy at the papeleria:







It may seem like a lot of work to some, to go through all of this just to send two photographs, but I told Rosario I would do it and I intended to keep my word.

I also hope the next time Coach is in Batopilas and has breakfast at that restaurant, that Rosario will go and get these photos and surprise him.

That is if you aren't reading this thread, Coach.

Now, I told YOU that the story of Canada Dave II would be next. Let me upload this so I don't lose it, and I'll get right on it...
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Old 12-16-2007, 05:21 AM   #170
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The Incredible Tale of Canada Dave II

I stick by my travel tip to Creel, to park your bike on the main street, because you never know who you are going to meet.

It was getting to be noon-ish, and some of were thinking about lunch, so we headed back more towards the internet cafe and to find a spot to grab lunch before breaking from Creel and riding over to Divisadero. Its only a short jump over there, so we were in for a relaxing lunch.

We pop into the internet cafe to check email and advrider:



And we pop out to find a restaurant to eat at.

Then I spot this guy and his 1200GS...

Meet Canada Dave II (Canada Dave I had the Harley, you remember)



Dave had been in Mexico for a month and some change. I will tell you his story in three parts.

Part I:

Dave was doing a big loop of Mexico and living la vida loca. He's in Durango, and wakes up one morning thinking he's got to find a place to gas up the GS before leaving out on his adventure. He didn't realize that in just about an hour, he would be in the hospital.

He finds out that there is a PEMEX only a block and a half from his hotel in Durango.

Dave decides NOT to wear his jacket, nor his helmet. "Hey, what can happen only a block and a half from your hotel, right?"

Part II:


He fills up the GS, and is on his way back to his hotel...

BAM!! CRUNCH!!

Dave is struck from behind by a car and sent flying.

His bike is sent flying.

Pieces of his bike go flying.

Dave, with no jacket or helmet, is hurt pretty bad. And now he's in the hospital.

Fast forward in the hospital. Dave is fighting an infection from one of the gastly cuts he suffered.

Antibiotic infusion numero uno does not work.

Antibiotic infusion numero dos does not work.

Antibiotic infusion numero tres does NOT work.

By this juncture, Dave is planning to be evacuated to the U.S. and the nearest hospital to save his own life. Things were not looking good.

Antibiotic infusion numero quatro takes hold. After too long in the hospital, Dave is out of danger and will heal to ride his motorcycle in Mexico some more.

Except his bike needs to be repaired.

And he finds himself in court.

Part III:

NOTICE: I ran the legal aspect of this story by Gustavo for factual verification, because that's the kind of international journalist that I am, and because I am still at the situation Dave found himself in.

The man who clocked Dave was a 19 year old from a poor family in or around Durango. Drunk. as. a. skunk.

The kid was arrested and put in jail.

When Dave could get out of the hospital, he finds himself, a judge, lawyers, and the kid's family in a scenio like this:

The kid is going to prison unless Dave signs a piece of paper absolving him of responsibility.

Dave asks the judge, out of curiosity, what would happen if he doesn't sign the release.

The judge tells Dave that the kid would suffer from malicious attention, if you know what I mean, and in total, would last about a month in the penetentiary.

The parents and extended family are present, and know this, and are besides themselves, begging Dave not to let that happen.

The family is offering Dave all the money they can scrape together to help pay for the damages to the bike, and begging him to sign the paper, and release their son from certain hell.

I will inject at this point, that you, dear reader, know as well as I do, that Dave is not, ever, going to let this happen to another human being, and destroy this family's life forever.

All he is interested in doing is getting out of court, getting back on his journey, and letting this kid learn his lesson and get back with his family and on with life.

The judge asks if he will accept the money the family offers.

He does.

The judge asks if he will sign the release, returning the boy to their family (yes, I know he's 19 and a man, but to the family, he's their boy).

Tap tap tap tap tap tap tap tap...

"Yes, your honor, I will sign the release"

What happens next is the family is crying and the mother is practically on the floor. Dave starts to cry. He didn't tell me, but for dramatic flare I'll assume the judge starts to cry, the lawyers start to cry, and somewhere a band starts playing.

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Old 12-18-2007, 11:28 PM   #171
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This guy can tell a story or what!

Hi Bob ... wish you where here enduring my driving in Messico !!
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Old 12-19-2007, 03:28 PM   #172
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don_Alejo

Hi Bob ... wish you where here enduring my driving in Messico !!
Yo tambien, amigo!

Next I will be telling the Creel - Divisadero - N. Casas Grandes story.

One part of this segment was made into a motivational poster:




This and the Copper Canyon moneyshot pics are next...
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Old 12-19-2007, 04:27 PM   #173
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot



WooHoo!!!! Looks like one of he RR crossings between Divisadero and Creel. Lets hear the story Bob. Was there a train coming and you had to stop?? Did you have to stop and take a leak right there?? Stop to check the map?? What's the story???

Great report Bob. I look foward to it everyday. When you are back home in the humdrum workday world, reports like this make it bearable. Are you ready to go back?? I certainly am. Should I swing by and get you? I could stand a couple weeks south of the border right now.


Kenny
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Old 12-21-2007, 05:56 PM   #174
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There's a big hole in the ground here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyanc
Should I swing by and get you? I could stand a couple weeks south of the border right now.
Kenny
Vamanos Kenny Man!

Stand by K-Man, you will recognize every picture that follows...

Anybody and everybody who makes Creel their destination in Mexico is only a short spit from Divisadero.

Take note of the map:




You can see in the map that Creel and Divisadero are along the Copper Canyon Railway line.

This part of the story covers Wednesday of the second week of the trip.

Alejo, Bruce, and the Colorado Duo were on their way direct from Parral to Diviadero, while myself, U.K. Peter, Scottish Steve, and El Tigre, the other Bob, were finishing walking the streets of Creel.

When the draw of the canyon couldn't be resisted anymore, I led the other three out of town and to the turnoff to Divisadero. I waved them past me, as nowhere on the trip has anyone stopped to take the magnitude of photos such as I have. Its too bad, as when we all get back from these trips all we have left are the stories and the memories - and you have to have photographs for that. In fact, when this ride report takes its place under the layers of dust and history on advrider, the photos posted here will be primarily for my benefit, and those of the poor souls who have to endure my narration at their houses in front of their computers. Hey, at least its not an AMWAY presentation!

Just a note before I take you out of Creel about Canada Dave II...his bike was taken from Durango to Mazatlan to be fixed, get this, by Ramon, the same guy who tried to fix Canada Dave I's Harley. Small world, or what??

Even after being repaired as best as could be, meaning safely back on the road so Dave could finish his trip, here's what the back of his bike looked like the day we met him:



And here is a pic of Dave taken somewhere in Canada after he returned safely from his trip to Mexico:



OK, let's saddle up and make the short drive to Divisadero.

I love railroads, and I read up on the history of the line that basically connects Ojinaga to Los Mochis and is commonly known as the Copper Canyon Railway. Most people connect in either Chihuahua or Creel and make the trip to Los Mochis.

What people don't commonly know is that while there are many tunnels, bridges and great things to see on the line, the only real knockout view of the canyon system is at the stop in Divisadero, where the train will typically stop for about 15 minutes so gawkers can descend the stairway and walk over to the rim of the canyon and take their "moneyshot" photos.

Its also the time to pick up some Tarahumara crafts before boarding the train. And, a snack. Its advertised that they don't allow food on the train, so people chow down on the oil drum vendor food at the station, or sneak something under their coat before getting back on.

I parked the GS on the tracks to take a photo of it and the railway....





Have I pointed out that the sky was blue and the air crisp with the scent of pine scented air? Yes I have.

OK, let me know proceed to Kenny's question on how my bike landed on its rear at the next crossing.

This is the shot I wanted to ride away with:



And here are the shots I ended up with:






No, Kenny, I did not stop for an oncoming train



I did not stop for a wiz




I'm not sure if it was a fatigue factor, excitement of nearing the canyon, subhuman motorcycle skill, or all three, but I thought I pushed the sidestand all the way down with my heel, and failed. While it had actually snapped back into the up position, I thought it was down and went to lean the bike over.

Have you been there? That microsecond of time when your bike is falling over and you realize what you did, and in seeming slow motion it rolls onto it's side and you have to do that little dance to get out of the way. OK well maybe you haven't but thats what happend to me!



I'll post up and press on, we're taking this tale onwards to Casas Grandes tonight...
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Old 12-21-2007, 06:11 PM   #175
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I did the EXACT same thing last Friday with my BMW650....broke the molded BMW side case lock right off as it slowly hit the pavement...crunch...
Thought the stand was down...


Really enjoying your report....

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Old 12-21-2007, 06:20 PM   #176
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
Have you been there? That microsecond of time when your bike is falling over and you realize what you did....
BTDT.... Luckily a KLR is not near as heavy as a fully loaded GS. I was able to catch it and get it back up before it fell that time.

My KLR has been known to take a dirt nap on occasion though.

Everybody knows that a KLR's natural position is on it's side.

Kenny
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Old 12-21-2007, 06:36 PM   #177
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Whistle Stop Divisadero

As I rolled on into Divisadero, I got to thinking about the dropped bike and how my reaction was that I just started laughing. And I was happy I didn't re-injure my hamstring, since I was all out of Supradol

Each time I've rolled into Mexico, its been with Motoport's air mesh kevlar:



This is the same stuff that Jay (Jammin Through Mexico) has.

I came upon another one of these:



But I figured I already had my train track shots.

Pulled into the parking area for the Hotel Divisadero Barrancas, and found the other three hombres already parked and enjoying the views.

Scottish Steve: "Hey, there's a big hole here!"



Yours truly:













UK Peto is a happy bloke:



El Tigre inside the Hotel Divisadero Barrancas, enjoying refreshment and the view out the window....



If you're interested in staying at this hotel, this is the view out the lobby window where El Tigre is looking:



Outside, El Chepe - as the train is known locally - is pulling into the station at Divisadero:



If you are into Tarahumara artesanias - crafts - you have hit paydirt:





The basket that this woman is finishing:



Was priced at 40 pesos, about $4

I bought it, and its now here in San Antonio in my bicycle shop.

Divisadero veterans know this shot well. Looking back down the stairs to the overlook and the hotel:



At the top of the stairs, it was time to check out the interesting food cooked on top of the drums....














I picked this. Guess what it is:





Station Divisadero:









Alas our hotel was not the Hotel Divisadero Barrancas, ours was 2 miles up the dirt road. We liked this location, and felt it was like a bird in hand. We wanted to stay here, not somewhere up the road. We did not know what a treat lay in store.

Stops along the way on the short ride to the hotel:











We roll into the hotel next and meet a surprise guest....































































































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Old 12-21-2007, 07:25 PM   #178
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San (Saint) Francisco!

Just about two miles on dirt continuing past Divisadero you cross the tracks one last time before you get to the hotel we stayed at:



The Hotel Masion Tarahumara and the El Castillo restaurant:



Waiting to greet us is Maria, the owner:



She is certainly a charmer. Little did I know this would be my favorite place on the trip.



Now flash back to the previous day and the stay at the Hotel Pueblo Viejo. I really wanted to check up on Francisco there, but he was not to be found. THATS BECAUSE HE WAS HERE!!



Yes, it turns out that the Pueblo Viejo and the Hotel Mansion Tarahumara are family owned hotels, Francisco runs Viejo and Maria - HIS SISTER - runs the H. Mansion Tarahumara!

What luck for me, I was really on a mission to see how Francisco was holding up after losing Yolanda last year in that tragic accident.

So I looked him in the eye -



And asked him. His response told the whole story...



So you guys who are headed to Creel and have the fortune of meeting this marvelous man, put your arm around him and let him know you're thinking of him. He will really appreciate it, more than you know. He loves the people who come from far and wide to visit with him and he will really, really take it to heart that you hold him in your thoughts and prayers.

The Hotel Mansion Tarahumara does not have a canyon view, but they are building a new annex on top of the mountain that will have views.

After Maria showed my the room, I knew I could get all the views I wanted by riding to the rim. I wanted to stay HERE! While the Hotel Divisadero Barrancas is nice, its kind of like a rustic Howard Johnson's bolted to the rim of the canyon. Once the sun goes down, it is what it is. Since you have access to the canyon rim all over the place, I loved staying at the H. Mansion Tarahumara because it was kind of like little cabins all to yourself, tucked into the steep, rocky hillside.

Maria gave me Room 47, which was actually 47a and 47b devided by a door, but she let me have the whole suite.





A little kitchenette, which might have come in handy had the stay been over several days. Then again, with the quality of the food served here, I don't think I would have pulled out a pan..



The room, lost in the trees:



Some people who stay here leave their bikes back at the railway station and take the hotel bus up. All of our gang made it up the dirt and the steep hotel drive, though. And El Tigre and I even further, to park our bikes on the hillside, next to our respective rooms...



Walkways though the property:





Back down to the restaurant balcony....



To acquire a celebratory botella de vino tino y unas copas to share with some buds....like principally Alejo who had just arrived from Parral with Bruce and the Missing Man Motorcycle:



Don't worry, in about 10 minutes Alejo and I were toasting the joys of being in Mexico (where Alejo is once again at this writing, on his way to Panama to pick up an Italian group and returning to Veracruz).

Meanwhile, at the restaurant...



The guitar was strummed...



The food was grand...



(Yes, this is MORE flan belonging to Alejo - the Flan Man)

And even people we didn't know were toasting our enjoyment of thier beautiful country - Mexico!:



It was soon time to be off to bed.

Back at my room, I pulled out my spanish books and studied some. When I hit the pillow, I had a dream of digging a tunnel through the mountain to the canyon wall. I knew I had only one more night in Mexico, and I was trying to put the days together, trying to remember where I was day-by-day. This was my fourth trip to Mexico in a year, and each was different, none better than the other, though at the same time, my enjoyment increasing each time and feeling more comfortable, as if the border between the our two countries had disappeared and it was as natural to ride from Texas to Mexico as it is to ride from Texas to New Mexico.

Even now, back in San Antonio, I plot and scheme ways to go back sooner than the time between trips before. In fact, over dinner tonight I asked (informed?) my wife how cool it would be to ride to Mexico in January to go to spanish immersion school.

She just smiled that smile. That's why I married her! What a woman!

Next, I'll show you a canyon sunrise....
























































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Old 12-21-2007, 07:49 PM   #179
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FemmeFatale
I did the EXACT same thing last Friday with my BMW650....broke the molded BMW side case lock right off as it slowly hit the pavement...crunch...
Thought the stand was down...


Really enjoying your report....

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyanc
BTDT.... Luckily a KLR is not near as heavy as a fully loaded GS. I was able to catch it and get it back up before it fell that time.

My KLR has been known to take a dirt nap on occasion though.

Everybody knows that a KLR's natural position is on it's side.

Kenny
Hi guys! Sure make me feel better!

Morning pics and canyon views....



Got this morning canyon sunrise by climbing up to the rim, up a steep, steep, steep road and steep, steep, steep stairs. And, in keeping with the non-litigating society Mexico is, there was absolutely no railing on the rock I was perched upon to get this photo above.

I can tell you, with legs dangling off the side of the canyon wall.....



Who lives down there?????



One more stop to check out the wares...



Cuerno de una vaca: ....sound like the city of Cuernavaca?



Morning mist burning off the canyon...



Man, the air smelled good...





I wound back along the tracks to the intersection. For a moment, I wanted to turn right, deeper south into parts unknown. I had to turn left...



To pass through Creel once again and on to Nuevo Casas Grandes, the last stop in Mexico overnight.

Alejo made sure I didn't go AWOL. I pointed north, this was his response:



Stopped and got gas at the PEMEX in Creel, and fired up and away from one of my favorite areas in all of Mexico.





It will be yours, too.
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Old 12-21-2007, 08:00 PM   #180
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That sunrise was absolutely STUNNING!!!!

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Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail...... Ralph Waldo Emerson


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