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Old 05-06-2009, 01:42 AM   #6406
datol
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Nuts to this

I will bite, with no research (figure that's cheating)

Bolt would be externally wrenching, 4 sides, a hex, 12 point.

A screw would be internally wrenching, blade, phillips, hex (allen bolt which is actually a socket head cap screw), spline.

Dane

edit: ok, I am wrong, but I disagree with the accepted difference, so that makes me, ah, still wrong
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datol screwed with this post 05-06-2009 at 01:48 AM
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Old 05-06-2009, 06:38 AM   #6407
grinder96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datol
I will bite, with no research (figure that's cheating)

Bolt would be externally wrenching, 4 sides, a hex, 12 point.

A screw would be internally wrenching, blade, phillips, hex (allen bolt which is actually a socket head cap screw), spline.

Dane

edit: ok, I am wrong, but I disagree with the accepted difference, so that makes me, ah, still wrong
Yours sounds the best so far!!!!
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Old 05-06-2009, 09:22 AM   #6408
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What a great weekend!

A little bit late, but I have a good excuse!
I started working on Monday!!! FINALLY!!!!
(now I just need to survive till my 1st paycheck - in two weeks! damnit!)
Things are kinda hectic as I'm now trying to settle into my new schedule.


=======
SATURDAY
It started out with me leading a group of Scooters (and some Motorcycles) around town, thru the Hollywood Hills ending at a big BBQ!

Can you find the FFs? There are two in the picture, with a possible 3rd that might join us in the future.


Some of the bikes taking up both sides of the street (click for bigger)


Leading! (I'm at the front of this group)


BBQ!


More of my pics:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sognix/...181137/detail/


SUNDAY

I want to thank Joel for being my "ghost rider", wouldn't have been able to make it without you! I had a BLAST!
And yes, ADV is represented, I registered... altho now they're going to be bugging me to get you all to donate and/or volunteer.

The red-carpet treatment...
uh... okay, I don't belong on that carpet... where is the FFs entrance?


Getting 'em addicted early


Is this anyone of you?


These guys are INSANE!


Cutie singing the National Anthem, then it's "Start your engines!"


Getting to the bikes:


Ready to go!


It almost looks like I'm leading again, damnit!


... but there's plenty of people in front of me too, I was actually near the front and still there was a big group ahead!



Hey! What's the holdup??? (Police officers waiting on and blocking traffic up ahead)



Yes, that light turned red, and yes, I ran it! And so did thousands of bikes behind me!
(notice the Police Officers blocking traffic on the sides)


Didn't get the pic, but audience gave the Police Officers a standing ovation. "Just don't try that (running lights) on the way home - we'll be waiting". heh


And finally, the stars of the show - the reason why we are all there. The kids! Brain Tumor Surgery survivors.



More
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sognix/...322090/detail/
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Old 05-06-2009, 10:32 AM   #6409
Ben99r1
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Joel. Good looking out for a fellow ff. Sergio. Nice pics and way to rep. at the ride. Congrats on the new job. So how vacation weesk do you get a year? Ben
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Old 05-06-2009, 01:18 PM   #6410
cribaby
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike toon
A screw is only up to a certain size. 10 I believe. Bolts I believe starts at 1/4".
+1 - but I think a screw goes up to size #12.

Charlie
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Old 05-06-2009, 01:33 PM   #6411
JAB
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My research shows that it is better to be screwed than bolted.
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Old 05-06-2009, 01:51 PM   #6412
mike toon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cribaby
+1 - but I think a screw goes up to size #12.

Charlie
Right you are. Not too common, at least in my garage.

" 12-24 An American screw size still common for rack
mounting equipment particularly in the US telecommunications industry. It has 24 threads per inch. Again, the first number refers to the drill size required for a tapped (threaded) hole (a #12 drill is 0.189"). The outside diameter of a 12-24 screw is 0.2160 ". It is larger than a 10-32 screw."
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Old 05-06-2009, 05:33 PM   #6413
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bolt vs screw

Hey riders, first post long time lurker. I will have too hook up with you all as i ride all the time but work gets in the way. Here is your bolt vs screw deff . Cheerhttp://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider/friday.gifshttp://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider/naughty.gif

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2002-05-09, Rev. 2002-06-03. 2002 Garrett D. Euler
Bolt versus Screw Definition

The correct definition of bolt and screw is as follows.

Bolts are defined as headed fasteners having external threads that meet an exacting, uniform bolt thread specification (such as M, MJ, UN, UNR, and UNJ) such that they can accept a nontapered nut. Screws are defined as headed, externally-threaded fasteners that do not meet the above definition of bolts.
Because various organizations have thoroughly confused everyone regarding this simple definition, the remainder of this article dispels several myths and discusses the full rationale explaining the above, correct definition.

(1) Several dictionaries, Machinery's Handbook, part specification sheets, military specifications, bolt manufacturers, and vendor catalogs are wrong and have botched the above, unambiguous definition. Their definitions of bolt versus screw are arbitrary, random, ambiguous, nondefinitive, and do not align with common sense. Having "credible" sources such as Machinery's Handbook, ASME, ISO, and military specification sheets misusing and arbitrarily misdefining the words throws the whole world off. Then eventually most dictionary authors follow suit and copy some arbitrary version of the incorrect definitions floating about. All of these incorrect definitions and misuses, no matter how credible the source may otherwise seem, should be completely ignored. It should be apparent to you that technical definitions that make no sense are not credible.

(2) Another major confusion factor is the fact that bolt threads are sometimes generically referred to as "screw" threads in specifications, even though they are actually bolt threads, in an attempt to generically refer to the threads themselves, whether internal or external and regardless of which part they exist in. Words can have more than one definition, and this particular usage of the word "screw" is an attempt to describe helical threads simply in reference to the act of screwing. Using the word "screw" when "screwing" is meant does not cause a bolt, whose threads meet the specification of bolt threads, to be suddenly metamorphosed into a screw. If the threads meet the specification of bolt threads, such that they can accept a nut (regardless of whether you install a nut or not), then the threads themselves would more aptly be called "bolt threads" in the specifications, instead of "screw threads," to dispel confusion, as the nut is no more a screw, by the strict definition, than a bolt is a screw.

(3) Let us get the record corrected with the previously-stated, correct definition, which stands unaffected by several other factors. And let us now, by stating the correct facts, dispel several myths that have no affect upon the above definition.

The extent to which the shank of a fastener is threaded, whether fully or partially, does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts can come fully or partially threaded, as do screws.

Whether or not a nut is installed does not affect the above definition in any way. Common sense tells you a bolt is not suddenly metamorphosed into a screw each time you extract the nut (if you chose to install a nut instead of using the bolt in a threaded hole, insert, or nutplate); nor is it suddenly transformed into a screw each time you choose to not use the bolt but just let it sit there on a table unused.

Bolts are untapered. Screws are often tapered but can also be untapered.

Screws always cut their own internal threads when initially installed, as there is generally no tool meeting the arbitrary specification of their threads to tap out the internal threads beforehand. Conversely, however, it is possible for a bolt to be self-tapping. The only criterion in regard to the bolt versus screw definition is whether or not the self-tapping fastener, non-cutting threads meet the strict specification of bolt threads, meaning they can be correctly mated with a nut.

The type or size of head on a fastener does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts come with almost every imaginable head; screws do also, including hexagonal. Likewise, the configuration of the driving (or holding) tool surfaces in the head, whether internal or external surfaces, does not affect the above definition in any way.

The fastener nominal diameter does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts do not suddenly and mysteriously no longer accept nuts just because they become small, miniature, or micro.

The term "machine screw" is a misnomer. A bolt, clearly having bolt threads, is not suddenly metamorphosed into a screw just because someone arbitrarily misnamed it in a specification, book, organization, or industry.

Whether or not specifications incorrectly or loosely refer to bolt and nut threads as "screw threads," or even erroneously refer to bolts as "screws," does not suddenly transform the bolt into a screw. The inability of the technician who drafted the specification to master or understand language, grammar, measurement systems, coherent, unambiguous, internationally-standard units of measure, correct mathematical expressions, etc., does not mean the coherent engineers are suddenly thrown into an abyss without coherent definitions. Intelligent engineers must be able to sort out the technical facts from among the fiction and typos. Whenever someone has botched definitions, world class organizations such as ISO and IEEE need to step up to the plate and redirect the incoherent, aimless, arbitrary, lower-level entities. All of these incorrect definitions and misuses of the word "screw" should be completely ignored, as there is no need to continue to copy past mistakes and propagate confusion. The previously-stated, correct definition should be used in new specifications, standards, and publications.

Return to Structural Analysis Reference Library. 2002 Garrett D. Euler
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Old 05-06-2009, 05:49 PM   #6414
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bolt vs screw

h8; how did i do?
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Old 05-06-2009, 05:51 PM   #6415
knlkern
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danadog
Hey riders, first post long time lurker. I will have too hook up with you all as i ride all the time but work gets in the way. Here is your bolt vs screw deff . Cheer

The correct definition of bolt and screw is as follows.

Bolts are defined as headed fasteners having external threads that meet an exacting, uniform bolt thread specification (such as M, MJ, UN, UNR, and UNJ) such that they can accept a nontapered nut. Screws are defined as headed, externally-threaded fasteners that do not meet the above definition of bolts.
Because various organizations have thoroughly confused everyone regarding this simple definition, the remainder of this article dispels several myths and discusses the full rationale explaining the above, correct definition.

(1) Several dictionaries, Machinery's Handbook, part specification sheets, military specifications, bolt manufacturers, and vendor catalogs are wrong and have botched the above, unambiguous definition. Their definitions of bolt versus screw are arbitrary, random, ambiguous, nondefinitive, and do not align with common sense. Having "credible" sources such as Machinery's Handbook, ASME, ISO, and military specification sheets misusing and arbitrarily misdefining the words throws the whole world off. Then eventually most dictionary authors follow suit and copy some arbitrary version of the incorrect definitions floating about. All of these incorrect definitions and misuses, no matter how credible the source may otherwise seem, should be completely ignored. It should be apparent to you that technical definitions that make no sense are not credible.

(2) Another major confusion factor is the fact that bolt threads are sometimes generically referred to as "screw" threads in specifications, even though they are actually bolt threads, in an attempt to generically refer to the threads themselves, whether internal or external and regardless of which part they exist in. Words can have more than one definition, and this particular usage of the word "screw" is an attempt to describe helical threads simply in reference to the act of screwing. Using the word "screw" when "screwing" is meant does not cause a bolt, whose threads meet the specification of bolt threads, to be suddenly metamorphosed into a screw. If the threads meet the specification of bolt threads, such that they can accept a nut (regardless of whether you install a nut or not), then the threads themselves would more aptly be called "bolt threads" in the specifications, instead of "screw threads," to dispel confusion, as the nut is no more a screw, by the strict definition, than a bolt is a screw.

(3) Let us get the record corrected with the previously-stated, correct definition, which stands unaffected by several other factors. And let us now, by stating the correct facts, dispel several myths that have no affect upon the above definition.

The extent to which the shank of a fastener is threaded, whether fully or partially, does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts can come fully or partially threaded, as do screws.

Whether or not a nut is installed does not affect the above definition in any way. Common sense tells you a bolt is not suddenly metamorphosed into a screw each time you extract the nut (if you chose to install a nut instead of using the bolt in a threaded hole, insert, or nutplate); nor is it suddenly transformed into a screw each time you choose to not use the bolt but just let it sit there on a table unused.

Bolts are untapered. Screws are often tapered but can also be untapered.

Screws always cut their own internal threads when initially installed, as there is generally no tool meeting the arbitrary specification of their threads to tap out the internal threads beforehand. Conversely, however, it is possible for a bolt to be self-tapping. The only criterion in regard to the bolt versus screw definition is whether or not the self-tapping fastener, non-cutting threads meet the strict specification of bolt threads, meaning they can be correctly mated with a nut.

The type or size of head on a fastener does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts come with almost every imaginable head; screws do also, including hexagonal. Likewise, the configuration of the driving (or holding) tool surfaces in the head, whether internal or external surfaces, does not affect the above definition in any way.

The fastener nominal diameter does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts do not suddenly and mysteriously no longer accept nuts just because they become small, miniature, or micro.

The term "machine screw" is a misnomer. A bolt, clearly having bolt threads, is not suddenly metamorphosed into a screw just because someone arbitrarily misnamed it in a specification, book, organization, or industry.

Whether or not specifications incorrectly or loosely refer to bolt and nut threads as "screw threads," or even erroneously refer to bolts as "screws," does not suddenly transform the bolt into a screw. The inability of the technician who drafted the specification to master or understand language, grammar, measurement systems, coherent, unambiguous, internationally-standard units of measure, correct mathematical expressions, etc., does not mean the coherent engineers are suddenly thrown into an abyss without coherent definitions. Intelligent engineers must be able to sort out the technical facts from among the fiction and typos. Whenever someone has botched definitions, world class organizations such as ISO and IEEE need to step up to the plate and redirect the incoherent, aimless, arbitrary, lower-level entities. All of these incorrect definitions and misuses of the word "screw" should be completely ignored, as there is no need to continue to copy past mistakes and propagate confusion. The previously-stated, correct definition should be used in new specifications, standards, and publications.
DANG IT!!
That was my second guess!!
Welcome Aboard DD!!
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Old 05-06-2009, 06:03 PM   #6416
danadog
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me

Thanks for the welcome. I follow all your reports as i jones to ride everyday as others out there do. Maybe i can hook up with some of yah this saturday as it looks to be nice out. Twist a grip and rip, words to live by. Dana dog!
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Old 05-06-2009, 06:24 PM   #6417
MOOSEBOY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danadog
Hey riders, first post long time lurker. I will have too hook up with you all as i ride all the time but work gets in the way. Here is your bolt vs screw deff . Cheerhttp://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider/friday.gifshttp://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider/naughty.gif

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2002-05-09, Rev. 2002-06-03. 2002 Garrett D. Euler
Bolt versus Screw Definition

The correct definition of bolt and screw is as follows.

Bolts are defined as headed fasteners having external threads that meet an exacting, uniform bolt thread specification (such as M, MJ, UN, UNR, and UNJ) such that they can accept a nontapered nut. Screws are defined as headed, externally-threaded fasteners that do not meet the above definition of bolts.
Because various organizations have thoroughly confused everyone regarding this simple definition, the remainder of this article dispels several myths and discusses the full rationale explaining the above, correct definition.

(1) Several dictionaries, Machinery's Handbook, part specification sheets, military specifications, bolt manufacturers, and vendor catalogs are wrong and have botched the above, unambiguous definition. Their definitions of bolt versus screw are arbitrary, random, ambiguous, nondefinitive, and do not align with common sense. Having "credible" sources such as Machinery's Handbook, ASME, ISO, and military specification sheets misusing and arbitrarily misdefining the words throws the whole world off. Then eventually most dictionary authors follow suit and copy some arbitrary version of the incorrect definitions floating about. All of these incorrect definitions and misuses, no matter how credible the source may otherwise seem, should be completely ignored. It should be apparent to you that technical definitions that make no sense are not credible.

(2) Another major confusion factor is the fact that bolt threads are sometimes generically referred to as "screw" threads in specifications, even though they are actually bolt threads, in an attempt to generically refer to the threads themselves, whether internal or external and regardless of which part they exist in. Words can have more than one definition, and this particular usage of the word "screw" is an attempt to describe helical threads simply in reference to the act of screwing. Using the word "screw" when "screwing" is meant does not cause a bolt, whose threads meet the specification of bolt threads, to be suddenly metamorphosed into a screw. If the threads meet the specification of bolt threads, such that they can accept a nut (regardless of whether you install a nut or not), then the threads themselves would more aptly be called "bolt threads" in the specifications, instead of "screw threads," to dispel confusion, as the nut is no more a screw, by the strict definition, than a bolt is a screw.

(3) Let us get the record corrected with the previously-stated, correct definition, which stands unaffected by several other factors. And let us now, by stating the correct facts, dispel several myths that have no affect upon the above definition.

The extent to which the shank of a fastener is threaded, whether fully or partially, does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts can come fully or partially threaded, as do screws.

Whether or not a nut is installed does not affect the above definition in any way. Common sense tells you a bolt is not suddenly metamorphosed into a screw each time you extract the nut (if you chose to install a nut instead of using the bolt in a threaded hole, insert, or nutplate); nor is it suddenly transformed into a screw each time you choose to not use the bolt but just let it sit there on a table unused.

Bolts are untapered. Screws are often tapered but can also be untapered.

Screws always cut their own internal threads when initially installed, as there is generally no tool meeting the arbitrary specification of their threads to tap out the internal threads beforehand. Conversely, however, it is possible for a bolt to be self-tapping. The only criterion in regard to the bolt versus screw definition is whether or not the self-tapping fastener, non-cutting threads meet the strict specification of bolt threads, meaning they can be correctly mated with a nut.

The type or size of head on a fastener does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts come with almost every imaginable head; screws do also, including hexagonal. Likewise, the configuration of the driving (or holding) tool surfaces in the head, whether internal or external surfaces, does not affect the above definition in any way.

The fastener nominal diameter does not affect the above definition in any way. Bolts do not suddenly and mysteriously no longer accept nuts just because they become small, miniature, or micro.

The term "machine screw" is a misnomer. A bolt, clearly having bolt threads, is not suddenly metamorphosed into a screw just because someone arbitrarily misnamed it in a specification, book, organization, or industry.

Whether or not specifications incorrectly or loosely refer to bolt and nut threads as "screw threads," or even erroneously refer to bolts as "screws," does not suddenly transform the bolt into a screw. The inability of the technician who drafted the specification to master or understand language, grammar, measurement systems, coherent, unambiguous, internationally-standard units of measure, correct mathematical expressions, etc., does not mean the coherent engineers are suddenly thrown into an abyss without coherent definitions. Intelligent engineers must be able to sort out the technical facts from among the fiction and typos. Whenever someone has botched definitions, world class organizations such as ISO and IEEE need to step up to the plate and redirect the incoherent, aimless, arbitrary, lower-level entities. All of these incorrect definitions and misuses of the word "screw" should be completely ignored, as there is no need to continue to copy past mistakes and propagate confusion. The previously-stated, correct definition should be used in new specifications, standards, and publications.

Return to Structural Analysis Reference Library. 2002 Garrett D. Euler


Sorry guess again.

"Is it a bolt or a screw?" is like saying is it a gasoline engine or is it internal combustion engine? The terms aren't identical but there is a LOT of overlap.



For "most" common aplications a screw has a slotted or phillips head, in other words screws use screwdrivers.


screw


27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000 http: fpdownload.macromedia.com pub shockwave cabs flash swflash.cab#version='6,0,0,0"'>
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 /skru/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [skroo] Show IPA
–noun
1.a metal fastener having a tapered shank with a helical thread, and topped with a slotted head, driven into wood or the like by rotating, esp. by means of a screwdriver.
2.a threaded cylindrical pin or rod with a head at one end, engaging a threaded hole and used either as a fastener or as a simple machine for applying power, as in a clamp, jack, etc. Compare bolt 1 (def. 3).





Generally speaking bolts are larger and have hex heads.




bolt127CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000 http: fpdownload.macromedia.com pub shockwave cabs flash swflash.cab#version='6,0,0,0"'>
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 /boʊlt/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [bohlt] Show IPA
–noun
1.a movable bar or rod that when slid into a socket fastens a door, gate, etc.
2.the part of a lock that is shot from and drawn back into the case, as by the action of the key.
3.any of several types of strong fastening rods, pins, or screws, usually threaded to receive a nut.





As you can see both use the other in the definition.

I hope this helps to muddy up the water some.




Moose
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Old 05-06-2009, 07:28 PM   #6418
NSFW OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danadog
h8; how did i do?

First of all, welcome to the local FF community.

your definition is pretty extensive and you are right. Many answers are correct. Thanks for everyone's input.

Here's a simple definition and easy to remember.

The Difference Between a Bolt and a Screw













Abolt is designed to be inserted through a hole and secured with a nut, while a screw is designed to be used in a threaded hole—sometimes along with a nut. To learn more, see the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standard B18.2.1 (1996).

Not sure where sheet metal and wood screws fall into, but I would classify them in the same category as regular screws since they don't need a nut.


Remember, if you will bolt something... you will need a NUT. If you're screwing someone...you are the NUT!

As a reward to all of you...you get the chance to see Cathy, Johngil, and FMFPunk's power water crossing.........






&nbsp
&nbsp
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Old 05-06-2009, 07:29 PM   #6419
danadog
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true meaning of bolt and screw

Bolt; is what i do after the bell rings at work. And screw is what you do with your other half!
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Old 05-06-2009, 08:01 PM   #6420
NSFW OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SogniX
A little bit late, but I have a good excuse!
I started working on Monday!!! FINALLY!!!!
(now I just need to survive till my 1st paycheck - in two weeks! damnit!)
Things are kinda hectic as I'm now trying to settle into my new schedule.


=======
SATURDAY
It started out with me leading a group of Scooters (and some Motorcycles) around town, thru the Hollywood Hills ending at a big BBQ!

Can you find the FFs? There are two in the picture, with a possible 3rd that might join us in the future.


Some of the bikes taking up both sides of the street (click for bigger)


Leading! (I'm at the front of this group)


BBQ!


More of my pics:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sognix/...181137/detail/


SUNDAY

I want to thank Joel for being my "ghost rider", wouldn't have been able to make it without you! I had a BLAST!
And yes, ADV is represented, I registered... altho now they're going to be bugging me to get you all to donate and/or volunteer.

The red-carpet treatment...
uh... okay, I don't belong on that carpet... where is the FFs entrance?


Getting 'em addicted early


Is this anyone of you?


These guys are INSANE!


Cutie singing the National Anthem, then it's "Start your engines!"


Getting to the bikes:


Ready to go!


It almost looks like I'm leading again, damnit!


... but there's plenty of people in front of me too, I was actually near the front and still there was a big group ahead!



Hey! What's the holdup??? (Police officers waiting on and blocking traffic up ahead)



Yes, that light turned red, and yes, I ran it! And so did thousands of bikes behind me!
(notice the Police Officers blocking traffic on the sides)


Didn't get the pic, but audience gave the Police Officers a standing ovation. "Just don't try that (running lights) on the way home - we'll be waiting". heh


And finally, the stars of the show - the reason why we are all there. The kids! Brain Tumor Surgery survivors.



More
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sognix/...322090/detail/

hi sergio.. nice to see pics from the ride. hundreds of riders participated and good they didn't miss many of us.....

congrats on the new job.....hope you like it...
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