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Old 05-19-2008, 01:38 AM   #1
bluesman OP
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Question Seeking advices on riding heavy bike offroad

It's time I am about to drag myself to some level in light offroading with my DR800. I am seeking advice from people, who know how to ride really good on heavy dualsport on loose surfaces. So far I managed to keep falling numerous times and getting a bit tired (and sore:)) so I know I do things wrong.
I have biig experience onroad, good 15 years of fast or at least enthusiastic riding on tarmac on different bikes, mostly sportbikes. And I think that affects my offroad attempts in a negative way.
So, conditions:
1. One Suzuki DR800, mildly tuned, dry weight about 180 kg, VERY high seat, semi-knobby tires (Mefo Explorer). For more info - DR800 is a thumper, old skool (AT, Supertenere times) but more offroad oriented than AT and Superten and does not mind being dropped.
2. One rider, about 80 kg of weight, strong enough to pick up the pig when it falling over. But I am short - 5.6. I can touch ground with my toes when on the bike.

Apart from typical paved roads rider mistake of grabbing front brake instead of using rear first I seem to be totally unable to do that cool drift/slide thing, I just automatically keep on trying to minimize slides and drifts as soon as I hit loose surface. As result I am going really slow.

Please, share your wisdom - how it should be done, any useful advice will be appreaciated!

And yes, on May 26 I am going to attend 1-day crash course on riding heavy dualsports offroad, but that course is kinda safety oriented, so will not teach me all I need to know.
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Old 05-19-2008, 03:44 AM   #2
JDLuke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesman
It's time I am about to drag myself to some level in light offroading with my DR800. I am seeking advice from people, who know how to ride really good on heavy dualsport on loose surfaces. So far I managed to keep falling numerous times and getting a bit tired (and sore:)) so I know I do things wrong.
I have biig experience onroad, good 15 years of fast or at least enthusiastic riding on tarmac on different bikes, mostly sportbikes. And I think that affects my offroad attempts in a negative way.
So, conditions:
1. One Suzuki DR800, mildly tuned, dry weight about 180 kg, VERY high seat, semi-knobby tires (Mefo Explorer). For more info - DR800 is a thumper, old skool (AT, Supertenere times) but more offroad oriented than AT and Superten and does not mind being dropped.
2. One rider, about 80 kg of weight, strong enough to pick up the pig when it falling over. But I am short - 5.6. I can touch ground with my toes when on the bike.

Apart from typical paved roads rider mistake of grabbing front brake instead of using rear first I seem to be totally unable to do that cool drift/slide thing, I just automatically keep on trying to minimize slides and drifts as soon as I hit loose surface. As result I am going really slow.

Please, share your wisdom - how it should be done, any useful advice will be appreaciated!

And yes, on May 26 I am going to attend 1-day crash course on riding heavy dualsports offroad, but that course is kinda safety oriented, so will not teach me all I need to know.
Here's what you need to know about riding a heavy dual-sport MX-style:

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Old 05-19-2008, 04:39 AM   #3
bluesman OP
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I realize that...I am riding in Sidi Crossfires (with my height it covers my leg up to the knee) and full armour, I actually do same on road bikes. I know it will not save me from injuries, but perhaps it is better that usual gear.
I do not want to ride really MX style, but at least faster than turtle on prozac will be fine :)
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Old 05-19-2008, 07:01 AM   #4
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Yeah, I got that through BMW Rallye Pro 2 Pants and MX-style boots. Glad I was wearing them! The bruising didn't even show for about two days after the impact. Fortunately there were no broken bones, and more importantly, the bike was still OK (with the exception of a broken-off auxiiliary lamp and turn signal).

Actually, the only reason I went off that day was that I was beginning to get a little bit faster and more confident... You can see where that led me!

The Mefo Explorers are a good choice, I think. Theyr'e what I have mounted right now on the 650GS and traction has so far been very good in all conditions I've tried.
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Why did I drink all of the ingredients for vomit?
"Used to be Man vs. Nature.. then Man vs. Space.. then Man vs. the Moon. Now it's Man vs. Food" - Dalar
"you cannot reason a person out of something they were not reasoned into." - Jonathan Swift
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Old 05-19-2008, 10:39 AM   #5
viola-tor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDLuke
Here's what you need to know about riding a heavy dual-sport MX-style:

is there supposed to be a picture here? I don't see it... From the text I guessing a leg wound from a tip over?

Anyway, I'm wanting to get in on the "big twin enduro" thing too, coming from a sport-touring background, so I'm having similar issues. I want to learn the drifty-slide thing too! I don't want to ride MX style necessarily, but I want to be able to handle *most* situations that would come up in adventure travel, and I'd like to have the higher-speed dirt confidence as a bonus.

Seems like many suggest getting a smaller dual-sport or dirt bike and learn fundamentals, but I can't really afford/keep up with owning mulitple motorcycles, and I really only want to gain experience on my travel bike.

I want to do the Jimmy Lewis clinic, or Rawhyde, but I don't have the time/money/bike for that right now, mb in the fall.
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Old 05-19-2008, 10:58 AM   #6
JDLuke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by viola-tor
is there supposed to be a picture here? I don't see it... From the text I guessing a leg wound from a tip over?
D'oh, sorry it's not coming through for you, I'm using 'Blogger' which lets me email from my cell phone for quick and dirty pictures... I guess it doesn't always work right. Here's a link that should work for pretty much anybody, I think:

And yes, leg damage from a fall from up on an embankment. I took a bad line through a turn, and what was to the left of me was preferable to what was ahead.

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Why did I drink all of the ingredients for vomit?
"Used to be Man vs. Nature.. then Man vs. Space.. then Man vs. the Moon. Now it's Man vs. Food" - Dalar
"you cannot reason a person out of something they were not reasoned into." - Jonathan Swift
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Old 05-19-2008, 12:01 PM   #7
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http://www.dualsportriding.com/

This'll help.
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Old 05-19-2008, 01:11 PM   #8
bluesman OP
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wow - thanks a lot! That DVD is certainly what I was looking for...always seem to be easy to find mx or sportbike learning info, but that's first time I see dualsport one..thanks again!
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Old 05-19-2008, 07:05 PM   #9
viola-tor
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Originally Posted by Bad Company
Oh, yeah, somehow I forgot to mention that! I bought the DVD about a month ago and have watched it probably 10 times. It's great, I wish it was longer! After watching it you def WON'T want a KTM. All I can think about is orange, orange, orange...

I also just bought a book, I'm about halfway through it: Pro Motocross and Off-road Riding Techniques by Donnie Bales with Gary Semics. It's pretty good and lots of shiny pics if you cain't read so good... It's mostly motocross, but there are sections for trail riding too.

Now I need a bike and some time! My time is coming...
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