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Old 07-16-2012, 08:36 PM   #61
zDollar Bill
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Went for a ride in the heat with some old friends yesterday. They like to stop a lot, for beer and drinks. I didn't know that this was how they ride until the first stop was 12 miles. So I had soda and n/a beer, something I don't frequently drink, just like water. Got a couple of questions about my gear looking hot. I was fine, they had no gear, black shirts and vests, in the sun. We went all of 80 miles in about 5 1/2 hours, that was with 4 stops. I guess this is how some others do it in the heat.
I did get to visit with them, but I don't think I can do this again unless I lead and see if they can keep up.
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Old 07-17-2012, 05:10 AM   #62
bridwell52
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Every one thinks here in Florida we ride all year. During July and August the only time I can stand it is early morning and be home before 9:00 am. I ride with gear but honestly think that the pirates are not any cooler with their doo rag helmets and T-shirts.
YMMV
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Old 07-17-2012, 06:51 AM   #63
Mambo Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bridwell52 View Post
Every one thinks here in Florida we ride all year. During July and August the only time I can stand it is early morning and be home before 9:00 am. I ride with gear but honestly think that the pirates are not any cooler with their doo rag helmets and T-shirts.
YMMV
Down here in south Florida we (i.e. me) do ride all year.

I dunno, maybe the pan-handle is hotter?

Actually, as a commuter I've seen different groups.

- The typical weekend / night riders who may be going to bars, always trying to look cool.
- The fair-weather / and daylight-only riders (I'll categorize them as the same group even though I realize some don't)
and the strangest, because I commute a LOT and see most every bike out there multiple times
- The bikes / riders I only see on the coldest days of the year. These guys... I don't know what it is, but all I can imagine is that it's, yet again, the coolness factor in riding in to work on the coldest days of the year. Those same riders and bikes aren't out there if it's cold and raining, or raining, or... any other time... but frosty cold? Now I see them. Only on the coldest days ... I'm serious.

I commute and have to commute by bike to make it worth it, so I've been out there on a bike since early 2011, every frickin' day I had to work, so believe me... I tally up the riders and the momma's boys, the pirates and the guys just passing through. Still nice to see any of them out there, save for the vomit-inducing Can Am trikes, 'cause I like to have company and see bikes. But some people's lives seem to be driven around "hey, look at me" way too much.
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Mambo Dave screwed with this post 07-19-2012 at 08:24 AM
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:36 AM   #64
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My first +100F ride yesterday

Try wetting a t-shirt and closing the vents on your gear: It was 101 F degrees yesterday in Minneapolis. I wore my full-face helmet, textile/ leather jacket, jeans, boots and short leather gloves. I wear UnderArmor t-shirts and underwear in the summer to wick moisture and keep me cool, so before I left work I put my t-shirt in the sink and rung the excess water out after it was good and soaked. I put on all my gear and CLOSED the vents! I was actually very comfortable. I arrived at my destination without sweating up a storm and my t-shirt was almost dry. I rode about 30 minutes in rush hour traffic and was surprised how comfortable it was. The lower legs do get very hot at that temp with the hot air and the hot engine underneath, but not unbearable. Try wetting your t-shirt and closing the vents to keep the hot air out. Also, I drink a bottle of water before I leave my departure point and after I arrive at my destination.
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:42 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by crofrog View Post
Gatorade is shit...

Look at Hammer Nutritions ENDUROLYTES, Vitalyte (use to be gookinaid), or GU Brew, and they're all powders so just throw a few in your tankbag and dump them in a water bottle when needed.

You should be able to find any of those at a good local bike store. I really like the Hammer products but they all work about the same.
Coconut water for me! You want to get the all-natural stuff (not concentrate) or even better, get an actual green coconut if you can. The taste is a bit nasty when it's warm, but now I love the stuff when it's chilled icy-cold for hot weather activity
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Old 07-17-2012, 11:01 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beemer boy View Post
One small tip. I know this will cause some mental anguish for the coffee drinking riders, but I must get it off my chest. On long hot rides I avoid coffee in the morning. Coffee is in fact a diuretic,
causing you to lose water when you need it the most. As was said earlier, you almost need to force yourself to drink water at rest stops. By the time you feel thirsty, you are already into the early stages of dehydration.
Actually, this is from the Mayo Clinic website ,
"Researchers used to believe that caffeinated drinks had a diuretic effect. This means that you would urinate more after drinking them, which could increase your risk of becoming dehydrated. Recent research shows that this is not true and that caffeine has a diuretic effect only if you consume large amounts of it — more than 500 to 600 milligrams (the equivalent of 5 to 7 cups of coffee) a day.

Still, caffeinated drinks can make you jittery, sleepless or anxious. Water is probably your best bet to stay hydrated. It's calorie-free, caffeine-free, inexpensive and readily available."

So don't worry about that 2nd and 3rd cup, you're just hydrating!

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Old 07-17-2012, 11:36 AM   #67
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Staying cool in this heat.

Above 100F, I generally get the lining of my helmet wet by pouring water into it from the sink.Get the lining really wet. That way it runs down my neck and body as I ride. Works pretty well under the leathers, so long as I can keep moving.
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Old 07-17-2012, 11:49 AM   #68
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I used to have a 40 minute commute from North Scottsdale to East Mesa. My trick for staying cool in the summer was to completely soak my cotton tshitrt before I'd put on my non mesh coat. This made a huge difference in comfort. I also had a 3 liter Camelback that I'd fill before I left work and it would usually be empty within ten minutes of getting him home. With this combo I rode through 5 phoenix summers in relative comfort. I've since moved to Charleston, South Carolina and I can't figure out how to stay a little cooler. With this humidity it seems the only answer is to grind through it until the fall.

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Old 07-17-2012, 12:07 PM   #69
Wuwei
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Quote:
Above 100F, I generally get the lining of my helmet wet by pouring water into it from the sink.Get the lining really wet. That way it runs down my neck and body as I ride. Works pretty well under the leathers, so long as I can keep moving.
This ^^. Keeping your head cool makes a huge difference. I've sometimes wondered about rigging up a small hose to a squeeze bottle of water, so I could give it a squeeze and have it dribble down from the top of my helmet.
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Old 07-17-2012, 12:33 PM   #70
daveinva
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FYI, for those who can tolerate sucralose, I find the low-cal Gatorade to be a really helpful substitute to the full-calorie stuff. All the hydration at a fraction of the sugar
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Old 07-17-2012, 04:19 PM   #71
Wuwei
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FYI, for those who can tolerate sucralose, I find the low-cal Gatorade to be a really helpful substitute to the full-calorie stuff. All the hydration at a fraction of the sugar.
I don't worry about the sugar in Gatorade because I only drink it when I feel heat-related problems coming on. Usually, I can avoid that problem in the first place by drinking plenty of cold water (I think the warm water thing is a myth), and other techniques mentioned on here. But when the "bonk" is coming on Gatorade seems to work well to rejuvenate me, but it's not like I regularly guzzle the stuff. Can't stand the artificial sweeteners anyway--I have gotten terribly sick a few times when I ate some without knowing. Don't know why I have such a bad reaction, but my family can testify. Sugar, no problem.
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Old 07-17-2012, 04:28 PM   #72
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I fill the upper 2 pockets on my mesh jacket with Ice, if real hot I put some in the pants pockets too.
It kind of hurts for the first few minutes of riding, then bliss for about 30 to 50 miles. Repeat.

Wear swimsuit and swim ever chance you get.

Start early. Spend mid day in a library, no one cares if you fall asleep.

On my bicycle, I start as soon as it is light enough to see.

In by 9:30 or 10 at the latest.

Rod
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Old 07-17-2012, 08:33 PM   #73
B.C.Biker
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Tried out one of the Geiger Rigs last summer and am luv'n it. Like it much more than the standard camel back types for drinking and great for recharging an evap vest or wetting a t shirt on the go. Wet gloves are nice too.
Going to try the ice in the pocket trick. Seems obvious, suprised I've never tried it !
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Old 07-19-2012, 08:28 AM   #74
Mambo Dave
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wuwei View Post
This ^^. Keeping your head cool makes a huge difference. I've sometimes wondered about rigging up a small hose to a squeeze bottle of water, so I could give it a squeeze and have it dribble down from the top of my helmet.
I like this idea... it makes a lot of sense for planned long rides in hot weather.

-----------------

Something else comes to mind about keeping our heads cool... how many of you don't have an all-white helmet for summer use? Seems to me that a ton of riders choose darker, even flat-black, helmets... is that a big reason why so many stop riding in the heat?
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Mambo Dave screwed with this post 07-19-2012 at 09:52 AM
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:21 AM   #75
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This past winter I had asked for an underarmour cold gear balaclava. She accidently got me the "heat gear" version. I wound up trying it out this week with the heat index over 100. Its weird to put on a hood when it's so hot out, but I was pleasantly surprised how dry my head stayed.

I also picked up a "chilly pad" from frogg toggs for like $12 @ Walmart. I soaked it in cool water and it managed to keep the heat bearable, lasted about one hour at speed. I figured it also made for a good reminder when to stop and rehydrate. I can definitely see a cooling vest in my future.
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