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Old 03-20-2014, 03:05 PM   #1
trululu96 OP
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Location: MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA
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Dad and son RTW trip in two KLR 650

Hello fellow riders so as said above me and my dad will go on a RTW trip on early august we just bought two brand new klr 650 (we live in colombia so the price sucked almost $11000 for each one )


after reading a lot of treads I decided to put some farkles on ! so basically this tread is for showing the preparation of the bikes, the trip it self and of course our preparation.

The farkles that have arrieved so far are:

-Super brace forkbrace
-high output stator from ebay, teorically it should pull 280 w
-EBC 320mm front rotor and eagle mike caliper plate
-FMF Jet kit
-Rigid industries dually lights (one flood and one spot for each bike)
- Complete lever kit with torsion spring for rebuilding the doohikckey and upgrading the carb bolts (from eagle mike)
-Long mixture screw
-yoshimura RS-2 slip on

here are some pics (from the farkles that just arrieved, the bikes are still in the dealership)
IMG_2964[1]

IMG_2968

IMG_2969

IMG_2971


IMG_2972


IMG_2973

IMG_2974


So there are some farkles that havent arrieved yet, which are:
-Cogent moab shock
-Cogent springs with DDC
-Some cheap amazon aftermarket footpegs
-ATO fuse upgrade from arrowhead
-Local brand aluminium panniers
-K&N air filter
-UFO low fender
-scottoiler
-acerbis mud guard

I got a couple of concerns about the motorbike
1) do you think that is a good idea to do a RTW trip with an aftermarket exhaust ? I mean mainly about the regulations in each country (I dont mind the sound of it !)
2) What about the fmf jet kit? would it heavily affect the fuel economy ? is it any good for easier tunning of the carburator ?
3) any sugestions of aftermarkets parts or needen mods ?

And so far I also have a question about the route that I'll take, we will depart on late august so we were planning to go east (from Medellin, Colombia), first Venezuela and then Brazil, Finally argentina and from there take a plane to Cape Town but at the moment Venezuela is extremely dangerous so we just diched that idea. The plan b is to go south into the andes region but it will be cold down there, so any alternative route that you could think of would be awesome or also any recomendations for riding in cold weather !

Thanks and I'll update as soon as get the motorcycle from the dealer which i suspect will be in a week or so.

Sorry for bad english and complete lack of mechanical knowledge
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trululu96 screwed with this post 03-20-2014 at 03:17 PM Reason: apologising for stupidity.
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Old 03-21-2014, 09:59 AM   #2
sebanks
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Don't Bother With Farkles

1985 - 1986 i did an RTW with two other people. We rode Honda XL250s. Our trip took 13 months (50,000km) and went through SE Asia, Australia, India/Nepal, across the African Continent and north across the desert to the Med and into Europe. Your bikes will become part of you. The things that make your bike comfortable or uncomfortable, high performance enough or not, pretty enough or not will become invisible. You wiil adapt and you and the bike will become one. I think the only things we did to the XLs before the trip was gusset the frames where they were prone to breaking (they broke anyway and we had to repair them on all three bikes), installed serviceable aftermarket airfilters (K&N?), installed aftermarket fork springs (stock were prone to sagging), installed crashbars and short clutch and front brake levers. You will fall off and the better the bike is protected, the better off you are. Your primary concerns with the bikes will be three: First, security of the motorcycles: Travelling on a motorcycle is like travelling with a two year old child, you have to be consciously thinking about it all the time, particularly in less-developed parts of the world. If they're not secured in the courtyard of your hotel or someplace similar, you have to be looking at it. Period. All the time. This is an aspect and limitation of travelling on a motorcycle that needs to be acknowledged, particularly on an RTW trip where you are dependent on your equipment and, because you'll have Carnets, leaving a country without your bike is a major problem(In other words, don't lose it!) When we camped, particularly in Africa, we stacked all our gear in the middle of the tent (6-man), put our sleeping bags at the two sides and the back and pushed the front wheels of all three bikes through the door of the tent and cabled them together. Second, maintenance. All the time. Change your oil every 1000 miles like religion. Grease all greaseable fittings at every oilchange. Make sure the fittings are taking grease. Grease the steeringhead bearings when they get notchy. You don't need to replace them, but you do need to grease them. Oil the chain every day, unlesss you're in the desert, then clean it and run it dry. Resume oiling when you leave the desert (There's disagreement on this strategy but it worked for us). Install a serviceable air filter and clean it every other oil change or so; keep an eye on it. Do some research on the KLR and find out what breaks and take spares: we had a piston and rings, CDI module, drive chains and countershaft sprokets (1set for each bike), inner tubes, other stuff I don't remember. Plan your tire replacements. When we did our trip, we had to go from Australia to Europe without access to replacement tires and we each carried two. We made it, but barely! Bring tools to install spares. Bring a shop manual. Third, lighten up: you need a whole lot less stuff than you think you do. Oh, and fourth: have fun!
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Old 03-21-2014, 10:14 AM   #3
trululu96 OP
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About the motorcycle

Hello sebanks the more I read the more I'm convinced I truly need to look after my motorcycle! that puts me kind of nervous but well... I guess it has to be that way. We will be running in synthetic oil so do you believe it is completely necessary to change oil every 1000 miles, from what i read the change could be done every 4500 miles or so.

thanks
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Old 03-21-2014, 10:50 AM   #4
sebanks
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Originally Posted by trululu96 View Post
Hello sebanks the more I read the more I'm convinced I truly need to look after my motorcycle! that puts me kind of nervous but well... I guess it has to be that way. We will be running in synthetic oil so do you believe it is completely necessary to change oil every 1000 miles, from what i read the change could be done every 4500 miles or so.

thanks
No doubt synthetic oil will help. The question will be availability. I did my trip almost 30 years ago and we had to pay attention to the availabilty of even gasoline (hell, in the subsistence economies of central Africa, we even had trouble getting food; we lived for weeks at a time on bananas, peanuts, canned sardines and the occasional chicken we'd barter for and slaughter) Youll have to do some research into what's available in terms of parts, fuel and lubricants in different parts of the world (we had to reline our brakes in Dar es Salaam using brake linings from a Land Rover and shapping them to fit with a beltsander!). I like your idea of shipping into South Africa. The thing i didn't mention in my earlier post was shipping; when we did our trip, the shipping was a big deal, it took a long time to arrange and then several weeks in transit. The nice thing was that it gave us time away from the bikes and we used that time to do stuff that would have been difficult wuth the bikes, we went to Chiang Mai, Phuket and Bali while they were in transit to Australia, we went trekking in the Himalayas and then hung out in Kathmandu while they were in transit to Bombay, and we went on safari at Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti and spent time in Zanzibar while they were in transit to Dar es Salaam. Shipping into Port Elizabeth or Capetown means that you're shipping into a 1st world port, much, much easier.

As far as servicing the bikes, yup, you're going to need to figure it out. I'd start by reading the owners manual, then changing the oil, cleaning the air filter, then try taking the front and rear wheels off. Installing your farkles will help, too! Read the service manual (Remember, in my post above I suggested getting a service manual? It's important!) go slow, you'll be fine. once you start, you'll start building confidence and you'll keep getting better.

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Old 03-23-2014, 06:17 AM   #5
Grinnin
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Originally Posted by trululu96 View Post
3) any sugestions of aftermarkets parts or needen mods ?
You have the Rigid lights which are 700g each. That's heavy enough to require a sturdy light bar or crash bar. It looks like you have their regular brackets which will break on smooth gravel before you get to any kind of rough road.

Make whatever mods you want, but I'd want to test everything A LOT on shorter trips on rougher roads.
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Old 03-23-2014, 06:31 PM   #6
trululu96 OP
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Hey sebanks thanks for the suggestions, about the service manuals we are surely going to get one. Hopefully I'll put the mods on myself (with the help of a trained mechanic of course haha) to start getting familiar with the bikes. About the shipping we are going to ship it by plane so in theory they will arrive in the same plane than us (kind of expensive but we don't have the additional 15 days that It would take by boat). The oil is a problem but If we don't find any synthetic oil then we will have to change the oil after a 1000 miles !
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Old 03-23-2014, 06:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin View Post
You have the Rigid lights which are 700g each. That's heavy enough to require a sturdy light bar or crash bar. It looks like you have their regular brackets which will break on smooth gravel before you get to any kind of rough road.

Make whatever mods you want, but I'd want to test everything A LOT on shorter trips on rougher roads.

Yes I forgot to write that down, we are also buying crash bars, but the idea was to relocate the front turn signals and somehow make a mount that fits there and attaches to the frame (just an idea, what do you think about it ?)

And yes we will do at least 5000 miles of testing before departure in August !

Greetings
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Old 03-25-2014, 06:46 PM   #8
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Do yourself a huge favor and dismantle the bikes when you get them and regrease the steering head bearings, and rear swingarm and pivot linkages, all of these will have very little grease on the actual bearings. Use marine grease. Waterproof grease. I would run the stock exhaust not the after market one because they will need repacking after a while. The stock one is a bit heavier but you won;'t notice the difference once you are fully loaded. Use a UNI air filter and thier oil for it, keep the stocker as a spare and take it with you in a baggie already oiled. Take new air filter oil with you. You can clean the filters with gas. Buy a stainless steel oil filter....but do not use it until you have changed your oil twice. Then install it. Use the paper filters for the first 2 changes. Change your oil after 100 miles first then again after 500....then swap to the S/S filter. You can wash it out with gas also, then wash gas out with water and shake dry...After you have run your engine in change your oil at 3,000 mile intervals.....or 5000 if you are using synthetic. BUT you must fully run engine in on regular oil not synthetic or the rings will not seat in the bore. Go to a specific KLR forum and search all they say about usual problems....do not ask just read and search...if you ask you will get more useless info than usefull info. Make a tool tube out of ABS 4" plumbing pipe and store your tools in that inside an old leather sleave off a coat soaked in WD40 so the tools do not rust. Carry both front and rear tubes, a small compressor, 3 small tire irons, complete patch kit and two cement tubes. One will always be empty when you need it!. Set your carb up for sea level basically.....if you are using factory jet sizes, they would be 145 main jet and the stock pilot jet. IF the needle is adjustable set it on the 3rd from the top slot. Drill out your slider to exactly 7/64th that is the hole nearer the edge of the slider. Unplug the pilot jet screw and gently seat screw then back out 2 1/4 turns. Make sure your valeves are set at the widest gap allowable. Clean out your oil screen it will be 1/3 plugged after a few oil changes with assembly silicon strings. Do the DOO....use a torsion spring if you can as it will last the longest. Sell the tools to do it afterwards except one set, I see you bought two sets.
Buy a spare clutch cable and run it along side of the original and tape the ends to keep the crud out. Do not oil your cables, it attracts dirt and grit. Personally I have two coils,CDIs and voltage rectifiers on my bike as you can not fix them on the road when they go bad. I have them already bolted close to where the originals are so it's simply a matter of moving the wiring to the new unit. Carry a spark plug. I suggest that you unplug every electrical connection the bike has and install dilectric gease in all connections. Check for rub spots and re-enforce wiring harness. I suggest adding 1" to the length of each fork spacer in the forks. I run then so they are sticking out of the fork tubes when the wheel is off the ground by 1 inch....then force them in the forks. Works for me. Buy a spare set of sprokets and a chain. I run a 16 tooth front as I find that works best for me and reduces the engine RPMs by 500.
If you want more info ask. I ride long distances all the time.
Hope this helps....lol
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Old 03-25-2014, 08:38 PM   #9
sebanks
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Good Counsel, Willys

Quote:
Originally Posted by willys View Post
Do yourself a huge favor and dismantle the bikes when you get them and regrease the steering head bearings, and rear swingarm and pivot linkages, all of these will have very little grease on the actual bearings. Use marine grease. Waterproof grease. I would run the stock exhaust not the after market one because they will need repacking after a while. The stock one is a bit heavier but you won;'t notice the difference once you are fully loaded. Use a UNI air filter and thier oil for it, keep the stocker as a spare and take it with you in a baggie already oiled. Take new air filter oil with you. You can clean the filters with gas. Buy a stainless steel oil filter....but do not use it until you have changed your oil twice. Then install it. Use the paper filters for the first 2 changes. Change your oil after 100 miles first then again after 500....then swap to the S/S filter. You can wash it out with gas also, then wash gas out with water and shake dry...After you have run your engine in change your oil at 3,000 mile intervals.....or 5000 if you are using synthetic. BUT you must fully run engine in on regular oil not synthetic or the rings will not seat in the bore. Go to a specific KLR forum and search all they say about usual problems....do not ask just read and search...if you ask you will get more useless info than usefull info. Make a tool tube out of ABS 4" plumbing pipe and store your tools in that inside an old leather sleave off a coat soaked in WD40 so the tools do not rust. Carry both front and rear tubes, a small compressor, 3 small tire irons, complete patch kit and two cement tubes. One will always be empty when you need it!. Set your carb up for sea level basically.....if you are using factory jet sizes, they would be 145 main jet and the stock pilot jet. IF the needle is adjustable set it on the 3rd from the top slot. Drill out your slider to exactly 7/64th that is the hole nearer the edge of the slider. Unplug the pilot jet screw and gently seat screw then back out 2 1/4 turns. Make sure your valeves are set at the widest gap allowable. Clean out your oil screen it will be 1/3 plugged after a few oil changes with assembly silicon strings. Do the DOO....use a torsion spring if you can as it will last the longest. Sell the tools to do it afterwards except one set, I see you bought two sets.
Buy a spare clutch cable and run it along side of the original and tape the ends to keep the crud out. Do not oil your cables, it attracts dirt and grit. Personally I have two coils,CDIs and voltage rectifiers on my bike as you can not fix them on the road when they go bad. I have them already bolted close to where the originals are so it's simply a matter of moving the wiring to the new unit. Carry a spark plug. I suggest that you unplug every electrical connection the bike has and install dilectric gease in all connections. Check for rub spots and re-enforce wiring harness. I suggest adding 1" to the length of each fork spacer in the forks. I run then so they are sticking out of the fork tubes when the wheel is off the ground by 1 inch....then force them in the forks. Works for me. Buy a spare set of sprokets and a chain. I run a 16 tooth front as I find that works best for me and reduces the engine RPMs by 500.
If you want more info ask. I ride long distances all the time.
Hope this helps....lol
Good of you to put together info specific to the KLR. I did my RTW on a Honda XL and it did fine. The KLR is a solid platform and if they take care of them -- how the ride them, how the maintain them -- they'll go as far as they want them to go. We kept our bikes pretty much bone stock figuring the OEM has addressed most of the problems in the design; aftermarket manufactueres, hard to know.

http://ith.ub5.outcrop.com/node/75/done?sid=3*to.
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Old 03-27-2014, 11:05 AM   #10
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I have been working solely on KLRs for 7 years now and I hope I know all there is to do with this simple machine by now.....lol.
As you say, KISS is the best appoach concerning too many aftermarket farkles, keep to the well know issues and solve those then go after creature comforts that your body requires. We are all different and all require different items to allow us to ride for extreme lengths of time and distances. What is good for one isn't always good for the next. BUT the over all bike maintenance is a simple issue to deal with. My way of thinking is to think where you are going to be at the worst possile location, then think what if this or that breaks, gives up or just stops working correctly. How will you deal with this? That is why I carry extra electrical items. Those are the few things on a semi modern bike that are unrepeairable with the typical small assortment of tools we carry. It's much easier to bolt a second item onto your frame and seal it up well ready for that possible time you may need it. The alternative may be a very long walk, wait or extremely expensive ride to get to a place where you can get one shipped to you. All because you wouldn't spend a few bucks now. The weight issue is not in the cards for sure items either imho.
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Old 03-27-2014, 11:34 AM   #11
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Great KLR advice from Willy's, do everything he has listed, especially the wire harness, shockingly bad quality. The KLR in stock trim is a good commuter bike but it needs a little bit of help to last an ADV ride. Good part is that the KLR has awesome aftermarket support, the list of mods I did for my trip kept the postman busy for weeks.

Couple of additional suggestions, remember to upgrade the rear subframe bolts, I assume the bikes will be pack mules, you don't want those to snap, I think Eagle Mike has these. Also the standard KLR seat can be a pain on long trips for some people, fix/change before you leave, you want to enjoy the trip.

Lay out all of your tools prior to starting the mods. Only take the tools you actually used to work on the bike, one good part about the KLR is that the tools list is relatively short.

Modify the bike to make it better, stronger, more reliable than is it stock. Mods added to camping gear/tools/etc. typically make the KLR a heavy beast so don't forget your suspension.

Have fun and good luck.
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Old 03-27-2014, 11:44 AM   #12
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Forgot to add, when I fitted the side bags to my KLR the helmet lock became useless. I fitted a license plate bracket (security screws) that had two helmet locks, available on fleabay. Almost missed this prior to my trip.
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Old 03-27-2014, 11:48 AM   #13
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When you do the subframe upgrade use the drill through version and not simply the harder bolts. Even if one of the harder bolts comes loose it will sheer the other side bolt from the movement over time. Again just at the worst possible time I bet. Then change out all philips head bolts and screws and change them for 8MM hex head bolts similar to the engine case bolts. This does two things, gets rid of the useless philips heads that will strip sooner than later and also takes one tool out of your tool pouch. There very few locations where philips head screws or bolts are.
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Old 03-27-2014, 11:50 AM   #14
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I use a 8 foot long piese of aircraft cable that is plastic coated with two eyes on it and a lock to keep all my gear safe when I leave the bike lets say at a store or resturant. I do not use the helmet lock any more but did relocate it to the rear of my pannier rack on the rear hoop just incase I ever want to use it again.
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Old 03-27-2014, 08:05 PM   #15
sebanks
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Amen, Brother

Quote:
Originally Posted by willys View Post
I have been working solely on KLRs for 7 years now and I hope I know all there is to do with this simple machine by now.....lol.
As you say, KISS is the best appoach concerning too many aftermarket farkles, keep to the well know issues and solve those then go after creature comforts that your body requires. We are all different and all require different items to allow us to ride for extreme lengths of time and distances. What is good for one isn't always good for the next. BUT the over all bike maintenance is a simple issue to deal with. My way of thinking is to think where you are going to be at the worst possile location, then think what if this or that breaks, gives up or just stops working correctly. How will you deal with this? That is why I carry extra electrical items. Those are the few things on a semi modern bike that are unrepeairable with the typical small assortment of tools we carry. It's much easier to bolt a second item onto your frame and seal it up well ready for that possible time you may need it. The alternative may be a very long walk, wait or extremely expensive ride to get to a place where you can get one shipped to you. All because you wouldn't spend a few bucks now. The weight issue is not in the cards for sure items either imho.
We carried a spare CDI all the way around the world. Of the three XLs one failed, and it failed near the end of the trip, in the middle of the Sahara Desert. With no warning.... And like you say, there's no amount of duct tape and chewing gum that solves that problem. Either you've got the part or you don't. And if you don't, better get to pushing. The other things about those sorts of failures is that they often occur with little or no warning, one second the thing is humming along, the next you're coasting to a stop. At least with mechanical failures, there's usually an indication that you've got a problem developing and you can plan how/where your going to fix it. Ignition, you've got nothing. I like the way you said it, imagine the worst scenario; now plan for that....
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