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Old 11-28-2007, 07:20 AM   #91
Uncle Pollo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldBMWMaster
I began reading this RR with a Harley buddy. As soon as you mentioned that one of the bikes broke on the trip, I said "Harley POS". He bet me $20.00 it was the BMW final drive.

(This is, I believe, the last known photograph of Canada Dave I's 1974 Harley flathead in working condition. Tomorrow, the motor would blow up underneath him on Mex 15)


Thanks for the money. I will buy top shelf tequila for the girls.
Great!
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Old 11-28-2007, 10:24 AM   #92
Jammin
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Bob, excellent ride report! I love the flowing approach to your report. Looks like you're on your way to becoming a Mexico Riding Ambassador

Waiting for the rest...
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Old 11-28-2007, 11:00 AM   #93
Gustavo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
CEDA CAMBIO DE LUCES

Another try?
I just wanted to say your report sucks.

Mainly because you barred me from participating, it's actually pretty good otherwise...


Gustavo
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Old 11-28-2007, 01:03 PM   #94
tricepilot OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammin
Bob, excellent ride report! I love the flowing approach to your report. Looks like you're on your way to becoming a Mexico Riding Ambassador

Waiting for the rest...




I bow to your ride report Jay, here's the link for everyone once again:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=268571

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustavo
I just wanted to say your report sucks.

Mainly because you barred me from participating, it's actually pretty good otherwise...


Gustavo
Ladies and Gentlemen, the Great Gustavo is in the house!




Some of the best reading anywhere on advrider!:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=130257

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=198031

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=215855
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Old 11-28-2007, 01:53 PM   #95
Gustavo
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Oh, yes, this last post reminded me of something I forgot to mention in my reply:

You are having way too much fun with Photoshop. Some really nice work , even if un poco in that last post...

Now get back to work, there is still a lot of ground to cover.





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Old 11-28-2007, 02:42 PM   #96
FatChance
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Great ride report!

I'm enjoying this a great deal. Thanks!
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Old 11-28-2007, 04:00 PM   #97
princess jamaica
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excellent story and pics.i MUST go someday.
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Old 11-28-2007, 04:07 PM   #98
tricepilot OP
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Meltdown

I was right behind him when it blew.

Cananda Dave (I) was sitting on top of a time bomb, it turned out.

We were rolling Mex 15, headed to El Fuerte. It was another, yet again, perfect day to be riding in Mexico. I was enjoying cruising along, lost in my own thoughts. I was on another day's ride when the IPOD was left in the bag, as I didn't want to hear anything but the hummmm of the motorcycle and those of other riders around me.

Suddenly, brrrrrrrrrrrrrrummmmmmmmphlegggggghhhgghhhh

I felt like I was behind one of the Thunderbirds or Blue Angels when flight lead says "SMOKE ON!"

Tiny drops of oil hit my windshield and visor, and Dave pulled over so suddenly that I couldn't stop and had to swerve (safely) around him. We were two lanes in one direction, with no shoulder whatsover.

Bruce was up ahead of me somewhere, and I knew others were behind Dave and I and would stop to help him. Alejo was not too far behind with the van and the trailer.

I caught up with Bruce and made a slashing motion across my neck and pointed back to where we came from. He knew something had gone wrong.

When he pulled over, I told him Dave's motor had blown. Alejo came screaming along, having seen Dave on the side of the road, but he too had to pass initially, catch up with us, and then turn around to go back to fetch him.

Everybody collected and we made the decision to press on to El Fuerte since Dave was in good hands with a lifeline from Alejo and the van/trailer combo.

Motorcycle #1 of 2 not to finish the trip was done with Mexico.

Dave's bike is a 1974 flathead. That's a lotta years on a bike to take to Mexico, but Dave said he had gone over the bike pretty well and felt it was going to be fine down here.

There is no good or bad bike to take to Mexico, just one that suits you best and one that has had reasonable maintenance done to it.

Pretty much the things that go wrong with bikes in Mexico are:

(1) Flats

(2) Electrical (mainly dead batteries)

(3) Everything else

If you don't have Alejo and his trailer to get you out of Mexico, then you have to use your wits.

What I would do if I was on my own and my motorcycle absolutely died, and I couldn't get parts to fix it in a timely manner, would be to get someone with a truck to take it to a town where I could leave it with someone, and bus back to San Antonio, get a truck of my own or a trailer, and go back into Mexico and retrieve it.

In any event, it would stink to have your ride give it up on any trip, but you have to have some idea of what you could do if it happened to you.

Dave ended up riding in the van with Alejo the rest of the trip, save for a day when Colorado Carl was kind enough to take a day off and let him ride his Honda.

I would take a Harley on a long road trip in a heartbeat.

In fact, I have one and I took it around Lake Superior in 2005. Note the Office Depot file crate strapped to the back with my camping gear. I remind myself of Putts:








I used to have some opinion on brands of bikes. Then I read Peter Egan's Leanings, and then Leanings II, and it changed the way I viewed all motorcycles. Now, I like all types of bikes, and I am more of the "its not what you ride but that you ride" type of person.

That said, no matter what you ride to Mexico, I would really, really make sure you have done all you can possible do to get it ready for longs days in hot weather and also for altitude. If you take care of the rubber and the battery, and have everything else checked out, then you'll probably be fine.

And have a plan on what you'd do if you broke down in the middle of nowhere.


tricepilot screwed with this post 11-28-2007 at 04:18 PM
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Old 11-28-2007, 04:23 PM   #99
kennyanc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
There is no good or bad bike to take to Mexico, just one that suits you best and one that has had reasonable maintenance done to it......

.....Now, I like all types of bikes, and I am more of the "its not what you ride but that you ride" type of person.

That said, no matter what you ride to Mexico, I would really, really make sure you have done all you can possible do to get it ready for longs days in hot weather and also for altitude. If you take care of the rubber and the battery, and have everything else checked out, then you'll probably be fine.

And have a plan on what you'd do if you broke down in the middle of nowhere.

Excellent point Bob. The best bike to take to Mexico is the one you have. Prep it right; new tires, good battery, etc. and hit the road. Very seldom do the stars align to where everything is perfect. If you sit around and wait for that you may never go. Just get off your butt and go!! It will all work out.

I have never really had a plan in case something broke. Just figured I would pay somebody with a truck to get it back to the border and then rent a u-haul or something to get it back to NC.

On the other hand, it is after all just a KLR. Not the end of the world if it never comes home.

Kenny
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Old 11-28-2007, 04:27 PM   #100
tricepilot OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance
Great ride report!

I'm enjoying this a great deal. Thanks!
FC!

Dude, what will it take to get your Honda 90 off your hands?!?!?!

I know you wouldn't/shouldn't sell it, but man, that was supposed to be my bike back in the day!


Quote:
Originally Posted by princess jamaica
excellent story and pics.i MUST go someday.
PJ!

Don't wait too long to get to Mexico! I'd even ride your Ducati if I were you, if you haven't sold it yet!

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Old 11-28-2007, 04:37 PM   #101
kennyanc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
Don't wait too long to get to Mexico! I'd even ride your Ducati if I were you, if you haven't sold it yet!
Ride, Princess, Ride!!! Just go!!
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Old 11-28-2007, 04:40 PM   #102
tricepilot OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kennyanc
I have never really had a plan in case something broke. Just figured I would pay somebody with a truck to get it back to the border and then rent a u-haul or something to get it back to NC.
Kenny
Nah, I have a better plan.

You would sit tight in whatever town you were in, and PM me, and I would come and fetch you and the KLR while you waited with a supply of cervazas and limes.



I have an emergency stash of pesos on the bike for "contingency" logistics such as exactly you describe.

People reading this thread and starting to think about what they would do should remember that the people of Mexico are incredibly helpful and creative. That, and any reasonable sum of money you offer to get help would probably be a godsend to them while at the same time getting yourself out of a jam.

But hey, its adventure travel.

"The adventure starts when things stop going according to plan"

- Glen Heggstad
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Old 11-28-2007, 04:46 PM   #103
kennyanc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
Nah, I have a better plan.

You would sit tight in whatever town you were in, and PM me, and I would come and fetch you and the KLR while you waited with a supply of cervazas and limes.


Woohoo!! Sounds like a plan to me.
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Old 11-28-2007, 05:51 PM   #104
SKINNY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot





What I would do if I was on my own and my motorcycle absolutely died, and I couldn't get parts to fix it in a timely manner, would be to get someone with a truck to take it to a town where I could leave it with someone, and bus back to San Antonio, get a truck of my own or a trailer, and go back into Mexico and retrieve it.

In any event, it would stink to have your ride give it up on any trip, but you have to have some idea of what you could do if it happened to you.



That was pretty much my plan, last January when the ignition module on my new Husky decided to take a dump in downtown Batopilas on a Saturday afternoon...I found a local on Sunday who took me and my wounded partner Teeds, back to Creel, where we hired another local to take us to Presidio...I'm still bummed about that...
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Old 11-28-2007, 06:39 PM   #105
hgulledge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
Kenny,

You were correct on POBLADO PROXIMO, but missed on this one. This one is important for safety reasons. It has nothing to do with night time driving with high beams!

Hint #1: Look up the spanish verb ceder

Hint #2: Its high noon, and you're on a highway following a truck, for example, and you pull out to pass. As you get into the left lane, there is a truck coming in the other direction, himself being passed by a car who is flashing his headlights. What is the car communicating by flashing his lights? Therein lies the meaning of the sign,,,,,,

CEDA CAMBIO DE LUCES

Another try?
The first one to flash his lights expects to have the right-of-way. Especially important to know when meeting oncoming vehicles on really narrow bridges. DAMHIK
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