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Old 04-23-2009, 01:38 PM   #136
RottenScummyTroll
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This is a different tack, but can save some dough on the road for sure.

TIRES.

Learn to change 'em yourself, and you'll save a bundle. Heck, just one time and you'll pay for your tire levers.

Planning ahead on a long trip for tire changes and having them shipped to friend's house along the way can help too, buying tires online saves a good bit.

"But how do you break the bead on tubeless tires? I thought you need to have a special tire changer for that..."

Not so. In fact, all you really need to break the bead even on sportbike rims is 3 tire levers - and they don't even have to be super long. Here's how:

1. With the wheel on the ground, insert 2 tire levers between the rim and the tire about 12"-14" apart. Press these levers DOWN, toward the center of the tread.

2. Insert the 3rd lever about midway between the other two. However, instead of pressing down, instead pry UP on this lever AWAY from the center of the tread. This is putting direct pressure on the bead and moving it in toward the center of the rim, not just pressing on the sidewall of the tire like the other two levers.

3. Work the center tire lever back and forth between the outer two levers, prying upwards. The bead won't come loose if you just pry in one place, you have to "worry" it a little and work it down off the rim.

Once the bead is broken, proceed as normal. (I'll have to do a writeup on this with pics sometime. People almost always make tire changes harder than they really have to be, it's a pet peeve of mine.)

I was able to change both tubeless tires on my Strom in less than 45 minutes like this, using just 3 tire levers and a floor pump. Sure beats paying the dealer $30 apiece to do the same.

I should note that if you're doing this on the road, it's nice to do it at a gas station with air. Those tiny little 12-volt compressors sometimes don't move air fast enough to seal the bead on a tubeless tire. (CO2 cartridge pumps aren't a sure thing either - they move air fast enough, but not enough volume per cartridge.)
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Old 04-23-2009, 07:30 PM   #137
Dan Alexander
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$30 apiece, thats cheap ... you don't live anywhere near me
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Old 04-23-2009, 08:27 PM   #138
nnichols
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mocha_Monkey
Kinda old thread, but one of my favorites. Let's keep adding to it.

These things are as good as an otterbox for compact dry storage, but dirt cheap:



They come in all kinds of sizes. I use mine for electronics, papers, etc. that I want to keep 100% dry.

Wal-Mart has 'em, as well as many grocery stores.
That's a Lock & Lock. I've painted a few of them with camo Krylon Fusion paint and used them as geocaches. They don't leak, even after being outside for over a year.
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Old 04-23-2009, 09:35 PM   #139
BgDadddy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Alexander
$30 apiece, thats cheap ... you don't live anywhere near me
I just paid $30 each also. That included removing the wheels from the bike, R&R'ing the tires and balancing the wheels, putting them back on the bike and giving the bike the best wash its had since it was new.

I'd pay it again in a heartbeat!
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Old 04-23-2009, 10:50 PM   #140
perkgana
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they wanted $80 bucks to change my tire (XR650R) in a local shop... and no wash! (or balancing or anything)

but even if it was cheap I like working on my bike, plus its nice to practice for when you have to do it in the middle of nowhere.
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:05 PM   #141
perkgana
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Also this is worth knowing.

Usually the people that would help or offer you the most are the people that have the least. I dont want this to sound strange. But "most" of the times if you break down and try to get a ride from a guy with a trailer maybe pulling toys or whatever is harder than from the guy with a beater truck that you would think he is homeless.

A really nice experience was about a month ago when the only guy that actually helped was this "poor" or lets say simple and basic lifestyle person who lent me tools, gave me ideas, helped and he even gave me 2 books as a gift in case the fix didnt last long and I break down again and get bored.

He made the breaking down experience actually enjoyable and worth doing the trip even though I never reached my destination.
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Old 04-24-2009, 02:27 PM   #142
tuumi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mocha_Monkey
This is a different tack, but can save some dough on the road for sure.

TIRES.

Learn to change 'em yourself, and you'll save a bundle. Heck, just one time and you'll pay for your tire levers.

Planning ahead on a long trip for tire changes and having them shipped to friend's house along the way can help too, buying tires online saves a good bit.

"But how do you break the bead on tubeless tires? I thought you need to have a special tire changer for that..."

Not so. In fact, all you really need to break the bead even on sportbike rims is 3 tire levers - and they don't even have to be super long. Here's how:

1. With the wheel on the ground, insert 2 tire levers between the rim and the tire about 12"-14" apart. Press these levers DOWN, toward the center of the tread.

2. Insert the 3rd lever about midway between the other two. However, instead of pressing down, instead pry UP on this lever AWAY from the center of the tread. This is putting direct pressure on the bead and moving it in toward the center of the rim, not just pressing on the sidewall of the tire like the other two levers.

3. Work the center tire lever back and forth between the outer two levers, prying upwards. The bead won't come loose if you just pry in one place, you have to "worry" it a little and work it down off the rim.

Once the bead is broken, proceed as normal. (I'll have to do a writeup on this with pics sometime. People almost always make tire changes harder than they really have to be, it's a pet peeve of mine.)

I was able to change both tubeless tires on my Strom in less than 45 minutes like this, using just 3 tire levers and a floor pump. Sure beats paying the dealer $30 apiece to do the same.

I should note that if you're doing this on the road, it's nice to do it at a gas station with air. Those tiny little 12-volt compressors sometimes don't move air fast enough to seal the bead on a tubeless tire. (CO2 cartridge pumps aren't a sure thing either - they move air fast enough, but not enough volume per cartridge.)

Film it and post on youtube then here. This would be great to see.
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Old 04-24-2009, 03:57 PM   #143
nigelcorn
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I agree, I would love to not have to pay to have it done. I have a hard enough time breaking the bead on a dual-sport tire, I don't even want to try and a street bike tire.
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:19 PM   #144
WeeBee
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This video might be of interest - the guy is doing a tubed tire though, not tubeless, and is working with a stand, not on the ground. http://motocross.transworld.net/2008...p-tire-change/
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Old 04-24-2009, 05:02 PM   #145
WeeBee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nnichols
That's a Lock & Lock. I've painted a few of them with camo Krylon Fusion paint and used them as geocaches. They don't leak, even after being outside for over a year.


I've got one of these that I use to store/protect my Coleman Feather 442 stove in and to keep any fuel odors from the other stuff stored in my pannier. Bought it at Target for around $5 - the brand in my case is Sterilite and it's 12 cups or 2.8 liters in capacity - physical dimensions are 7"h x 6.75" x6.75".


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Old 04-30-2009, 08:15 AM   #146
kitesurfer
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my favorite camping food (that requires a campfire). baked potato and onion. wash the potato and wrap in alumnum foil. throw in the fire. put wrap the onion in tin foil and throw in the fire . substitute coals for fire if ya got um. i like a tun of butter with mine. the tub keeps better than the sticks if not refrigerated. takes an hour for the potatoe (with crunchy skin) and less for the onion. remove the cardboard roll from the aluminum foil and mas it flat. takes no space to keep.
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Old 06-22-2009, 04:45 AM   #147
magnus
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Cheap / light campstove

http://www.minibulldesign.com/

Alcohol burning stoves made from old cans. The guy who designs & makes these, Tinny, has a Youtube channel chock full of great ultralight cooking tips like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zS3A8etI-9U
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Old 07-23-2009, 08:19 PM   #148
j911brick
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How to seat tire bead

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hJFNuNoVfg
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Old 08-22-2009, 06:48 PM   #149
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Cheap food:

McD's $1 McDouble (double cheeseburger) + big mac sauce (free-$0.30 depending on where you are, but usually free). It's not healthy, but it's cheap and easy. Adding big mac sauce makes it a way better burger.

Chicken Franks (brands such as Gwaltney) can often be found for around $1 / pack of eight. Not as tasty as beef franks, but super cheap. I'll eat half a pack with ketchup and mustard packets for lunch, and the other half for dinner.

Bananas. Mashed with peanut butter for "Banana Supreme" as my mom called it when I was a kid. And by the way mixing and mashing are not the same. There's bananas mixed with peanut butter, which is just bananas and peanut butter. Then there's bananas mashed with peanut butter, which is Banana Supreme. Then there is always the Banana Supreme sandwich.

If you want a lot of cheap nachos: stop by 7/11, grab the big "make your own nachos" container, set bag of chips aside, fill up plastic container with the a few pounds of free chili, cheese, and other condiments you want, place a few chips from the included chips on top of your pounds of chili and cheese as camouflage, and buy a big back of tortilla chips to go with your chili and cheese. I know some will say this is wrong, but I was given the idea from a 7/11 employee back in college. For less than $5, I could get chili cheese nachos for 10.
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Old 08-28-2009, 11:18 PM   #150
Sparrowhawk
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I'll throw in a couple of thoughts.

My first budget travel was '73 spring break. A buddy on a CB350 and me on my Mach III left Tacoma, Wa for SoCal. We packed camping gear, 2 lb. bologna, a loaf of white bread, and a jar of mayo at the start of the trip. Bologna sandwiches and water rationed for three meals a day. When we made it to Big Sur we ate out once and got burgers. Then it was 2 lb. salami, a loaf of wheat bread (healthy ya know), and a jar of mustard to get us home. Two bikes from Tacoma to Big Sur and back for 11 glorious days for $66 total expenses including fuel. Yes, gas was cheap but we never ate at restaurants (except the once) and never paid to camp.

Lessons learned then and since:
  • Grocery stores and markets are the cheapest places to get food. You can live quite happily on crappy food for a while if that's the difference between taking a trip and staying home.
  • Alcohol is the quickest path to overspending - anywhere in the world.
  • Arriving late, leaving early, and not making much noise are the keys to free camping.
  • The amount of money you spend doesn't change how much fun you have on the road.
  • Be friendly, polite, thankful, and don't look scruffy or odd. People will open up.
  • Don't sweat the tool kit and spares too much. Passers by will help if they see you in need. There is a solution to your problem.
  • Adding a few red pepper flakes will make most food taste better. Save up the free to-go packets at pizza parlors.
  • If you are totally self sufficient, have everything you need, and never get in a bind you'll miss out on the generosity of your fellow man and not make as many friends as you could have.
  • Do what you can to stay out of hospitals. Same with jails.
  • If you see somebody that needs help, stop and do what you can. It doesn't matter if they are on a motorcycle, bicycle, cage, or walking. It doesn't matter if you speak the same language. You will be glad you did.
  • Ramen, a couple of spoonfuls of peanut butter, and some red pepper flakes taste almost like pad Thai.
  • Keeping your stuff dry is good.
  • The number of locals you meet is inversely related to the size of your group. You are more approachable if you travel solo, especially on a motorcycle. If you run into trouble while riding solo, you won’t have your old friends to help you out. Instead, you’ll meet new ones.
  • Having more time is better than having more money.

Sparrowhawk screwed with this post 08-29-2009 at 12:24 AM
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