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Old 04-01-2008, 02:50 PM   #31
JStrom
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Ned, can you elaborate on Point 7? I've never heard of spraying everything with WD-40 (but that ain't saying much)

thanks
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Old 04-01-2008, 05:37 PM   #32
TimberlineAdventure
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JStrom
Ned, can you elaborate on Point 7? I've never heard of spraying everything with WD-40 (but that ain't saying much)

thanks
I actually have something that works better in my opinion... It is called Corosion Bloc, it is a marine electrical board protectant & I have been using it for years. You can spray it on everything: plastic, decals, metal, electrical equipment, etc.... I have used if for wax for years on a car and it protects like you can not imagine, and is less greasy than WD40. You can get it at places like Boat US. I dont mean to cloud your advice Ned, you seem like the master of all maintenance...
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Old 04-02-2008, 08:26 AM   #33
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Put a dab of silicone electrical grease the inside of your spark plug cap rubber.

The fender washer on the end of the throttle tube is a great idea. Might I suggest a nylon washer? (lighter, less rattling)

I differ on my prefernce for cable lube. I use a light silicone oil or TriFlow with a power luber every spring. I take this opportunity to inspect the ends of the cable for any kinks or fraying. The cables usually break at the upper end near the lever. At the first sign of wear, replace the cable.

If you have a worn clutch cable, and you are Hyper-Anal-Retentive (moi), keep the old cable & zip-tie it along the new one. You now have a functional spare in place.

Tire tip: Run only the ultra heavy duty tubes. Yeah, it's a little heavier, but you'll save yourself a lot of time repairing pinch flats on the trail. By safely enabling lower tire pressure, you'll also have much better control in the rocks. Replace tubes when they start showing excessive chaffing, or excessive corrosion around the valve stem nut. A smear of anti-sneeze around the valve stem nut will slow the galvanic corrosion caused by contact with the aluminum rim.

For my trail bikes, I'm guessing that the hours of run time are close to the hours of wrench time. It pays off.

Ned, lemme know if you're still interested in coming up for a shock party. No, not that kind of party. We'll keep Wuds away.
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HellSickle screwed with this post 04-02-2008 at 08:32 AM
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Old 04-04-2008, 01:42 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HellSickle
, A smear of anti-sneeze around the valve stem nut will slow the galvanic corrosion caused by contact with the aluminum rim.
The nut should actually be loosened up a bit (at least a 1/4 to 3/8s of an inch) and allow slack if running low air pressure. If you tighten it up, when the tube slips (especially the front under hard downhill breaking even with rim locks), it will shear the valve stem off of the tube. If it has slack, the stem aligns more with direction of pull and there is more elasticity preventing the shearing.
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Old 04-04-2008, 06:32 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JStrom
Ned, can you elaborate on Point 7? I've never heard of spraying everything with WD-40 (but that ain't saying much)
Sure, it's a good cleaning agent/ solvent that won't hurt anything, it makes it easy to wipe dirt off, and if you're doing other maintenance (like a valve adjust) whatever junk you didn't get off with your thorough cleaning will stick to the WD-40 and not fall in your engine. Hopefully.
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Old 04-04-2008, 09:43 PM   #36
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Old 04-05-2008, 05:38 AM   #37
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Thanks, Ned.
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Old 04-05-2008, 06:03 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HellSickle
I differ on my prefernce for cable lube. I use a light silicone oil or TriFlow with a power luber every spring.
Most, if not all, moden cables come with a built in teflon liner and are designed to be run dry.
Any kind of lube just attracts and retains dirt/dust/grit, which prematurely wears the teflon liner.

If you're after smoother throttle action, you could try running graphite powder between the handlebar and throttle tube.

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Old 04-05-2008, 07:54 PM   #39
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Thanks for the FYI Antware, I didn't know that about cables.

And Ned, there are some places where WD-40 is not good...
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Old 04-08-2008, 04:34 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neduro
6)
Now is also a good time to install new tires, if you've been putting it off. I know those knobs have 1/8" of hardened, rounded old rubber left, but believe me, it'll work a lot better with the full 3/8" and sharp edges to boot. KLR guys, you listening?
I am so guilty of this.
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Old 04-09-2008, 10:40 PM   #41
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You da man, Ned

Thanks!

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Old 04-10-2008, 02:05 AM   #42
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Thanx, Ned!
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Old 04-10-2008, 05:29 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neduro
Get your bearings and seals from an industrial bearing supply place, unless you like paying 5x the normal cost.
Any suggestions on "industrial bearing supply" houses to use? How do you talk to these people? Is there some way to translate motorcycle part numbers to their part numbers?

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Old 04-10-2008, 09:41 PM   #44
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+1 for anti seize esp. swing arm axel adjusters.... pull all the way out. I had about a gallon in mine once.
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Old 04-11-2008, 01:14 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Disquisitive Dave
Any suggestions on "industrial bearing supply" houses to use? How do you talk to these people? Is there some way to translate motorcycle part numbers to their part numbers?

Don't know about supply houses in your area but most can go off numbers on the bearings themselves or dimensions.

The yellow pages and Vernier calipers are your friends.
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