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Old 01-21-2008, 06:50 PM   #31
Solaros1
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I learned to ride on a CB160 that belonged to one of my neighbors - many fond memories of that bike. My first bike was a CL77 305 Scrambler.
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Old 01-22-2008, 12:36 PM   #32
dduelin
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Here is the 1966 CB160 I resurrected last spring. I replaced the oil and tires, cleaned the carbs, set the points and rode it for a few weeks around the neighborhood while the seller searched for the title. It was never found so he bought it back from me per our arrangement. The bike was great fun to ride - I wish now I just kept it and tried to get around the title problem.

It was in better shape than I really knew at the time.
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Old 01-22-2008, 12:48 PM   #33
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This is the classic Honda I am fooling around with now. 1982 C70 Passport with 19,500 miles on it! Still shifts well, burns no oil, and after some electrical work all the lights and charge system plus the usual fuel system root o rooting it runs like when Reagan was still chopping wood. I can see keeping this one a while. 100 mpg while getting milk and bagels. I guess I should post in over in Battle Scooters. Honda still had the new front fender and a chain case in the warehouse. That was the extent of parts needed plus some vigorous rust removal and spot painting.

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Old 01-22-2008, 04:38 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dduelin
This is the classic Honda I am fooling around with now. 1982 C70 Passport with 19,500 miles on it! Still shifts well, burns no oil, and after some electrical work all the lights and charge system plus the usual fuel system root o rooting it runs like when Reagan was still chopping wood. I can see keeping this one a while. 100 mpg while getting milk and bagels. I guess I should post in over in Battle Scooters. Honda still had the new front fender and a chain case in the warehouse. That was the extent of parts needed plus some vigorous rust removal and spot painting.

It's amazing how long-lasting this design was. I have a 1964 Honda CT200 (the single-year model number for the first year trail 90) Mine is shown in the background of the photo below (missing its seat). Park the two together, and they would definitely look like siblings.

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Old 01-22-2008, 04:44 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dduelin
Here is the 1966 CB160 I resurrected last spring. I replaced the oil and tires, cleaned the carbs, set the points and rode it for a few weeks. . . I wish now I just kept it . . ..

It was in better shape than I really knew at the time.
ddudelin, I have similar regrets about passing this CB350 on to a new owner last fall. It was an easy restoration, basically I rebuilt the carbs, cleaned up the electrical connectors, replaced the battery and a few cables, and gave it a new coat of (non-original color) paint. Then I rode the heck out of it all spring and summer.

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Old 01-22-2008, 04:49 PM   #36
dduelin
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Yes, the step-through Honda in various displacements is still being built today in Honda factories in some third world countries. More than 50 million 50, 70, and 90cc bikes like this have been built since 1958 along with very similar trail bikes with the step-through "girl's frame".
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Old 01-22-2008, 04:59 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboy
ddudelin, I have similar regrets about passing this CB350 on to a new owner last fall. It was an easy restoration, basically I rebuilt the carbs, cleaned up the electrical connectors, replaced the battery and a few cables, and gave it a new coat of (non-original color) paint. Then I rode the heck out of it all spring and summer.

Sweet, same here. I bought this CB350K3 after the 160. I fixed it to running good in the spring and sold it summer. New tires, battery, tune-up kit and carb kits.

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Old 01-22-2008, 04:59 PM   #38
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Read this article, I know a few of these guys and this looks fun!

http://www.soundrider.com/archive/or...160_racing.htm
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Quote:
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your bike is suitably dirty. Well done.
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Old 01-24-2008, 10:50 PM   #39
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I spent some time in the garage this evening. I've now freed and lubricated all the old cables. They are all completely shot, of course, but I don't want to buy a lot of new parts until I have a better idea whether this bike will run for me. The old cables will allow me to test things without spending the money for new ones.

I also pulled the rear wheel off, and opened it up. The brakes were similar to the front: nearly new, with lots of life left in the shoes. Lots of rust on the drum as well, but that will rub off soon enough. The back has a fairly prominent groove in the drum, though, so after I detemine whether the bike will run, it will need resurfacing.

I put the rear wheel back together, and reinstalled it with a new chain. (I didn't mind this purchase: if the CB160 turns out to be a dud, I can use the new chain on my CT200.)

I also figured out why someone would park this bike with so few miles on it: they didn't! The speedometer cable was twisted in half, so the miles shown on the odometer are not accurate. I have no idea what the real mileage may be. I expect to find that the speedometer is frozen, so I'll be lubricating the movement before I try hooking it up with a new cable.

I also tried spinning the engine over with the starter, using jumper cables from a fresh battery. No action at all, so I'll be pulling the starter off to see what the problem is.

Sorry I didn't take my camera out to the garage tonight!
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Old 01-27-2008, 09:27 AM   #40
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Help!

I decided to clean the centrifugal oil filter before trying to start the CB160. When I opened it up, I found that both tabs on the cover had been broken off. I tried tapping around the edge, and I can see movement, but it never moves enough to get a hold on the edge to pull it out. I've also tried turning the cover by tapping with a chisel against the remains of the tabs. So far, that cover doesn't want to come loose. Any ideas out there?
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Old 01-27-2008, 12:30 PM   #41
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The good news is that since both tabs are broken off, you won't get the buzzy vibes at 9-10K rpm like I did after breaking just one of mine off.

It's been so long since I've looked inside one of those bikes at the filter lid, that I'm just thinking of the most basic mechanical solution - If the lid is thick enough, drill and tap two holes, maybe 4mm dia or 6mm dia. Put the holes precisely opposite each other on a concentric circle around the lid to avoid balance issues later. Insert bolts or screws into the lid an pull off carefully. Use a puller if needed to exert a straight and controlled force. Or buy some threaded rod the same size as the tapped holes and long enough to bottom out in the filter cannister. Continue tightening them evenly after they hit bottom and they should pull the lid free. Not too much unlike a home made drawbolt/rocker shaft puller I ginned up for the Ducati motors. I can get metric threaded rod from 4mm upwards at my local Ace Hdwe store.

Then look at how to deal with the screwholes for reassembly. Maybe use some headless allen socket screws like setscrews to plug the holes after removing the new "puller" screws. With a dab of blue Loctite each time.

The saving grace is that if the lid gets trashed, you could probably have a replacement turned from aluminum flat stock for cheap or by a talented friend with a lathe.
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Old 02-02-2008, 04:47 PM   #42
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It's alive!

I've made some real progress with the CB160 this weekend, culminating in a ten or twelve mile ride this morning!

I started with my last quandary: how will I get the lid off the oil filter so I can clean it out? I contemplated Mark's idea of drilling it, and making the whole lid into a makeshift puller, by tapping threads into the drilled holes, and running all-thread to the back of the filter. I decided to try again to get it off intact, by prying alternately from one side, athen the next.



I was able to work the lid off that way, without causing any damage.




There was a lot of dried crud inside, and general evidence that the filter does in fact remove particles of metal from the oil.



I had to buy a new shifter, as the original was broken. I also installed new clutch and throttle cables. I was able to free up the old brake cables by pouring light oil down the tubes.



Earlier, I had cleaned out the carbs, and reassembled them with their original gaskets, which appeared to be useable temporarily, if only to determine whether the engine had major problems.

The wiring seems to be intact, with the exception of battery cables, both of which were missing. I snagged a cable off a parts bike and grounded it to the frame to act as a temporary negative cable. I pulled the three-foot long cable off the starter, and ran it from the battery + to the solenoid. I had determined previously that the starter is not working, so my first attempts to start the bike would be with the kick starter. (CB160s had both kick and electric starters)

After hot wiring the ignition, since I have no key for it, I was ready to give it a try. I checked the points gap, which looked fine as it was. I kicked the engine over with the battery attached, and checked for spark at the points. Good! I checked for spark at the plugs too. Better!

Time for some fuel now. I ran new fuel hose from the petcock to the carbs, and for the cross-over under the tank. I put the tank back in place, and added fuel. After putting clamps on the petcock connections, the fuel stopped leaking.

Time to put the exhaust system back in place!



Now it's time to fire it up . (Cross your fingers!) It took a bit of hard breathing, and a whole lot of kicks, but one cylinder finally caught. It had a bit of trouble running, as it didn't want to idle on one cylinder. I pulled the fuel bowl from the carb on the left, which wasn't firing. Fuel was the problem. The bowl was dry. I had soaked the petcock in carb cleaner last weekend, but I had apparently neglected to blow air through it, as no fuel was coming through to the left carb. After cleaning out the petcock, I tried again. Success! Both cylinders now fired, though the bike still didn't want to idle. It was late at night, and I decided to wait and look at the carbs in the morning.

Morning came, and I pushed the bike outside. I gave it a kick, and to my great surprise, it fired right up, and even idled. Not well, mind you, but I'm not complaining! (Elves were apparently turning wrenches on the bike overnight.)

After fiddling with the idle air adjustment, it ran a bit better. It is a bit noisy, so a valve adjustment and cam chain adjustement are both on the schedule for next weekend. I put the footpegs back on, and took it for a spin around the yard. That went well enough, that I ventured across the road, and tried getting up some speed and shifting through the gears. There is a new development across the road, so I had a good five miles of dirt roads, where the streets wil be laid out in time. No traffic, and the whole place was mine. I rode for a good ten or twelve miles, shifted up and down and generally satisfied myself that this bike runs well enough to justify a larger investment.

Did I forget to mention that I was smiling ear to ear the whole time?

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Old 02-02-2008, 05:38 PM   #43
EvilClown
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Old 02-03-2008, 08:43 AM   #44
mark1305
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Too cool! Glad it's up and running.
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Old 04-13-2008, 03:19 PM   #45
Reverand Roadblock
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I have a '64 CB160 I need to get rid of. It's in fair shape. Motor turns over, tranny gears are rusty. White paint and chrome on tank pretty good. No title. If I can get $200 for it I will be a happy boy. It needs to go because the shop I was storing it in is closing and I don't want to keep it outside. Please someone adopt this poor soul.
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