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Old 12-06-2014, 10:22 PM   #1
El Ponkin OP
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KTM 690 Troubleshooting Guide

Introduction

My attempt here is to produce a useable troubleshooting guide to help people through the eccentricities of the 690.
I will placemat the first 15 posts in this thread so that I can put sections up as I finish them and keep all the facts on the first page of the thread. I have read numerous forums and threads to gather this info and my attempt here is to collate the information into one place in a logical sequence to save you the effort of searching, like I had too. I am not claiming to be an expert I am just acting as a conduit to gather the knowledge of multiple forums and posts into one place.

Some information will be incomplete and some may be incorrect, the idea is I post it up and people can PM me corrections or additional information so it builds into a concise and accurate guide.

If you have questions you can post them up, but make sure the answer is NOT already covered in the guide first and then the collective can come up with the answer and I can add it to the guide.

Disclaimer

Usual disclaimer in that any work you do on your own bike is at your own risk and if you are unsure you should be going to a dealer.
If your bike is in warranty anything you do here will void your warranty.
This guide is to help those who are mechanically efficient and computer literate who just want the facts in one place, the guide will not make you an engineer overnight. Don’t mess with your bike unless you are completely confident you know what you are doing and have fully researched the subject.

General.

Understand that these bikes are electronically fuel injected and this requires a different set of troubleshooting rules to what you may be used to on a carbureted bike.

The basics are the same,you still need four things to make this thing go, all in the right order and quantities.

· Fuel
· Air
· Ignition
· Compression



Modern motorcycles are fairly reliable and they generally do not break without a reason.
Most issues are caused by the person/s who works on the bike, “self-induced”.
If you have a breakdown, retrace your steps and ask what was done to the bike recently that has caused this.

The 690 has issues with fuel quality and operation of the fuel pump because of the EFI sensitivity.
The rear filler design and the minute fuel injector nozzle mean that crap can get in and stop the bike.
In normal use the pump attracts a grey residue from the fuel tank material that will eventually block filters. Also the plumbing of the pump can get kinked lines and electrical connectors can work loose. Preventative measures will help you eradicate all pump and injector issues and make diagnosis much easier (Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on preventative measures) Click Here.

EFI systems are electrically controlled and driven, fault monitoring circuits therefore can only detect electrical faults and monitor for extremes i.e. open circuit or short circuit. If a sensor is misreading it will not be detected as a fault until its parameters go outside of set limits. If any sensors go outside limits you will get a flashing FI light and the KTM operators manual will be able to interpret the “blink” code which is kind of like “morse” code from the FI light blinking so many long and short blinks.

If you have a mechanical fault, a sensor reading incorrectly or an incorrectly adjusted sensor there will be no warning. If you have a combination of a couple of faults it can get very hard to diagnose, particularly if you are dealership mechanic on a tight timeframe servicing a multitude of weaponry you simply won’t have the time to get fully up to speed on one particular model. My thoughts are that you as the owner need to become an expert.

As KTM use a specific KTM diagnostics box to read and adjust the ECUs the price is inhibitive for the general home mechanic however some bright spark came up with a program called TuneECU, this is a worthwhile investment to assist troubleshooting..
(Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on set up and use of TuneECU) Click here.


PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE:

The more you do to eliminate potential sources of failure before you go riding then the easier it is to diagnose faults when it does break.
Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on Preventative Maintenance to Bulletproof your 2008-2013 KTM 690.
Click Here.

WARNING:

DO NOT spray EFI related plugs with water dispersant (WD40) as it can vary the minute voltages used in EFI systems, just use isopropyl alcohol sprays and air dry.
DO NOT use a pressure washer to clean your bike EVER, EVER.




El Ponkin screwed with this post 12-07-2014 at 03:12 AM
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Old 12-06-2014, 10:23 PM   #2
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Index of Faults

For each fault below refer to the referenced fault tables A – L

1. The FI light came on – B, H, K
2. The engine wont idle and runs erratically – A, H, I, J, K, L, C
3. The engine starts but then shuts down on its own without an FI light – A, E, H, I, J, K, L, C
4. The engine will not start at all – D, E, H, I, J, K, L
5. The engine takes a few presses before it starts - F
6. Noise from the engine – G
7. Clutch does not operate - M


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Old 12-06-2014, 10:23 PM   #3
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Fault Table A – EFI Basics

Carry out the following basic EFI test/resets as they will fix a lot of minor issues:

· Throttle calibration - This re-calibrates the start & stop position of the throttle grip. Turn the ignition on but don't start. Wait for the tacho needle to return to zero. Then turn the throttle grip gradually from close to open and back from open to closed. Don't let it snap shut. Turn the ignition off, done.
· Idle reset procedure – The 'famous' 15 minute idle reset procedure. This is only possible if the engine will sustain idle long enough to do this reset, if it won’t then continue with the other fault tables and come back to this once you have got the engine idling. This procedure resets the adaptive base values of the ECU. It won't transform the bike but it can make a worthwhile improvement. It is very important that the engine is stone cold. One or two hours after riding is not enough! Do this after the bike has been off for a full night or day. Start the engine and let it idle for 15 minutes without touching anything. After 15 minutes, switch the engine off with the ignition key. Done. During this procedure you won't see or hear anything happening besides the idling and (probably) the fan. Don't worry, the reset is done. Besides after certain maintenance or parts replacement, you could consider doing it twice a year with the turning of the seasons. A reset for the colder autumn & winter period and one time for warmer conditions during spring & summer. This is not mandatory or needed and don't expect miracles. If the engine will not idle you can use the program TuneECU to reset adaptations.





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Old 12-06-2014, 10:24 PM   #4
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Fault Table B - EFI – FI Light Flashes

If any sensors go outside limits you will get a flashing FI light. The light will be on constant at anything above idle so you need to throttle back to idle to get the light to flash the code. The KTM Owner’s manual has the fault code tables to interpret the “blink” code which is kind of like “morse” code from the FI light blinking so many long and short blinks.
NOTE: See below for more info on individual sensors.

· Check the fault codes in the owner’s manual to identify the sensor or circuit at fault
· Check the relevant sensor connection
· Check relevant sensor resistance values
· Check wiring to the sensor all the way back to the ECU and its earth connection
· Check fault codes with Dealer KTM Diagnostics Tool or use TuneECU program and laptop.

HINTS AND TIPS:
Sensors and especially the throttle body are reasonably robust so always doubt the wiring first, as a dirt bike you are more likely to have chafed a wire or a connection rattled lose.
Dealers will most likely change components first as it is quicker but can quite often lead to long waits as a throttle body is put on “back order”.
KTM Dealers have a “Breakout Box” to check looms for damage and integrity encourage them to borrow one as only certain dealers have them.


Sensor Information.

The ECU Monitors the following for faults so these maybe indicated by the fault codes.

· System Voltage – EFI systems are sensitive to volts and need a minimum voltage to work. If the volts aint right the whole system will be doing strange things. Check Fault Table H first.
· Crankshaft Position Sensor – Determines engine speed and Top Dead Centre position. Located in engine LH Side cover, cable comes out just above clutch servo, just a pulse coil sensing rotor.
· Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor – changes fuel schedule during cold starting. Just below spark plug.
· Sidestand switch – Can be removed and resistor put in its place, down by sidestand pivot point. Stops the engine starting with stand down.
· Ignition Coil – EFI monitors coil resistance to detect faults.
· Intake Air Temperature Sensor – Located inside the airbox and can be damaged by oil contamination. Connector wires are quite often damaged during airbox removal. NTC thermistor should be 100k at 25 degrees C. If airbox runs hot it will shut down the engine. Think about rerouting the gearbox vent out of the airbox and running to an external pod filter to keep the airbox cooler.
· Ambient Air Pressure Sensor – Located under the instrument cluster behind the headlight, the sensing tube must be pointing down otherwise it can get clogged with crap.
· Rollover Sensor – Like a crash switch, just in behind the rear brake reservoir. Can stop engine restarting, bike will run with it disconnected but don’t keep it like that as an EFI bike will continue to run upside down lying on your broken leg if you crash.
· Gear position sensor – Neutral switch sets neutral fuel map which restricts max RPM, if you have a switch fault it will give random neutral light and loss of power. Can disconnect the connector and bike will still run but with FI light on. Sensor is down by gear lever, just follow the loom up. 3rd 4th Gear switches limit power for emissions control in those gears changeover and can be disabled.
· Lambda Sensor – Senses O2 in the exhaust to trim the fuel mixture a little, this is turned off with Performance Mapping loaded. Located in the exhaust just below the radiator. Cold engine uses open loop and it switches to closed loop as soon as the lambda sensors reach their operating temperature, This might have something to do with the issue that few people have reported (the bike stalls after 10 secs. ECU will use open loop operation in warm engine also whenever there is enough engine load (acceleration). The O2 sensor is only a narrow band sensor and therefore hasn’t got much authority over fuel flow; it can only make slight adjustments, more for emission control.
· Fuel Pump Controller – Just electrical relays to supply power to the pump, pump check is to turn key on and listen for pump to prime – it runs for a couple of secs.
· Lambda Sensor Heater – Heater in the O2 sensor.
· Fuel Evaporation Valve – USA Models only
· Secondary Air Valve – Commonly called SAS, turned off with Performance Mapping loaded or can be manually turned off with TuneECU program. LH Side mounted by the side of the airbox up near the radiator. Can remove SAS completely but need to fit a resistor to remove FI light. Can turn off in TuneECU and remove system without having to fit resistors.

The following are part of the throttle body and it comes as one unit for a lot of money, KTM engineers answer to fault diagnosis is change the big bit first but they can be on back order for weeks:

· Throttle Position Sensor (Circuit A) – referred to as THAD in the KTM Manual, it is on the LH Side of throttle body and senses the throttle body butterfly valve position.
· Accelerator Position Sensor – referred to as APAD in the KTM Manual, RH Side of throttle body and senses the cable input from the throttle.
· Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor – On top of the throttle body. The engine ECU uses barometric pressure to get ideal air/fuel mixture, thinner air = less fuel. 1013 hPa at sea level and 15 degrees Celsius air temperature is normal pressure. Barometric air pressure will vary from 960 to 1050 hPa. 988 hPa is normal with engine off, when you start the engine and rev it, more suction = less pressure.
· Motor Drive – this electrical motor drives the throttle body butterfly valve.
· Motor Drive Hall Sensor
· Motor Drive Voltage.

These are monitored circuits that you can’t do much about:

· CAN Bus Communication electronic communication between system components.
· EPT Motor Drive RelayPermission – Probably electrical relays





Here are some pictures of the internal gears in the throttle body.

To get inside, you have to drill out two riveted screws.
The TPS sensors are plain old regular keihin TPS sensors. These things have been used on almost every throttle body Keihin have produced, and also used on all the old FCR carburettors that have TPS.
















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Old 12-06-2014, 10:24 PM   #5
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Fault Table C - Stalling and throttle issues

(Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on Stalling and throttle issues). Click Here

Carry out the following
· Throttle sensor check/adjustment (Values change depending on year model)
· Idle CO check/adjustment

HINTS AND TIPS: 2008-2010 690's all have a plastic gear in the throttle body that wears out and eventually slips back to idle, "limp" mode. Wide open everything seems OK- most of the time. The wear eventually causes stalling and erratic throttle. Partial throttle open, as in most off-road situations, the gear is in the "slip" area due to the stripped or worn gear.2011+ throttle body has a metal gear.




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Old 12-06-2014, 10:25 PM   #6
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Fault Table D – Engine not even turning over when you press the button

· Check Battery Volts sufficient
· Check Voltage at starter motor and ground connection integrity
· Check all fuses
· Check relay operation
· Check starter operation with independent power source





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Old 12-06-2014, 10:25 PM   #7
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Fault Table E - EFI – No FI Light

· Test – With the spark plug removed and attached to the plug lead and with its body firmly grounded on the engine casing hit the start button immediately after key on, if you are consistently getting 5 or 6 sparks before they stop then the EFI controller is performing its checks and sensing a condition that's causing it to shut off the ignition.
· This means a sensor has reached a limit and provided a fuel cut signal to shut the engine down. For safety this only happens at idle so the symptoms are that the engine will not start or it runs roughly and cuts when you return throttle to idle.
· Check Roll Over Sensor – Disconnect it and it should then run if this was at fault.
· Refer to Fault Table B for more info on sensors.





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Old 12-06-2014, 10:26 PM   #8
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Fault Table F - Reluctant starting:

· Check Battery Volts sufficient and starter turning over at normal speed – if not remove valve cover and check decompressor mechanism and actuating pin.
· Check valve clearances
· Fuel Injector Nozzle not shutting off and dribbling fuel on shutdown - Use Mobile Injector Cleaning Service to clean, service and check injector




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Old 12-06-2014, 10:27 PM   #9
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Fault Table G – Noises

· Top End noise is indicative of incorrectly shimmed valves or more commonly Rocker Bearing failure – Remove valve cover and inspect rocker bearings, there are premod and post mod rockers but both types can fail, catch these quick and replace them before they take out the cam as well. Will also cause poor starting. More info here: http://ktm690.info/index.php/690_Hal...r_arm_bearings
· Rattle from LH Side is the timing chain if the noise is constant, if the noise is momentary on start up then it can be a lazy Hydraulic Cam Chain Tensioner – replace or fit a Rally Raid Manual tensioner.
· Rattle from LH Side is normally the clutch – play in the roller bearing behind the clutch or wear in the clutch basket grooves allow the plates to rattle.





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Old 12-06-2014, 10:27 PM   #10
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Fault Table H - Electrical:

·
Check Battery Volts – Should be 13.0v if it was fully charged, flick ignition on to simulate electrical load and it should only reduce slightly, big drop means a poor battery.

· Check Regulator / Rectifier output – Put multimeter on the battery leads and if you can, start the engine, should see an increase of voltage 13.5 - 15 volts indicating it is charging the battery. It should be a steady voltage, if it spikes then the RR is faulty.
If you cannot start the engine then do the following Static Test:
Label the input stator wires on the regulator A,B, and C, the order does not matter.
Label the power red wire and the negative green wire on the regulator rectifier D, and E respectively.
Set Multimeter to diode test and attach the Red probe of the meter to the red power lead (D) and the black probe of the meter to each of the three stator contacts ( A, B, C) . Should be OL and no beep. Then swap around the meter leads (red and black are swapped) and take the readings again. Should beep and indicate resistance in ohms, resistance at A,B,C should be about the same.
Now attach the black probe of the meter to the green negative lead (E) and the red probe of the meter to each of the three contacts ( A, B, C) . Should be OL and no beep. Then swap around the meter leads (red and black are swapped) and take the readings again. Should beep and indicate resistance in ohms, resistance at A,B,C should be about the same.
NOTE: You can replace the stock voltage regulator with a FH008BA MOSFET based regulator from a 07-11 CBR 600. ($50 off eBay, same as those $150+ MOSFET regs, just have to splice into the existing wiring harness). The OEM thyristor based Regulator Rectifier gets to about 200-350 degrees F (93 – 176 deg C) and will burn you if you touch it, whereas the Shindengen MOSFET Type is just Warm to the touch at approx 100 Degrees F (37 deg C). MOSFET is an acronym for Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor it works on a different principle and therefore can operate cooler. A major advantage of the MOSFET unit is the stability of the charging voltage. Even at tickover with lights on and fan running, you'll still see somewhere between 13.8 and 14 volts. Just above tickover the voltage rises to somewhere in the region 14.3 volts and stays rock steady throughout the rev range, ideal for an EFI bike. This shows installation of the FH008 into a 990.
http://www.ktmforum.co.uk/adventure/...tallation.html


·
Check brown electrical connector from stator LH Side of engine on frame about inline with the piston/barrel – These go rotten after a while, suggest you replace the connector before it fails with a waterproof sealed connector such as 3P MetriPack 280 Connector featured here, about half way down this webpage:
http://www.easternbeaver.com/Main/El...onnectors.html
Here is how to assemble the connector:
http://www.wikihow.com/Assemble-Weather-Pack-Connectors
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuL5ZU_SviI

· Check the stator – (See attached connector pic) If you’ve got a voltmeter set it to ohms, test resistance between pins 1 & 2 and then between 1 & 3 and then between 2 & 3 each should be no more than 1 ohm at 20deg C, then check each pin to ground for possible short circuit should be open circuit (infinite resistance).



Should be easy to spot the problems with burned wires and epoxy once you take the cover off




Here is a useful video on stators.

http://www.roadstercycle.com/Roadstercycle.com%20Videos.htm

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Old 12-06-2014, 10:28 PM   #11
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Fault Table I – Ignition

· Check spade connectors to the Ignition coil – re-crimp if lose
· Check plug cap condition
· Unscrew HT Connection to plug cap and cut off a few millimeters then re-screw into plug cap
· Try new spark plug - Thermal shock of river crossing can cause the central electrode to crack





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Old 12-06-2014, 10:28 PM   #12
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Fault Table J – Fuel

· Check audible fuel pump noise when the key is turned on – check power to pump
· Check inline fuel pressure – fit temp gauge or sender and check for 50 psi
· Maybe an airlock in the line -try and purge the air out of the line by cracking the injector line
· Check injector inlet connection to see if inline filter is installed – a Tech Bulletin was issued fitting a little top hat filter in the inlet connection to the injector and it can block really easy, best removing it and throwing it as they are nothing but trouble. More info here: http://www.dirtrider.com/features/pr..._line_filters/
· Clean injector – Use Mobile Injector Cleaning Service to clean, service including: check injector spray pattern, flow rate and leaks/seepage when shut off.
· Check fuel tank vent lines are clear and unrestricted
· Access the Fuel Pump in the tank and check for:
- kinked lines,
- electrical connections
- disconnected fuel line
- blocked inlet screen
- Check inline filter for blockage

HINTS AND TIPS:
Pump can cut out when hot – indicative of failure so change it.
When checking fuel pressure if you do not have a gauge then pull the pipe of the injector and put your thumb on the end, flick the key on and you can feel if there is enough pressure to push your thumb off the connection, obviously watch out for spraying fuel on you and hot exhausts.




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Old 12-06-2014, 10:29 PM   #13
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Fault Table K - General Wiring

· Many wiring faults occur in the Battery/Fuse Box area and the terminal connections to the relays in this area.
· Also remove the battery and battery tray and check for chafed wires under the tray and any visible connections.
· Carry out general inspection of all looms for damage / chafing
· Check all electrical grounds and clean paint from the surfaces to make a good connection, once connected spray with a wax rust proofer. There are three grounds:
- Motor/starter motor to frame, braided line
- Battery to frame. (-) on battery
- Regulator rectifier to frame. (2x green wires).
· Check all harnesses for possible chafing, reroute and tywrap as required.





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Old 12-06-2014, 10:29 PM   #14
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Fault Table L – Air

· Check rubber sleeve has not disconnected between throttle body and airfilter box.





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Old 12-06-2014, 10:36 PM   #15
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Fault Table M – Clutch

· Clutch lever pulls to the bar and doesn’t operate – Slave cylinder seal leaking or lack of fluid.
· Clutch lever only pulls in a bit and hydraulic locks – Check master reservoir is not overfull.





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