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Old 06-01-2013, 08:28 PM   #4801
aprilian
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This thread is great! Today the bike wouldn't start so I checked battery, fuses and (due to this thread) I started to dig into the ignition switch. One of the two wires in the ignition switch had overheated and separated from its lug. There was a blob of solder sitting loose in the switch which used to be on the wire. The wire must have been getting hot since it has melted part of the white plastic and the contact pad has receded into the plastic. Therefore I can't just resolder the wire . I don't want to just use a hidden switch since I commute on the bike.

What have others done, just buy a used ignition switch, dismantle and solder the white fixed piece into the existing wires?
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:17 PM   #4802
tbarstow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aprilian View Post
This thread is great! Today the bike wouldn't start so I checked battery, fuses and (due to this thread) I started to dig into the ignition switch. One of the two wires in the ignition switch had overheated and separated from its lug. There was a blob of solder sitting loose in the switch which used to be on the wire. The wire must have been getting hot since it has melted part of the white plastic and the contact pad has receded into the plastic. Therefore I can't just resolder the wire . I don't want to just use a hidden switch since I commute on the bike.

What have others done, just buy a used ignition switch, dismantle and solder the white fixed piece into the existing wires?
The switch didn't overheat, it just had a crap soldering job to begin with. You can resolder it properly and you'll be fine.
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:46 PM   #4803
everycredit
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Sprocket and Chain Replacement Procedure

Since I was searching (and couldn't find) a step-by-step way to change the sprockets and chain, I guess I'll make a contribution to the thread. I didn't take photos, but you won't need visuals.

G650X Chain and Sprocket Replacement Procedure


Tools
  • A method to safely lift the rear of the bike off the ground
  • A second person isn't required, but greatly helps in reinstalling the rear wheel. Also a second person is great for safety reasons.
  • Safety glasses
  • Gloves
  • Angle grinder
  • Impact wrench with 19mm and 27mm bits
  • 8mm and 10mm socket
  • 10mm and 13mm wrenches
  • Chain breaker
  • Chain riveter or needle nose pliers (to attach master link)
  • Torque wrench
  • Large, flat-head screwdriver
  • 12-inch ruler
Parts
  • Front and rear sprocket (16T and 47T, respectively)
  • Chain (520, 112 link)
  • Master link
Skills
  • Ability to safely lift the rear of your motorcycle (jack and jack stands, hoist, center stand, etc)
  • Basic mechanical skills
  • Ability to use all the tools listed above
  • Ability to take measurements to the millimeter
  • Ability to use a torque wrench
  • Knowledge of how to attach a master link to a chain
Procedure
  1. Read through this procedure and familiarize yourself with this DIY. Make sure you possess the skills, tools, parts, and can proceed safely. Only you can judge whether the procedure is safe. You will be lifting a heavy bike in the air, so make sure the bike is secured and will not fall on you while working on the bike. Effort is required to remove certain parts and may cause the bike to shift its weight. Make sure that if it does, it will not fall.
  2. Lift and secure the rear end of the bike so the rear wheel is not touching the ground.
  3. Use the angle grinder to grind off the riveted ends of a link in the chain. Make sure the grinder will not shoot sparks into your face or anything that can cause injury or combustion. Grind the rivets so it is flat against the base of the chain link. OR If you can find the master link and it is attached with a clip, remove the clip with pliers and push the master link out.
  4. Use the chain breaker to remove the pins in the link you just ground down. Remove the chain.
  5. Remove the front sprocket cover using an 8mm socket. Three screws hold the cover to the bike. You will have to press the brake to gain access with a socket. Make sure you do this before removing the wheel as pressing the rear brake with no rotor between the pads can cause damage to your brake calipers.
  6. Using your impact wrench with a 27mm socket, remove the nut on the right side of the bike (i.e., passenger side of a car).
  7. While holding the rear wheel, remove the rear axle by pulling on the axle from the left side.
  8. Remove the rear wheel and keep it standing. Remove the sprocket by pulling it off the wheel--it comes off with the wheel hub. Lay the wheel down on the sprocket side to avoid damaging the brake rotor.
  9. Using a 13mm wrench, secure the nut on the rear of the sprocket and remove the screw with a 10mm socket wrench.
  10. Attach the new sprocket in reverse order of removal in step 9.
  11. Use the flat-head screwdriver and pry open the rear brake to give more room to install the rear wheel. Make sure the brake pads are seated properly before continuing. If a brake pad comes loose, the caliper can be removed without any tools by pulling the caliper toward the midline of the bike. This allows for better viewing to properly seat the brake pads.
  12. Install the rear wheel. It helps if you have someone to help install the rear axle while someone holds the wheel. When installing the rear wheel, insert the rear axle from the left side and thread through the left side of the swing arm and the rear brake caliper to secure in place. Lift the rear wheel in place, making sure the hubs on both sides are flush to the wheel so it will fit and the brake rotor sits between both brake pads. Thread the axle and make sure the flat end of the left axle head (it should look like a letter "D") is facing forward toward the wheel position adjuster/chain tensioner. Thread the axle to the other side and tighten the nut on the right side by hand.
  13. Set the real wheel position/chain tension. I used the large hash mark on both sides. You can loosen the set screw with a 13mm wrench and adjust with a 10mm wrench.
  14. Replace the front sprocket. Make sure the bike is in neutral and use the impact wrench with 19mm socket to remove the nut. I used the impact wrench to tighten the bolt, shifted in first, and used a torque wrench to tighten to 40 Nm.
  15. Install the new chain. You can lube the chain with chain grease as it is easier to do this when the chain is not installed. Shift the bike back into neutral and thread the chain onto both sprockets and bring it back to the rear sprocket. Making sure the chain is taught, insert the master link. If you cannot get the chain ends close enough, you may have to readjust the rear wheel position and move the rear wheel forward.
  16. Insert the master link and secure by rivets or clip, depending on the link type. If using a clip, make sure the clip is oriented that the closed end is going forward to direction of travel of the chain.
  17. Check the chain play. Using a ruler, mark the position of the chain at rest. Use your screwdriver to lift the chain. There should be 25mm - 30mm of play. Adjust the rear wheel position as necessary to meet this specification.
  18. Tighten the rear wheel nut.
  19. Reinstall the front sprocket cover.
  20. Pump the rear brake so the pads make contact with the rotor.
  21. Inspect all fastenings and recheck chain play.
  22. Go for a ride.
  23. Reinspect chain play. Adjust as necessary.
I hope this helps. Feel free to add steps or correct me where I am wrong. Also, if you have torque specifications, I can add them here.

everycredit screwed with this post 06-01-2013 at 10:56 PM
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Old 06-02-2013, 01:16 PM   #4804
tbarstow
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Number 14 is incorrect:

14. Replace the front sprocket. Make sure the bike is in neutral and use the impact wrench with 19mm socket to remove the nut. I used the impact wrench to tighten the bolt, shifted in first, and used a torque wrench to tighten to 40 Nm.

To remove and replace the front sprocket, this should be step #2:

With the bike in neutral, depress the rear brake and hold it while you use a 19mm socket on a breaker bar to loosen the bolt holding the front sprocket.

Then proceed with removing the old master link clip (or grinding the rivet head), remove the chain, replace the front sprocket, hand tighten the front sprocket bolt, remove the rear wheel, replace the rear sprocket, replace the rear wheel, feed the new chain, install the master link, depress the rear brake and torque the front sprocket bolt, check the rear wheel alignment and chain slack, then tighten everything down.

Proceed to ride it like you stole it.
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Old 06-02-2013, 01:39 PM   #4805
Antti
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Thanks an13, pampax and butters.
I'm still considering 8cell to get some space for accessories. Bike has PCV+Autotune, Pro-oiler (junction box) and extra wiring harnes with relays feeding aux lighs, heated grips, gps and so. So theres very tight under plastics right now.
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Old 06-02-2013, 04:09 PM   #4806
everycredit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbarstow View Post
Number 14 is incorrect:

14. Replace the front sprocket. Make sure the bike is in neutral and use the impact wrench with 19mm socket to remove the nut. I used the impact wrench to tighten the bolt, shifted in first, and used a torque wrench to tighten to 40 Nm.

To remove and replace the front sprocket, this should be step #2:

With the bike in neutral, depress the rear brake and hold it while you use a 19mm socket on a breaker bar to loosen the bolt holding the front sprocket.

Then proceed with removing the old master link clip (or grinding the rivet head), remove the chain, replace the front sprocket, hand tighten the front sprocket bolt, remove the rear wheel, replace the rear sprocket, replace the rear wheel, feed the new chain, install the master link, depress the rear brake and torque the front sprocket bolt, check the rear wheel alignment and chain slack, then tighten everything down.

Proceed to ride it like you stole it.
Impact wrench no good on front sprocket? Was I lucky not to fuck up my engine?
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Old 06-02-2013, 07:30 PM   #4807
tbarstow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by everycredit View Post
Impact wrench no good on front sprocket? Was I lucky not to fuck up my engine?
Correct. You probably didn't fuck up your engine this time. Think about it, the impact wrench is punching your transmission and making your engine go backwards.
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:10 PM   #4808
everycredit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbarstow View Post
Correct. You probably didn't fuck up your engine this time. Think about it, the impact wrench is punching your transmission and making your engine go backwards.
Actually, my engine started twice. Oh well. :)
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Old 06-03-2013, 08:18 AM   #4809
aprilian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbarstow View Post
The switch didn't overheat, it just had a crap soldering job to begin with. You can resolder it properly and you'll be fine.
Resoldering not an option (see #2 below).

The switch did overheat.
1) locally overheated white plastic turned brown
2) melted plastic allowed contact to recede into white plastic - will no longer make contact
4) green wire was clearly soldered as the orange still is. however the solder was loose in a ball when I opened the switch
5) melted insulation on green wire

It is a poor/cheap design. All 30A of battery juice go through that pair of contacts - some bikes use relays.

I am looking for a cheap Zado ignition switch (Aprilia uses them) since the design inside lets me think that the single white plastic disc (with embedded contacts) is universal to their design and they only change how many of the contacts they wire up. Many of the pictures of the externals for Aprilia scooters are a match to the externals we have.

Stay tuned...
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:06 PM   #4810
andmoon
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rear shock

Hi folks.

We have an xchallenge at work that I want to ride but the rear shock won't hold pressure.

What is the lowest cost replacement shock available for this bike?

Thanks.
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:53 PM   #4811
Butters
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You could buy a used airshock, probably about $100. Heck, I'll sell you mine if you get in a pinch.

An X-Country shock will work too for cheap, but I think it will lower the bike some.

The cheapest new shock may be a Hagon shock, but it probably would have to be imported. Maybe $350-400?

A good value would be a Hyperpro 460 at about $600. The dealer is located in Jersey. I am extremely happy with mine.

Prices go up from their for higher end Hyperpro or Ohlins. I don't think Wilbers is available anymore.
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:04 PM   #4812
Sno Dawg
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Location: Philadelphia, PA
Oddometer: 755
selling my Remus slip on

I picked up this Remus slip on in a trade and have realized that I will not be using it on my XChallenge and I need the $.

The exhaust is from a full Remus exhaust system, but I have been told it will slip on the stock exhaust and it might need a gasket ~ $15. I have never had it on my bike so I am not sure how it sounds.

I would like to get about $235 shipped OBO for it or interesting trades.

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=892686

Sno Dawg - Jeff
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:10 AM   #4813
snooker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Butters View Post
I actually went with an EarthX-18. The cca and Ah values are kind of like comparing apples and oranges. Especially in Finland, the Li battery is going to have reduced cca in the cold. Likely it will be fine once you warm it up (headlight on for a few seconds or a crank or two). But I would err on the side of extra cca. I had no loss in cranking performance even at freezing temps.

The Ah values are also "Pb-acid equivalent", not true Ah. Unless you plan on using the extra space in your battery compartment for something, I would go as big as possible. The difference between an 8, 12, or even 18 or 24 is only ounces with Lithium batteries. Regardless which Li battery you get, it will be several pounds lighter than the stock battery, even if it has the same dimensions.

Or the short answer - I would definitely get at least the 12 cell.

Here's a link to pics of my install: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...postcount=4379
I believe the CCA specs from EarthX are real and follow the SAE spec for their CCA measurement, unlike other certain other companies, this is what I've learned. Also, just in the last 2 months, EarthX has added a protection circuit for the number one reason that LiFePO4 batteries fail, and that is overdischarging - meaning too much draw and the voltage drops too low and can permanently damage Lithiums. They have a new overdischarge protection circuit.

I would get the ETX18B, plus it fits like a glove.
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:14 AM   #4814
snooker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Butters View Post
You could buy a used airshock, probably about $100. Heck, I'll sell you mine if you get in a pinch.

An X-Country shock will work too for cheap, but I think it will lower the bike some.

The cheapest new shock may be a Hagon shock, but it probably would have to be imported. Maybe $350-400?

A good value would be a Hyperpro 460 at about $600. The dealer is located in Jersey. I am extremely happy with mine.

Prices go up from their for higher end Hyperpro or Ohlins. I don't think Wilbers is available anymore.
Also Yacugar, similar to Hyperpro (same components). I have one and it has been great - and my Wilbers never dampened correctly ever, with 3 different springs on it. But not cheap.
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Old 06-06-2013, 06:54 PM   #4815
jack splash
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Forks

Hey: Any one got a set of used stock forks and or triple clamps they want to sell?

please email me at jack-bsm@comcast.net.

Thanks
jack
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