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Old 12-04-2010, 05:11 AM   #721
Nordkapp55
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Hi Tage! Really great and awesome reports!
You and CapaFamiglia great Biker-Gourmet! I like your attention to people, history....Wonderful work! Please go on!
Ps: I've changed my bike... I left my loved Caponord... Newbie is Super Ténéré 1200 ;0)
Francesco
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Old 12-05-2010, 03:53 AM   #722
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Thumb Riding in Greece: From Chalkida to Nafplio

It is Monday 22. March 2010. It is the 11th day of our vacation in
Greece. We are in Chalkida on Evia (an island).

(As I write I listen to Brahms Piano Concerto #2. How appealing it is
to start an Andante movement in a Piano Concerto with a long and
stunningly beautiful cello solo; sorry, but I am easily carried away
by beautiful things.)



If you spend the night doing other things than sleeping, then there is
a price to pay. I've heard that there is no such thing as a free
lunch, but it feels as if other things aren't for free, either. Don't
get me wrong: It is worth it, beyond doubt. But still - it is 10:30
before all the luggage has been hauled down from the room and
installed on the bike.

The plan for the day is to reach Peloponnese. That's all. Not that we
need to, but that is our plan. For whatever it might be worth.



As I fail to make an interesting photo of flowers I reflect a little
on The Old Greek and the
Peloponnesian
war
. I am sure it was important for the Old Greeks. But why
have I heard so much about it? Wikipedia says: The Peloponnesian War
continues to fascinate later generations, because of the way it
engulfed the Greek world. The insight Thucydides provides into the
motivations of its participants is deeper than that which is known
about any other war in ancient times.
. OK, but so what? Why have
I heard about this war and, say, not the one where Philip II of
Macedona (isn't that a country bordering Greece?) conquered
the whole thing? Nice for the Greeks, but why do I know more about
the political effects of Sparta's victory over Athens, than the
political aftermath of the
Battle
at Stamford Bridge
. Maybe the Greeks are better at marketing
their wars than the (descendants) of the Vikings are.

Maybe it is because I have been starved for "local" history in my
youth that I now lust so much for old things? Maybe I should not
dwell too much on why I lust for things. For sanity's sake.



Yesterday morning, in Xania, we had winter. With snow and running ski
lifts. Today we have summer. It is nice. Capa smiles. Which is
even nicer. We pass what I assume is wines (the things grapes grow
on) that have been cut way down. Or am I wrong?



Vacation isn't just about having time off. For us, at least, it is
about "doing something different". When we lived well above the Artic
Circle (which, in case you don't know, is far, far north!) "something
else" always included a nice beach and warm water. "How far north?" you
ask. Well, if you know where Prudhoe Bay is, I used to live that far
north. At 70°N.

In any case, whenever I see a beach, a proper white, sandy, delicious
beach, I am happy I don't feel the need to sit on it any more. I used
to lust for it (more lust!), but now that I live in Toscana I am
"full". I have enough sun during the year to keep me going that odd
day or two when it isn't shining. That's why we're in Greece in March
and not in July.

We have a rest - over looking a very nice beach.



We decend to find a very long, and completely deserted beach. How
nice! Being in Greece and having a two kilometer long beach all to
out selves. That doesn't happen too often, I guess.

We are only about one hour from Athens. In summer I take it they are
all here, the Athenians (or whatever they are called in English).



As the beach is deserted, no lunch on the beach today, we stop in the
tiny village Kato Alepochori. She visit a "mini marked" and then we
park in the small harbor they have.

While we eat we discuss food, and agree that we too frequently yield to
temptation and eat meat. Nothing wrong with meat, but we both feel
more well and "lighter" when we are modest. We will try harder, we
say.



With a white fishing vessel looking at us from a few meters, who would
object? The colors are beautiful. No less. After "coffee" at a bar,
we ride on.

When you spend a full day on the bike you get very attentive to it's
well being. For all practical purposes, the left indicator is dead.
You can live without the right one, but the left is too dangerous;
we're in Greece, after all. I have brought lots of tools so taking
the left handlebar apart isn't the problem. But the switches can't be
opened and I can only hope that a liberal amount of WD-40 wil get them
back in action.



I salute everyone. I even salute riders with stupid handle bars,
riding without a helmet and without gloves. Even though we are a
world apart in our approach to riding I like that we both ride. He on
his toy and I on my long distance tourer. I assume he told his
friends about the ridiculously looking yellow-vest figure he had met.

Then, it is becoming obvious (even to me) that the rear tire must be
replaced Very Soon Now. It will not last another two or three
thousand kilometers (get us home, that is) so I'll better start
looking immediately. But where to find a 150/70 R15 tire? We need to
go to a larger city, me thinks.

We have "coffee" and look at the map. Next big city seems to be
Nafplio. Some good old navigation will bring us there.



Without warning, suddenly we pass the
CorinthCanal. The First Officer
believes a nice photo could be taken here, with the GS proudly on teh
bridge, but the Captain orders full speed to be maintained. So no
photo of the Canal on this trip. Sorry about that!

We do, however, take a photo of a representative from the Greek
agriculture industry. We feel somewhat like astronauts in our gear,
with the telephone attached by means of Bluetooth, on our fuel
injected engine running on idle, fully equipped with ABS, as Capa
Supriore uses her auto focus digital camera to snap this photo. Even
though I don't know anything about economy, the sight of the shepherd
seems to me as an important economic indicator. Facing crisis, how
can you run your business more efficient when you yourself are the
main cost in your business?

We cruise alone, enjoying the scenery, the roads, the countryside. We
pass Epidavros. There is a famous theater here. Very famous. But
why should we stop? This is a constant dilemma: The world is full of
things to see, but just now we're comfortably seated on our BMW, we're
riding in nice spring weather, the conversation is nice, why stop? So
we don't. We agree we must compensate this lack of cultural awareness
in some way later.



We don't stop to admire this nice bridge either. For the record: If
the First Officer was here alone, if he was captain, a photo would
have been taken with the GS on top of that bridge. The bridge isn't
as elegant as the Roman ones, but, then again, that bridge was more
than 1.000 years old when the Romans started to build impressive
bridges. This one is Mycaene, and for most things built 1000 years is
a very long time indeed! We're riding on a road that was here also
3.200 years ago. A road that also 3.200 years ago was important
enough for a bridge to be built. I like that.

[IMG]http://sitoscana.com/girotoscana/uploaded_images/2010/08/P3228088_kjott_papir.jpg[/IMG

It is dark when we arrive in Nafplio. We ride into the old town and
find Hotel Arcopol. Parking on the side walk, as always. 45 euro per
night inclusive wireless. We're late so we follow the advice offered
by the receptionist and head for a trattoria just down the street.
Not a very good advice. Not bad, but not very good.

We started with Greek Salad (as always!). Then some meat from the
grill with boiled vegetables (boiling vegetables should be Last
Resort For Desperadoes, I think). Finally wrapped in paper and boiled
in broth, with fries. Very tasty. But we're back to eating meat
again.

How can I say "Good food, but I didn't like it?" without sounding as a
complete moron? The food was good, tasty, with the correct texture
(the boiled vegetables aside), but I don't like eating such much meat.
We didn't understand the menu and explained we were hungry, and the
served us. Who am I to complain? And about what? We're in a port
city and they probably have fish - if had asked for it. We should
have been more prepared.

It is gloomy to consider that the cook has worked hard for us, and
we're not happy because we wanted something else. The perils of
serving food. You can fail because of the customer. Completely
disconnected from how you actually performed. Not fair!



I ask for a grappa, but I don't think what I find in the glass is
grappa. OK, it is strong, but it isn't grappa (as I know grappa).
The trattoria has on the card something that looks very much like
Osebergskipetin
Norway. We feel at home (probably completely unwarranted, but still)



We rode 257 km today.

Thank you for your attention!

[TaSK]
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Old 12-05-2010, 03:57 AM   #723
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Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by zakou View Post
Thank you for the report! too bad I didnt see this one earlier !!! maybe we could meet I live near Volos !!!
Its very intersting to how you see things!!! :)
We must meet in Tuscany instead!

Thank you for reading!

[TaSK]
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Old 12-05-2010, 04:01 AM   #724
tagesk OP
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Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nordkapp55 View Post
Ps: I've changed my bike... I left my loved Caponord... Newbie is Super Ténéré 1200 ;0)
Francesco
How lucky we are: Living in Tuscany!

I hope we can write a nice report together from Riding in Tuscany. Including a fantastic lunch!
AT the moment my GS is very dead. But I am working on it; hope to be back on the road shortly.

In any case - thank you for reading!

[TaSK]
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:29 AM   #725
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No wonder you've been too busy to write!
Nasty stuff there.
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Old 12-05-2010, 08:52 AM   #726
tagesk OP
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Thumb

Quote:
Originally Posted by wanna_be View Post
what did you end up doing with Zumo?what about the life long maps you've bought?
When I got home and had time to study it carefully, it became evident that the Zumo had received a hard
impact on the screen. I don't know how it could have happened. Maybe it is been in my pocket and the jacket
has hit something. Or I have sat down on the jacket and crushed the GPS. Or something.
In good light, with glasses on, I could see the screen was cracked on several places.

I contacted Garmin and they said I most likely would have to buy a new one; they said that in general they don't repair them,
they replace them. But if it is replaced you get a 25% discount on a new one. As part of that, they will also
transfer the "Lifetime maps" to the new device.

Fortunately they repaired mine. It cost me about 150 euro to get it fixed (as opposed to about 400 with a 25% discount).
The fix was to replace the broken screen. Good as new now.

Capa Superiore says "Hello"!

[TaSK]
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Old 12-09-2010, 08:32 AM   #727
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Tage, great report, keep up the good work..... please!

I'm planning to ship a bike to Germany next year and spend several weeks in June/July exploring the Alps, Corsica, and Italy. Can you tell me about the weather conditions in central Italy that time of the year.

The MotoGP is scheduled for June 3 at Mugelllo, I'm thinking it might be fun to be in Tuscany then.

Regards, Paul
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Old 12-09-2010, 08:43 AM   #728
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadscum View Post
Tage, great report, keep up the good work..... please!

I'm planning to ship a bike to Germany next year and spend several weeks in June/July exploring the Alps, Corsica, and Italy. Can you tell me about the weather conditions in central Italy that time of the year.

The MotoGP is scheduled for June 3 at Mugelllo, I'm thinking it might be fun to be in Tuscany then.

Regards, Paul
Should be nice an hot in central Italy. I was in Milan in July and was sweating through my poorly ventilating textiles in 100 degree F weather. June maybe a little cooler. I think the best gear for your trip would be textiles that are waterproof and ventilate well. The alps are amazing...i have yet to write up my trip report but it was just amazing...
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Old 12-26-2010, 01:20 AM   #729
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A bit late.... happy Holidays, Tagesk!
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:00 AM   #730
tagesk OP
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Thumb Riding in Greece: Around Nafplio

(just a reminder: The text associated with a picture is always below
the picture, never above)



It is Tuesday 23. March 2010, the 12th day of our Riding in
Greece-holiday. We are in Nafplio. We need to take a day off riding
to get the technical issues of the bike under control. A day off,
that means donning a tailor made shirt, and sit by the water and write
a letter.

Why don't anyone write letters any longer? Well, some do, but few.
If your reply is "Because we have email", I don't buy it. Writing
with a pen incurs two disadvantages: It is physical work and it needs
planning. As there is no (nice) way to change what you have already
written, you must plan your sentences. If you start with "it" you can't
talk about your wife.
Furthermore, you must plan what you want to say. With no (nice) cut
and paste, a paragraph needs to remain where it was placed. How many
times have I not read text written by students where it is obvious
that paragraphs have been moved around. And long sentences that start
out in one direction, then after a while, turn, and end up somewhere
else. The effect of "writing enables me to think better". The problem
is that making drafts, outlines, and "taking points" has become a lost
art. The ease with which spell checker "improve" you text hides the
fact that more and more of the text you read is not well written.

And, we all write in the largest language on Earth: English spoken by
foreigners. How often have I not repeated: If you want to learn
English, steer away from Internet. But the Time Literary Supplement
or read The Correction Ah, I remember Prof. Needham from Cambridge;
in general he would not use a word more than once in every lecture. He had so
many. And he knew how to use them. By the way: On the way up the
stairs in Computer Laboratory in Cambridge I was always amused by the
sign "Heating is not a substitute for adequate clothing".

Anyway, I believe these two disadvantages of writing is the core fo
the issue. It is not that because email aren't hampered by the two
disadvantages, letters are instead written as emails. At least not to
me. I've just now gone through all the 1.075 private emails I have
received in 2010. Two of them are what I would call a letter (as
opposed to a short note). Maybe it is only me. I envy you if you
receive long emails. Emails where you feel that time and energy has
gone into the writing. Not only because it is long, but because
effort has gone into the selection of words, how to introduce
ambivalence where appropriate, and so on.

So it isn't, I believe, that email is easier. It is that something
that was important has become to be viewed as a labour we are now
freed from. Note: I savour the two long and well-written email have I
received this year. So my ranting has nothing to do with email, as
such.

Oh well - at the end of the day it is probably true that "Tell me who
you friends are, and I'll tell you who you are". Well: In general my
friends don't write me letters (neither on paper or in emails). Make
from it whatever you can.



Having written the letter, and enjoyed a coffee, we're feel ready to meet
the day and whatever it might bring us. In a few minutes it will be
demonstrated that we are not at all ready to meet reality. But
ignorance is bliss.

I need to spend the day hunting for WD-40. Then take the assembly on
the left handle bar apart and (try to) fix the indicator. Then ride
around in Nafplio and search for a new rear tire.

While riding we're 520 kg (1150 pounds). That is way over what it is
supposed to be. That is OK, but I'm running 3.3 bar (47 psi) in the
tire. It is, by far, not enough. But it is more than MAX PRESSURE
neatly printed on the side wall of the tire. If we were lumping
around in 40 km/h I would have pumped in more air. But the way we
ride, I don't dare to. So we're eating away on the tire. Now it
needs to be replaced.

We don't carry more than we need. So how anyone (of our size) car
travel on a 1150GS without exceeding the weight limit is more than I
understand.

But then reality arrives.



A little Gypsy (Romani) girl comes along. She begs for money.

Rule number one: Never, ever, give money to children. If no-one did,
the parents would hopefully give it up, and send them to school
instead. Maybe the parents would realize that it is more profitable
to let them go to school than to beg. More future in education than i
begging. She is very, very insistent, but we hold firm. She is maybe
four years old.

Why she was so insistent becomes evident a few minutes later. She
meets her mother, who gives the little girl a good beating for not
having collected money. In the middle of the street, the mother hits
the little child over and over again. Maybe four years old.

Two days ago, it was a Greek nationalist, at the Lion of Amphipolis
who ruined the day for us. Today it is a mother. A mother who in
public beats the shit out of a four year old girl because she hasn't
managed to "beg in" enough money.

We're sitting below the immensely impressing Venetian fortress that
towers over Nafplios. The weather is nice. We have had coffee, and
the sun is shining. This could be a nice day. But it will be an ugly
day. Not because we have witnessed something ugly. But because the
ugliness has been chosen.

The fortress is mighty, and the connotations are war. Killing and
destruction. That is what fortresses are associated with. But at
least, you build fortresses so strong that you don't need to use them.
Your efforts are, even though we are talking about destructive
forces, your efforts are meant to protect. To give hope.



Beating a tiny four year old child? What goes in the brain of a
mother to do such a thing? We work hard, we try to maintain our
dignity faced with Life's challenges. We try. Sometimes we succeed
and sometimes we fail. That is Life. But starting the day by beating
a defenseless four year old? Your own child? In particular if you are
Romani, you have had more than your fair share of ugliness. How,
then, can you maintain it? We humans try our best to do what we
believe is right. To make the world a better place to be. How does
beating a four year old fit in?

We sit at our table for a while. I keep my eyes on the sea. The day
is utterly destroyed. What can a grandfather say to a grandmother in
this situation?



Nafplio has a very nice old city. It is a little too nice. A little
too well kept. Feels artificial in a way. Greek things, like Italia,
aren't that well kept. Only museums looks like this. Maybe this is a
museum? Like San Gimignano in Tuscany. We're outside season so we
can't tell. But it is very clean and "in order".



After having walked aimlessly around for a while, and taken another
coffee, we finally "man up" and talk about it. There is so much to
say, and so little to say. We could have walked up to the fortress
and tried to see all the way to Venezia (impossible). We could have
looked at the splendid view and been happy. Are we humans really so
ugly inside? That a mother can beat her four years little child like
this? Didn't the Renaissance teach us the value of the person? The
value of each and every one?

Maybe Capa and I have been so fortunate in our lives that beating a
child simply isn't part of Universe. Is it only us?

A sad day, indeed.



But life must go on. I muster a smile as I show my WD-40. it is very
possible that they had it in one of the many other shops we visited.
But I have no idea of how WD-40 is pronounced in Greek. And trying to
explain by gestures isn't simple. But, finally, here we are.

I take the left handle bar assembly apart. Spry on a liberal amount of
WD-40, and enjoy seeing the left indicator coming back to life. Maybe
repairing the left indicator of a 1150GS on a side walk in Nafplio
isn't a big thing. But every time I repair something even moderately
complex I feel happy. Happy that I manage to "see" how it works, so
that I can repair it. Yes, I very much enjoyed Zen and the Art....



Then on to tire. After having tried all shops in Nafplio I ride over
to Argos. After having tried several places I find a combined petrol
station and scooter shop. But they have a Mexzler Tourance EXP for
me. A few phone calls, and he tells me that the standard Tourance
(non EXP) isn't imported to Greece. So EXP it will be.



I go for a "coffee" while I wait. About an hour later, and 168 euro
lighter, I am ready for more vacation. I ask them to put in 3.2 bar
but they refuse; the tire says max 3.1 bar. I explain, but they still
refuse. But, they say, you yourself are free to fill as much air as
you want. Here, take the pump and do what you want. Fair enough!
Thank you, Mr. Dealer, for taking Bamsefar in without delay and
replacing my tire!



I can't have Capa Superiore climb on board with a brand new tire, so
some riding is needed. Actually, I know know anything about how
"slippery" a new tire is. But all shops say that I need to take it
very, very carefully in the beginning. What is "very carefully"?

In any case - I'll ride around for a while. Yesterday I planned for
it, so I know where to ride; I like hotels with Internet. I am going
to visit Mycenae. On my way I pass
Tiryns. "Immense" is
the word that comes to mind. In case you're into old things: These
sites were magnets for tourists also in Roman times! We're talking
about a kingdom that collapsed (for some reason) at about 1.200 BC.

The signs are not easy to follow, and it takes a few tries to get
there, but finally I arrive on the parking lot. I can see the huge
(HUGE) walls a few hundred meters away. I'm up for a cultural shock
for which I am not prepared.

So, I've arrived at a World
Heritage Site
(the Mycenae site is described
here). One of a mere
704 sites in the whole world picked by UNESCO to represent our common
cultural heritage.

It is closed.

In a country with tourism as the main source of income, probably as
the only viable industry, here they close the site at 15:00. And, to
testify to the fact that I am not the first to be surprised, a police
car has arrived to make sure that the crowd of (very!) annoyed
tourists are held at bay. I meet quite a few cars with foreign
license plates on their way up to meet the police car, as I wind my
way down.

Here, my Greek friends, is an advice: At a time where you find
yourself at the brink of economic collapse, I advice you to treat your
guests better.



There are only one thing to do in this grim situation: Grab a (very)
Dry Martini (shaken, not stirred) and write a letter to a friend. The
girl that tents the bar here in Nafplio is not as young and good
looking as the one who greeted me in Kavala, and she looks completely
lost when I point out that would like my Dry Martini's shaken, not
stirred. Is it time for a lecture about
shaken, not
stirred
. I don't think so. I long for Bibliotheke bar in
Kavala.

I think about the small repair I did today, and the pleasure I it
offers. The pleasure of repairing a thing that is broken. But also
the feedback from Capa when she sees that I both can do it, and
actually do it. Being a professor in computer science, my working life
was filled with technology. Some of which I could repair, and some
which I could not. I know how to use ed(1) to repair Unix systems
when the functionality of the running system is so low that not even
vi(1) will run. That is, in contemporary terms, the state after the
DELL logo has disappeared but well before the Windows logo appears
(or, if you're into Apple: A few moments before the mysterious
spinning circle appear). I know what Manchester encoding is, and why
the yellow cable can not be more than 1500 meters long. But who
cares? Today, in the era of "Webtone" (coined by Larrison from
Oracle?) people "log onto the Internet" rather than initiating the
three-way handshake of TCP. Today, when my Microsoft SBS 2003 refuses
to allow a VPN connection, I have no clue what to do. Except run the
Wizard again. Today, when my emacs has 11 process in front of it on
the "Memory Usage" list, and that is without Photoshop or Picasa
running. I'm getting old, and I realize. The only thing I can still
do is to maintain my old motorcycle. U is still RI and I understand
why Phillips are being replaced by Torx. I dismiss all the things I
don't understand as modern reiterations of Good Old Stuff, look out
over the harbour, and enjoy my Dry Martini. After all, isn't Twitter
just a modern incarnation of rwall(1)? And isn't MySQL just hash(3)
with some bells and whistles? I pat myself on the back to
congratulate myself of my mastery of all things technical.

The letter was not sent. It was an effort to heal a deep rift caused
by what seemed to be greed. But after dwelling on the events for
another Dry Martini, I realize I am not ready to pass the abyss quite
yet. So if you are in possession of millions of kroner that to a large
extent were mine, know that I am contemplating closing that chapter.



One thing we do not master, is Greek. We find a place that looks like
a trattoria, and where octopus is being dried on a string outside.
We assume it is a trattoria where we can get seafood.

[IM]http://sitoscana.com/girotoscana/uploaded_images/2010/08/IMG_0663_meny_gresk.jpg[/IMG]

The menu is not at all simple to understand. Instead we try to tell
the waiter that we would like to have some sea food.



He starts by serving us some antipasti. And, I am sorry to say, the
thinnest wine we have ever seen. Again: Is Greek wine this thin, or
are they thinning it for us? After all, if you serve stupid tourists
and you want to rip them off, why thin the wine? Why not just charge
the double?
The alternatives seems to be: They pour water in the wine (BAD) or the
wine is this thin (BAD). Doesn't seem like a win-win situation to me.



We didn't get "a little" seafood, we got "a lot" of seafood. The
problem is, this doesn't at all have the quality we have had earlier.
The stuff it was rolled in before frying (I have no idea what it is
called) was too thick and the result becomes too greasy. In Volos the
fired fish was outstanding. Not, alas, not in Nafplio. Maybe there
are too many tourists here. Or too few?



They are arranging a marked along the street. Stalls are being
erected (may one use that word in this context?) and goods are laid
out. A night marked? We saw the same in a village in Thailand; it is
so hot during the day that you use the cool night to do you shopping.
Faced with air-conditioned malls a night marked might go away. But we
don't know of this marked in the new part of Nafplios is a regular
affair, or if there is a special occasion today.

The waiter passes the time.



Next to the trattoria is a tiny shop that sells newspapers and
magazines. The owner comes to our table. He tells us that after
having worked for 20 years, at an advanced age of 49, he could retire
with a full pension. He now runs this little stall both for the
entertaining value of meeting people, and to add to his meager
pension. I come from the richest country in the world, I am almost 49
years old, but I will have to wait a full 20 more years for my
pension. Maybe there is a relationship between these two?

We are a little worried about the bill. When you don't know what you
order, and get a large serving, you are prime target for a rip-off.
But no such thing arrives. We're charged 33 euro. That's OK for a
full dinner (to say the least).



109 km today.

If you want to say "It is impossible to read the names", then know
that Garmin makes very nice GPSs but their software is so poor one can
cry. If you work at Garmin, here is a message for you boss: Take a
look at Google Maps and do something about MapSpurce. The
presentation of the maps is awful, awful, awful!

Oh well - tomorrow we'll continue our exploration of Peloponnese, we'll
meet a crying waiter, and later have a very nice dinner.

Thank you for reading, and best wishes for the new year!

[TaSK]
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tagesk screwed with this post 12-26-2010 at 03:07 AM
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:08 AM   #731
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Originally Posted by Nordkapp55 View Post
A bit late.... happy Holidays, Tagesk!
Same to you!
Please come up and visit us some day with your new bike!

[TaSK]
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:12 AM   #732
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Originally Posted by Roadscum View Post
I'm planning to ship a bike to Germany next year and spend several weeks in June/July exploring the Alps, Corsica, and Italy. Can you tell me about the weather conditions in central Italy that time of the year.

The MotoGP is scheduled for June 3 at Mugelllo, I'm thinking it might be fun to be in Tuscany then.

Regards, Paul
One of the main reasons I live here, is that if you find anything but sun and blue sky
in the June/July time-frame, you should be very surprised.

My report from Mugello is here.

Don't forget to stop by for lunch in my garden!

[TaSK]
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:19 AM   #733
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Originally Posted by musicman View Post
Enjoying your trip vicariously, as usual. Abbie and I will be back in Italy in May riding Milano to Marches to Abruzzo to Roma in a week with a group, then staying another two weeks somewhere south of Roma. I don't know how we will fit a visit to Pisa into all of this but will try, especially if it's fish Friday...
If you venture south of Roma, I highly recommend Ceccano. Check out this dinner, and this one.

In addition, you are, always, welcome for lunch or dinner here!

Best wishes for the new year!

[TaSK]
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:26 AM   #734
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Originally Posted by Pelaez View Post
I will be moving to Livorno.....[...]
Did you move, did you get yourself a new bike, and will you come for lunch?



[TaSK]
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:34 AM   #735
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Greek coffee does not sound so nice to me.... however, here in the States coffee is universally bad (I think) so who am I to judge?

I have used this quote before, but it is so nice that I offer it to you again:
Quote:
Consider a mug of American coffee. It is found everywhere. It can be made by anyone.
It is cheap—and refills are free. Being largely without flavor it can be diluted to taste.
What it lacks in allure it makes up in size. It is the most democratic method ever devised
for introducing caffeine into human beings.

Now take a cup of Italian espresso. It requires expensive equipment. Price-to-volume
ratio is outrageous, suggesting indifference to the consumer and ignorance of the market.
The aesthetic satisfaction accessory to the beverage far outweighs its metabolic impact.
It is not a drink; it is an artifact.

This contrast can stand for the differences between America and Europe—differences
nowadays asserted with increased frequency and not a little acrimony on both sides
of the Atlantic
Original from the New Your Review of Books here.

Oh well - after this rush of posts I'll actually take my bike for a ride!

Thank you for reading!

[TaSK]
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