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Old 03-09-2014, 06:46 PM   #1
Mattleycrue76 OP
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Shims for LC8 valve adjustment

Quick question:

I'm going to have a go at a valve check/adjustment on my 990 ADV shortly. I was wondering if these are the correct shims for my bike.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/390769017249...84.m1423.l2649

I realize I may not need any once I tear into it but I'm fine just having them on hand for the future. I just want to make sure they're the right size(s) before I order the whole kit.

Other than that and a feeler gauge, do I need anything else? (other than standard tools of course).

Thanks

Matt
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Old 03-09-2014, 06:48 PM   #2
Head2Wind
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Yes, those will fit
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Old 03-09-2014, 06:53 PM   #3
Head2Wind
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since I didn't answer the 'tools' question.

It makes it easier if you have a set of bent feeler gauges, but not necessary. You will also need to have a method of turning over the engine, which is a 14mm allen, will remove the plug from the alternator side of the engine as well as engage the flywheel bolt to allow you to turn the engine.

I typically bring the rear cyl to TDC, make measurements and record, if necessary to make alterations, the cam bridge and cams get pulled now, then rotate engine CCW to TDC front, measure and adjust as needed and reassemble cams and bridge, then rotate BACK CW to rear TDC to replace the required/calulated shims, cams and bridge, then rotate full CCW and recheck clearances. A wood rod that will easily fit down into the spark plug hole works as a excellent TDC indicator. In my experience, when you are comfortable with the process, the 'stop bolt' is not necessary to hold the engine at TDC.....
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Old 03-09-2014, 07:12 PM   #4
Pete640
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Its worth taking your time on the first valve check to remove the valve covers and measure the tolerances with (as Ken has said) bent feeler gauges To get the right "feel" use a micrometer that is set to the feeler width and get used to the effort that it takes to pull it back and forward.
Once you have the gaps listed go ahead and remove the bridges/cams one cylinder at a time and measure all of the shims. From there its just math to work out what needs changing if any.
The benefit of doing this is that you can order the shims you need specifically. and if you go to a harley dealer you can get them in 0.025 increments as opposed to 0.05 from KTM. Im pretty sure that you can also get aprillia and suzuki in the 0.05 increments as well but that would need to be confirmed. Now I dont know about the rest of the world but here in Aus ive found the HD shims to be less than 1/2 price of the KTM offerings and given they are more accurate they work for me.
Once you have the required shims change them out and you have an accurate record of what the gaps/shims are installed.
If your that way inclined you can even buy a set the next size or two smaller for you next change. Very specific!!!
In my experience its the intakes that tend to reduce but the exh tend to stay or slightly go out. Maybe due to the carbon build up????? Cant confirm that one.
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Old 03-09-2014, 07:27 PM   #5
Mattleycrue76 OP
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Thanks for the replies. I have heard of the Harley shims. Being that KTM offers them in 0.05 vs the Harley 0.025 increments will I really find myself wishing I had the finer adjust ability? I like the simplicity of ordering one kit and having it on the shelf for the future with a bunch of different sizes to choose from. I will make sure to get a set of bent feeler gauges.
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Old 03-09-2014, 07:51 PM   #6
wcohl
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Matt,

I just did a valve adjustment on my 950 SM. At 24,000 miles only one valve was tight, just barely. Since it was a Saturday night and nothing was open, I made the shim the size I wanted. It took about 6 minute of polishing/sanding the shim in a circular motion on a piece of emory paper. I only had to remove .0015". Now all my clearance are towards the mid to loose side of the range.

I bought the engine lock stud from Cycle Zone because none of the local hardware store had an 80mm long bolt with threads along the full length.
The price was only a few $. I think with shipping it was less than $10.

Looked over the procedure in HOW. I like the gear driven cam vs chain driven. The last bike I owned that needed different shims was a 4 valve in line 4 cylinder. I hated pulling both cams.
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Old 03-09-2014, 10:26 PM   #7
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I would suggest a high quality Allen wrench( mounted to a socket so you can properly tourqe) to remove the cam bridge bolts.
5 mm or 6 mm don't remember off hand. I had a bit of issues with this with mine. Next time around I will order new cam bridge bolts to have on hand. Buggered a few up with my craftsman socket allen!
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Old 03-10-2014, 05:41 AM   #8
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All good advice!
Agree on the cam-bridge bolts. Use good quality tools.
I made a crankshaft locking bolt out of threaded bar (M8). Filed a rounded pointy end.
Much easier if you remove the radiator when you do the front cylinder.
The plug which you need to remove in the left side crankcase (14mm allen key) is plastic so easily damaged. Don't overtighten when replaceing, just snug.
Take your time.
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:31 AM   #9
keener
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I have done several valve clearance checks on my 950 but to this day I am not 100% on my thing:

Is the feeler gauge that slides in with little resistant the right one? I can push and wiggle in a range of feelers, some hard to pull out.

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Old 03-10-2014, 07:42 AM   #10
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Shim Calculator

measured clearance minus desired clearance plus existing shim size = needed shim
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Old 03-10-2014, 07:52 AM   #11
Katoom72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRW View Post
I would suggest a high quality Allen wrench( mounted to a socket so you can properly tourqe) to remove the cam bridge bolts.
5 mm or 6 mm don't remember off hand. I had a bit of issues with this with mine. Next time around I will order new cam bridge bolts to have on hand. Buggered a few up with my craftsman socket allen!
Sounds familiar...
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Old 03-10-2014, 10:49 AM   #12
scorpion
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I picked up the entire Hot Cams shim kit off ebay a few years ago. .05 increments. works great and IIRC was like $65

Highly recommend the CJ Designs wrench tools for the job.

I just finished a check yesterday and found that removing the radiator made it way easier for me to adjust the front cylinder. I was going to check the water pump seal anyway.
YMMV
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:56 AM   #13
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Shims don't always measure what they're marked. That's why buying a kit often saves trips to buy and delays to get running again. If you have riding buddies who have a bike which uses 10mm shims, ask if they have a kit you can borrow. Tell them you will put a shim back in the kit (in the correct bin) for every shim you use. I've lent my kit out many times and have never run out of shims. The shims don't wear out, they just lose their markings. That's not an issue since you have to measure the shim you are installing anyway.
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Old 03-13-2014, 07:33 PM   #14
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I'll add my vote for making sure you don't re-install cam bridge bolts that are even remotely rounded. I spun one out and BARELY got it out using an old school hammer driven impact wrench after removing the rear fender where the ABS mounts to get better access... it was a pain but could have been worse

I have a spare set of new bolts on hand now for the next valve check. They're pretty affordable
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Old 03-14-2014, 04:58 AM   #15
ABuck99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRW View Post
I would suggest a high quality Allen wrench( mounted to a socket so you can properly tourqe) to remove the cam bridge bolts.
5 mm or 6 mm don't remember off hand. I had a bit of issues with this with mine. Next time around I will order new cam bridge bolts to have on hand. Buggered a few up with my craftsman socket allen!
I found one of the bridge bolts pre-buggered( and prob over torqued) by who ever had done previous valve check- and I couldnt get it out. Nuclear option was to use a nice sharp chisel to break it free and back it out. Had to order a replacement bolt though, and like CRW & Tony, I ordered a few in both sizes to keep spares on hand now. (A fairly simple job turned into a 10 day session waiting on parts).
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