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Old 03-26-2008, 07:40 PM   #1
bonox OP
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how does a 2 pin flasher relay work?

I can't find a spec sheet for a generic one.

Do they go in series or parallel with the load?
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Old 03-26-2008, 07:48 PM   #2
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Connect in series with the common power or common ground of the turn signal circuit. Pass either the common filament ground, or the common filament power through it. A bimetallic metal strip heats up when current flows and 'springs' the contact open, when it cools the contact closes again.

It flashes (cycles) quicker, or not at all, when a bulb is burned out because the lower current heats the bimetallic metal strip less. And it either cools quicker and cycles faster, or doesn't heat up enough to open the circuit and the lights stay on constant until the turn signal switch is returned to center.

The signal bulbs, left pair and right pair, are connected in parallel.


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Poolside screwed with this post 03-26-2008 at 07:55 PM
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Old 03-26-2008, 07:50 PM   #3
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the 2 pin variety would be in series.. on the power side ,with the L-R switch controlling the ground switching
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Old 03-26-2008, 08:14 PM   #4
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thanks fellas
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Old 03-27-2008, 07:57 AM   #5
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There is also a solid state model that will flash the same no matter what the load.
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Old 03-27-2008, 02:20 PM   #6
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i'm just making a 2 lamp alternate flasher for dad - the train buff has bought himself a level crossing sign (lamps and bell) and wants it wired up. I thought the cheapest way was a car flasher can and a relay. Thanks for the help - but cheap and easy is the go here - not sure the solid state ones are worth the cost.
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Old 03-28-2008, 05:05 PM   #7
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For a low load you can use the bimetal cheapie and figure our what resistor will give you the proper load to make it flash.
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Old 03-28-2008, 05:20 PM   #8
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I'd just wire in an 1157 bulb, and tape it up and hide it somewhere so you couldn't see it. You have 2 filaments of different resistance so you could find a combination that gives you the blink rate you need.
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Old 03-30-2008, 06:06 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreaseMonkey
I'd just wire in an 1157 bulb, and tape it up and hide it somewhere so you couldn't see it. You have 2 filaments of different resistance so you could find a combination that gives you the blink rate you need.
I'd much sooner go with a resistor. A bulb is relatively fragile, but a resistor will give you tons of life. If you want to get fancy, install a variable resistor in-line and you will be able to control the flash rate.
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Old 03-30-2008, 10:48 AM   #10
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Personally, if this were for me I'd go with a 555 timer.

But it is not for you or I, it is for someone else building something for his dad who wants cheap and simple. If he uses a resistor instead of a bulb, now he has to find yet another store in addition to an auto parts place where he could buy both items at once. Additionally, if he wants or needs the crossing flashers to alternate the simplest way is with a bosch style relay, also available at the same place.

I would not have any longevity concerns either, considering this will a bulb in a non-vibratory environment seeing intermittent use.
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Old 05-20-2008, 08:07 PM   #11
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Well...

A bulb has a lot of drawbacks. It is fragile by nature. It sits in a socket that is prone to corrosion. The filaments are always at the mercy of production tolerances, shipping, and handling. Vibration is always an issue. They also have heat issues if they're mounted inside or near anything that's prone to melt.

A resistor can be had ANYWHERE. Go to the local radio shack and take your pick; plus, putting a variable resistor/or rheostat in circuit will give you the ability to customize flash rate so it will be appropriate to the use.

A clocking circuit will be more expensive, but will be more compact and use less energy since you're not compensating for the resistive filament with a resistor; you're just using pulses. Reliability will suffer over a resistor unless you get one that is made to work in a high exposure/high vibration environment (which should be pretty easy to find).

Being simple to build is one thing; being simple to maintain and keep operational is something else entirely. A bit of time invested now will have a huge impact later.
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Old 05-20-2008, 08:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny KLR
Being simple to build is one thing; being simple to maintain and keep operational is something else entirely. A bit of time invested now will have a huge impact later.
Thanks for your concern, however KLR owners should be well aware of the "just replace the component" principle


A 2pin car flasher can has been powering a pair of 25W lamps for nearly 2 months now. If it breaks, he can just plug in a new flasher can or relay.
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