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Old 03-07-2008, 11:20 AM   #46
Zerodog
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If you have a file you can deal with the peen job on the nuts. And blue loctite is your friend for reassembly of those puppies. I don't know what super plush is doing with the valving but I recommend an oil height of 100mm on 640As with the subtanks on.

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Originally Posted by meat popsicle
I was told that trick when I took the stacks to Super Plush And you're right about the factory loctite job on those threads - they might as well have just JB-Welded the mofo! Too bad the stoopid factory service manual says to disassemble them the way I did

I don't mind a lil' teasing, just wondering what the "for now" part implies... when I need to drill and tap the fork caps for your subtanks soon.

DIY revalve - well, I didn't want to have to deal with the factory-peened bolts and, ahem, a man's got to know his limitations eh? Glad to hear Cannon woke up - I am working on pressing the linkage arm bearings in so when the shock shows up I should be ready for it.
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Old 03-07-2008, 12:08 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zerodog
If you have a file you can deal with the peen job on the nuts. And blue loctite is your friend for reassembly of those puppies. I don't know what super plush is doing with the valving but I recommend an oil height of 100mm on 640As with the subtanks on.
Lots of info in this thread, and I've been told I'm-a chatty fooker, so let me note that I now have 0.52 springs for my 200lb arse (the 0.50s I had were the wrong ID and L) just in case that changes your recommendation.
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Old 03-07-2008, 12:14 PM   #48
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It might change a few things. Those are pretty heavy springs for you. Go for 110mm. You might need to trade them or one of them for a .50. But again that will depend on valving. The good part is with your bad ass orange jam nut tool you can swap springs pretty easy.
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Old 03-07-2008, 12:18 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zerodog
It might change a few things. Those are pretty heavy springs for you. Go for 110mm. You might need to trade them or one of them for a .50. But again that will depend on valving. The good part is with your bad ass orange jam nut tool you can swap springs pretty easy.
creeper liked his 0.52 springs, but only with your subtanks.

And yes your custom wrench is a damn fine tool for working on forks - good size and shape.
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Old 03-07-2008, 03:02 PM   #50
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Heavy springs are better than ones that are too soft. Especially on a heavy bike. I think you will love it over the stock settings that are best suited for a 12 year old girl.
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Old 03-16-2008, 02:47 PM   #51
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Question

I am reassembling my forks (just one for now until I get one more bottle of fork oil... ) and came across an issue: the rebound adjuster stops at the "softest" setting - all the way counter-clockwise - but not at the "hardest" setting when I turn it clockwise.

Any thoughts? The adjuster rod is in there...
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Old 03-17-2008, 07:28 AM   #52
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Do you have everything 100% assembled? If not that could be your issue. Cartridge rods tightened onto the caps and the caps tightened onto the legs? The plastic nub is in the rebound tube too right? Also did you check out your rebound needles and springs? They can get stuck and they can be really nasty. There are also a ton of clicks to that thing when put to 1 end or the other.
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Old 03-17-2008, 09:11 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zerodog
Do you have everything 100% assembled? If not that could be your issue. Cartridge rods tightened onto the caps and the caps tightened onto the legs? The plastic nub is in the rebound tube too right? Also did you check out your rebound needles and springs? They can get stuck and they can be really nasty. There are also a ton of clicks to that thing when put to 1 end or the other.
Everything is completely assembled. Rebound needle and spring verified free by the tuner, who replied back to me about this asking if I had moved the rebound clicker while disassembled. Said I could have moved it outside its normal operating range, so that is where I will start today. I only turned the rebound clickers to the soft (-) stop, but perhaps that was enough.

The manual says there should only be 28 clicks on the rebound adjuster; 30 clicks on the compression adjuster down below.
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Old 03-17-2008, 09:52 AM   #54
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Do the rebound rods go boing boing when you push on them? They should move up and down easily like they are on a spring. You might have more clicks then 28 too. Those #s are not set in stone by any means. If you went full counter clockwise I don't imagine you hurt anything in your caps.

This might be a dumb question but why do you have your forks together without your oil? Just test fitting?
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Old 03-17-2008, 10:12 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zerodog
Do the rebound rods go boing boing when you push on them? They should move up and down easily like they are on a spring. You might have more clicks then 28 too. Those #s are not set in stone by any means. If you went full counter clockwise I don't imagine you hurt anything in your caps.

This might be a dumb question but why do you have your forks together without your oil? Just test fitting?
Just one leg... I am expecting a very small shipment from Red Line.

Thanks for the tip ZD, I'll check the rebound mechanism when I take the cap off.
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Old 03-24-2008, 12:16 PM   #56
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Replacing the Linkage Arm Bearings

Here is a post on my complete experience doing this task – finally finished!

Since I had never replaced bearings before I got some good guidance from a knowledgeable friend who knows this specific application. This is essential because there is nothing more tragic than a little bit of knowledge in the wrong hands. And even trying to apply a good bit of knowledge to new situations can lead to disaster. Anyways my friend told me:

Don't worry about getting the old ones out... worry about getting the new ones in nice and straight and square. Just drive the old ones out… then use the shaft and washers to "press" the new ones in. Or a long bolt and washers if that's easier. Make sure the washers are thick and hardened, put some grease on the threads... and grease on the outsides of the new bearings too.

Out with the Old
So I used a variety of implements - various tool bits, like the right sized socket and an extension - think it was a hefty screwdriver - to pound out the old bearings and seals. I sprayed the crap outa it with WD-40 the day before to help loosen things up and provide a bit of lube. There is an adequately sized hole on the starboard side of the motorcycle, which is probably there to allow you to do this very job. I had to give the implements a pretty good series of whacks with a hammer to drive out the old, but it wasn’t difficult.

In with the New


It was pretty easy in the beginning, and the bearings pressed well, but more importantly: “nice and straight and square”. Then they stopped going in and I found out that even with the very helpful guidance above there was a bit of a learning curve to finding the right widgets to press bearings in different applications. I went through quite a few attempts using bits acquired from a handful of trips to the hardware store. New additions to the odd hardware jar:



The trouble I found was the part of the shaft that rides on the bearings extends beyond the width of the bearings and seals. This picture will give you a good idea of the relative width of the bearings/seals and the portion of the shaft wide enough to contact them:



I believe this is a design feature because the swingarm linkage is designed to “self-center” (thanks Allgo; see his post about this on Page #2) or move laterally a few mm to keep it from binding. Note: it appears there may be enough space for a third bearing between the two bearings specified by the parts fiche, so don’t just keep driving the bearings! They should only go far enough in to make room for the seals.

So after figuring out that was my problem, I thought I would need to find hardened washers that had the same ID and OD as the bearings and seals in order to press them all the way in using the shaft. I did not find any such washers, so I switched to using a long bolt and nut with some additional washers.



This worked OK, but I found that without the shaft’s diameter the nut and bolt didn’t stay “nice and straight and square”… and not following the guidance is bad.

So I finally came across a post by crazybrit recommending using a socket to press bearings; that got me thinking. I ended up using the shaft, the hardened washers I purchased, and an odd nut that is somewhat like a socket. The odd nut allowed me to pull a trick: it pulled the shaft far enough to that side to keep the thick middle portion out of the way on the other side so I could use some store-bought hardened washers to press the bearings far enough inside to make room for the seals. This is important because the seals are not stout enough to press the bearings out of their way.

Don’t forget the assembly lube eh? You probably are fine using some of your bearing grease, but I went ahead and bought some assembly lube; it wasn’t expensive.

The only thing I never figured out was which way the seals went? I just guessed, but since I now know this assembly needs more frequent inspections I will be back here before long.
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meat popsicle screwed with this post 03-25-2008 at 09:56 AM
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Old 04-08-2008, 11:31 AM   #57
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HOWDID I assemble the front end

If you haven’t done it yet, loosely install the triple clamps (don’t adjust the steering head play yet).



Slide the fork tubes into the triple clamps. The picture below shows the handlebars installed, but I did that after installing the fork tubes. I wedged an appropriately sized allen key into the upper clamp and then used a standard screwdriver to lever the lower while I slid a fork tube up and into place. Releasing the lever on the lower will hold the fork tube where you left it while screwing around with guiding it into the upper clamp or changing out the allen key for a better size. No need to stretch out the clamps, so only use the size allen key necessary to allow the fork leg to slide into place.



You can now loosely install the front axle without the wheel (not as pictured). I used this as a place to pull on the forks while adjusting the steering head play. HERE is a thread with the manual’s guidance. I adjusted it now, but only tightened the center pinch bolt, leaving the other 8 on the clamps until I have done the front-end alignment procedure. I will recheck the steering head play at the end too.



Front-end alignment procedure: EDIT: see HERE for Zerodog's method.



I have a roller!



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meat popsicle screwed with this post 07-29-2008 at 08:32 AM
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Old 04-08-2008, 11:49 AM   #58
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Looking good Meat!

An outfit called trailgate tailgates sells this little bearing tool for KTM non-linkage bikes.

http://www.trailgatetailgates.com/pb...40325051235739

Don't know if it would help getting the linkage bearings out and back in or not...

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Old 04-08-2008, 12:37 PM   #59
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Looking good Meat!

An outfit called trailgate tailgates sells this little bearing tool for KTM non-linkage bikes.

http://www.trailgatetailgates.com/pb...40325051235739

Don't know if it would help getting the linkage bearings out and back in or not...

Those were pretty easy to drive out, and once I had a clue and got the right widgets they were pretty easy to press. That is a nice lil' tool, but it looks like CBC contraband...
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Old 04-08-2008, 01:35 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meat popsicle
That is a nice lil' tool, but it looks like CBC contraband...
Speaking of which, I need to renew my membership!
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