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Old 12-26-2011, 05:47 PM   #31
supershaft
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The races do get notched just like steering head bearing races. I would guess within 5000 miles. I have replaced tons of them under warranty.
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Old 12-26-2011, 05:58 PM   #32
jackd
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These bearings are still being applied to the later model GS's - my guess is the oilheads. They are being described in the BMW fiche as a one time use item. I've replaced some of mine and found the outer races to be notched others not notched at all. The cage is usually what lets go, this has been my experience. Anyway, throwing in the guts of a new bearing will get you home.
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Old 12-26-2011, 06:23 PM   #33
supershaft
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I never stopped to see if I could tell where they are notching. A notched bearing is a notched bearing to me. I replace them when they are notched. I feel for a notch while the shock is off. I was usually there to start with for a leaking FD input seal.
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Old 12-26-2011, 06:38 PM   #34
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Question: how hard are those imput seals to change?
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Old 12-27-2011, 09:52 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beemerboff View Post
The GS - G/S debate will never end , but folks that have both seem to favour their GS.
Not me for one... I much prefer my G/S as an over-all bike with GS being a better street bike when two-up. I'd bet if you asked those who own both and prefer the GS how much street riding they do, it would be a very high percent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beemerboff View Post
I dont notice any weight difference, which seems to be the main claimed advantage for the G/S, but I do notice the better forks, brakes, power, suspension, seat, and overall package.
If there is any additional weight in a GS it is in components that are simply not up to the job on the G/S.
I find the weight diference to be very evident, the G/S is much easier to ride in rough stuff off-road. The G/S forks (or mine at any rate) are very nearly equal to my old GS that had braces, gold valves and custom springs... the brakes with the 320mm rotor are great, the seat is equal at worst, the G/S solo is much better than the GS solo IMHO

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beemerboff View Post
The paralever is simply a better system, there is more to it than anti jacking.
Once dialed in, my rear shock minimize shaft jacking to almost nothing, and as noted the mono has less moving bits, less failure points and less service points. On my GS I had to replace the u-joints, shaft damping material as well as the para pivot bearings.... On the G/S you just ride.

[/QUOTE]
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagehand
your bike is suitably dirty. Well done.
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Old 12-27-2011, 10:06 AM   #36
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I did south America two up on a R80 back in 82.

I would use the most strongly constructed rear shock that you can find, steel body rather than alloy, I doubt if you will spend much time over 60mph and even though many of the dirt roads have now been upgraded, I would reckon that road surfaces involve lots of bumps and potholes. The racks for your panniers will take a hammering, but can usually be welded up.

If you are going to spend much time on the Altiplano in Peru and Bolivia, think about taking some smaller jets, you are going to lose lots of power at 13,000 ft, but leaning out the mixture will help.

Smile going through those border crossings and speaking some Spanish will really help. I don't know if a carnet de passages customs document is still needed?

Charles
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Old 12-27-2011, 11:13 AM   #37
H96669
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackd View Post
Question: how hard are those imput seals to change?
First you need this:



From there, "Not" Canadian Tire, theirs won't fit unless you machine it:



A few more "not so special" tools, lots of heat and reading 3-4 manuals:






Gets you there, where you can inspect everything then replace BOTH the compression sleeve and the seal, mostly the problem with mine that wear on the compression sleeve, and most probably from the bad driveshaft:



Total cost with tools/parts.....35% of what I paid last year at xxxx in Vancouver.
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Old 12-27-2011, 11:35 AM   #38
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Thanks for the response H96669! I haven't had the need to do mine yet - I actually have a spare final drive ready to go if the need arises. I'll save your pics for future reference. Here's another big thank you for all your contributions to the forum - it's nice to see another BC'er throwing their knowledge into the mix.
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Old 12-27-2011, 05:04 PM   #39
supershaft
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The trick is getting the FD rigid to tighten down the input nut. That is pretty much how I do it. I agree about the compression ring. The seal very often wears it out. I think that oil is leaking past the collar's threads more often than past the seal. I have been around around a lot of people trying a lot of things there. Super clean and teflon liquid pipe tape works by far the best in my experience.
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Old 12-28-2011, 08:13 AM   #40
H96669
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Anyone interested in replacing that seal, the crenellated socket cannot be more than 65mm. Because they are used on Dana Axles with plenty of outside clearances it is pretty hard to get the right one for O.D. and most of the online suppliers won't give the O.D.Specs.

The one I am showing is 60mm but I have another one that came at 67 something and I had to machine it down to 65mm.

The cover seems to come out pretty well leaving the "brake shaft pipe" in place instead of pushing it out as per the manual. Just heat around the pipe and slide right off.

Not much in my older Clymer on disassembly of the rear drive, no pics really of the jigs or tools but way much more on that in the Clymer for the K1200RS.Gotta wonder why... Just practising on the GS until I have to open up one of them.

Lots of heat required, way more than the recommendation in the manuals so I got the torch out, insulated the seal with some stove gasket and went at it. First time it did not release....more heat and everything came out easily, that is with a GS fork tube over grandpa's old Gray Canada breaker's bar.

I haven't put it back together yet but someone did that on a K and the big nut came loose shortly after.... His answer to that, and maybe mine too, was to buy one of them 12V digital impact drivers used for car wheels, they have a built in "torque meter" . He did all the testing already and I'll trust him on that he is one of the better wrenches on the K-bikes forums.

Something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Nocord-Digital.../dp/B0014JL5YQ

Lotsa heat....:



The holding jig is a piece of 2" square tubing, using the wheel bolts with washers so they don't bottom out. The piece of threaded rod, was fine to remove the nuts but did bend a little. Unless I get an impact tool for reassembly I'll have to reinforce that if I want to use the SnapOn Torque Wrench. The welded tab at the end, I just happened to have it like that in the steel pile, but if you drill it and mount the drive on it at the torque arm bushing it comes in very handy when pushing the pinion out.





Nice mess I found in there....and the PO was an aircraft mechanic Ouch!!!

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Old 12-28-2011, 08:17 AM   #41
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Nice mess I found in there....and the PO was an aircraft mechanic Ouch!!!

Means nothing when it comes to skill.....
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Old 12-28-2011, 08:51 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackd View Post
Nice mess I found in there....and the PO was an aircraft mechanic Ouch!!!

Means nothing when it comes to skill.....
Oh he knew....gave me quite the blank look when I tried to show him pivot bearings and educate him a little for his new BMW.Did not line up that swingarm too good either. Good luck to him....I just hope he buys new bearings when needed, not just jam the old ones back in there full of new grease over the old stuff. Retired but fixes UPS planes sometimes under contract.
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:18 AM   #43
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Retired but fixes UPS planes sometimes under contract.
Probably living at the starvation level if he's retired... Maybe he couldn't afford to spring for the new bearings.
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:56 AM   #44
supershaft
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I just read H96669's thread a bit. Don't heat up the FD housing from the inside. Heat it up on the outside. It's the case that needs to expand. Plus you can seriously muff the bearing roller cage or worse doing that. The trick is to not cook the paint on the painted models. The nut itself doesn't need that much heat to break the red loctite bond.
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Old 12-29-2011, 02:23 AM   #45
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just purchased a G/S to avoid all the issues with paralever
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