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Old 04-07-2008, 12:52 PM   #16
cpmodem
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Be sure to pop the sparkplug tubes out before R&Ring the cam bridge bolts. It restricts access to the two of the bolts. Could cause a problem.
Just sayin'

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Old 04-07-2008, 03:26 PM   #17
Hair OP
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I will probbly try an easy out. I don't like the thought of drilling in there.
The bolt that I had issues with was the 8M. It would be in the upper left corner of your photo.
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Old 04-07-2008, 03:33 PM   #18
cpmodem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hair
I will probbly try an easy out. I don't like the thought of drilling in there.
The bolt that I had issues with was the 8M. It would be in the upper left corner of your photo.
Yeh, I wouldn't wanna drill in there either unless it was the last resort. I was hoping one of the EZ-Outs would fit in the stripped out hole without drillin' (maybe just wishful thinkin') I suppose you've already tried a pair of Vicegrips.
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Old 04-09-2008, 10:08 AM   #19
Stephen
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Similar experience here. First I've been in there, only factory and perhaps -- perhaps -- dealer's fella went first. First bolt I touched, I could feel the wrench failing to seat. Looked close, only minor mushing, so I rapped it with something hard and heavy. But that bolt, and indeed, the rest of them, felt real sticky.

I'm getting some new bolts, and I'm putting anti-seize on'em, as I always do on dissimilar metals. This was scary for sure.
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Old 04-09-2008, 10:54 AM   #20
Hair OP
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Our friends at BMW have concerns about using anti-seize on torqued bolts. Their concern is that any lubricant that is applied could mess-up the torque values.

I guess that inner thread friction affects torque values.
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Old 04-09-2008, 11:47 AM   #21
uk_mouse
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hair
I guess that inner thread friction affects torque values.
It does, but in this application I thi nk you'd be hard pressed to get the bolts in without getting some engine oil on them. When I've removed my cam bridges I always put a light coating of engine oil on the bolt threads before reinstallation, and it doesn't seem to have done any harm yet!

I'd be wary about putting anti-seize on a bolt that's inside the engine, although I admit it's unlikely to do any harm.
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Old 04-09-2008, 12:49 PM   #22
jsrider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uk_mouse
I'd be wary about putting anti-seize on a bolt that's inside the engine, although I admit it's unlikely to do any harm.
FWIW the cylinder head nut TSB from KTM recommended using anti-seize. Two of the cylinder heat bolts are under the valve covers.
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Old 04-09-2008, 03:58 PM   #23
emelgee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hair
Our friends at BMW have concerns about using anti-seize on torqued bolts. Their concern is that any lubricant that is applied could mess-up the torque values.

I guess that inner thread friction affects torque values.
As far as I recall the BMW issue was related to rear wheel nuts. There were a couple of instances in the UK of wheels coming loose while the bike was being ridden
I don't remember if this was caused by the bolts coming loose due to the anti-sieze, or if lubricating the threads caused them to be overtightened and then shearing...
As far as cam bolts are concerned I just put a drop of engine oil on the thread - no problems with them coming loose, or siezing in place.
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Old 04-09-2008, 04:12 PM   #24
Stephen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hair
Our friends at BMW have concerns about using anti-seize on torqued bolts. Their concern is that any lubricant that is applied could mess-up the torque values.

I guess that inner thread friction affects torque values.
We measure torque as an analog of fastener stretch. We want to stretch the fastener sufficiently to ensure a certain level of tightness of the fastened parts. Anything like thread friction increases the perceived tightness of the fastener without increasing the tightness of the joint. In other words, we want it all slick as snot so the torque wrench only measures stretch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by emelgee
As far as I recall the BMW issue was related to rear wheel nuts...
The cone washers, actually. Any tapers, generally, go unlubed. I've seen folks split auto brake hubs...

And yeah, I can't imagine that the cam bridge bolts could be dry. They were certainly oily by the time I got'em out, and I'm sure I can't replace them with getting oil on'em. But it sure felt like galvanic stickiness tryin' to break'em free. Nuthin nuthin nuthin.. bang!

Anti-seize will prevent reoccurence.
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Old 04-09-2008, 05:24 PM   #25
madrid mark
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Good thread. Hair,i hope to see you sat.
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Old 04-10-2008, 09:24 AM   #26
ceeco
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Maybe KTM changed the bolt spec.?? I cant see how this issue would be so random either. Maybe we should ba asking a few more questions.... like year model.

I'll start by confirming that my and a friends 04' has had the cam bolts removed multiple times w/o issue. We lubed the bolts on install with motor oil and torqued to spec using torque wrench (using steped torquing described in manual).
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Old 04-10-2008, 09:47 AM   #27
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These particular capscrews are a low head height spec. They have about 35/40% less engagement depth in the hex socket vs. a standard height socket head capscrew. This was done because of the tight space reqmts in this head design, for better or worse.
Suggest always use motor oil to lube the threads, torque to spec (more is not better), and use a bit in new or as-new condition.
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Old 04-10-2008, 10:39 AM   #28
emelgee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ceeco
Maybe KTM changed the bolt spec.?? I cant see how this issue would be so random either. Maybe we should ba asking a few more questions.... like year model.
There's quite a few riders on here who do all their own maintenance work (myself included) and this is the first time this subject has cropped up in the couple of years of been posting here. Sounds like a few isolated instances of overtightening, rather than a general problem.
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Old 04-11-2008, 02:20 AM   #29
uk_mouse
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I've never had problems removing those bolts on my bike, I've only ever used engine oil on the threads. For what it's worth.
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Old 10-17-2013, 11:40 AM   #30
BigTony
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Whew...

I'm going to resurrect and oldie here...found this thread while searching for tips on a problem

So I actually did manage to strip one of these cam bridge bolts. They were torqued correctly last time but I'm wondering about my torque wrench calibration at this point. I think it was more a problem of my hex bit not fitting entirely square due to tight access and maybe my XXXL mitts and too much force have something to do with it.

Anyway, I spun my craftsman hex socket attachment in the screw, then tried a T30 torx bit with a ratchet handle and eventually spun that too.

After regrouping overnight, I realized I could get a straight shot at the bolt if I removed the rear fender, so did that, and then my Dad came to the rescue with tools - we managed to get a little bit of grip in the bit with the better angle, and we first tried a makita battery powered impact wrench, which didn't have enough force to turn the bolt, and then we tried my new favorite tool:

Something like THIS:

http://toolmonger.com/2009/07/30/imp...impact-driver/
Basically you whack this thing with a hammer and the force of the blow pushes the bit while rotating it, to knock the bolt loose.

Honestly I was having visions of having to drill out the bolt, etc and this tool saved me - three whacks with a dead blow hammer and I managed to break the bolt loose.

Plus in the spirit of Top Gear Jeremy Clarkson this adds one more use for the all-mighty hammer - loosening bolts!

The threads on the bold looked good, so honestly no idea why it bound so hard but all is good now, and it was kinda fun that my dad saved the day with the old school man-tools...

Word to the wise - if you do a lot of valve checks like me and/or see any rounding just buy new bolts (they're not expensive)
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