ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > Parallel Universe
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-06-2008, 05:39 AM   #46
JRWooden
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: The great state of confusion
Oddometer: 4,112
do-it-yourself maint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert Dave
Regarding the original posters concern, I to am a bit leary of buying a BMW just because of the companys attitude of keeping you reliant on a dealer for every little thing. yes, you can do your own work, which I intend to, but after a fair amount of research and reading first hand reports from owners it seems I'll have an uphill battle. ....
DD:
I am a do-it-yourselfer also, and have my money down on a BMW with some trepidation....

In the old days of carburetors & points & plugs a handy rider with a decent tool roll could usually figure out how to make his/her way home .... Now with fuel injection being far more popular, and solid state electronic ignition being pretty much universal it is easier to be left stranded with no "plan B"... I guess I"m kind of resigned to that... on long treks (which won't be that often for me ... I'll pack some extra water/food bars and make sure somebody at home has a copy of my travel plans.

I want to do my own maint. keeping proper documentation so that if challenged on a future warranty claim I can prove service was done. I also plan to go by the local dealer every 6K miles and pay them for (what I hope is) an hour or less of shop time to plug the bike into the diag. computer to compare firmware levels and check for TSBs / recalls ... unless I can figure out another way to make those things happen....


***** >>>>> I would dearly love to be able to get the information on recalls / TSBs, and the release of new firmware (like fuel maps) but I have not found a source for that yet... if anybody else has done so please post! <<<<< *****


Jim
JRWooden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 05:59 AM   #47
SQD8R
Eat squids and be merry
 
SQD8R's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: The Village: 7553'34"W, 4517'42"N
Oddometer: 7,357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lopoetve
I've been shopping for an adventure bike for a bit now, and a friend made me promise I'd at least give the new BMWs a try. So, as well as the Uly and Strom, I'll be traveling down to the BMW shop to take a look, but this is the question I don't know -

Buell reliability has always been a little questionable with a few design choices (rear wheel bearings?), but generally solid, and maintenance on those buggers is dead simple (yay air cooled twin).
The Strom, from what I've read, is dead reliable, and also easy to work on.

I'm passing on KTM because of the maintenance nightmare I've seen - but where does the new BMW twins fit in? How hard are they to work on, and how has longevity and reliability been (historically, since these are new bikes) for the company?
Check out f650.com for reliability. High mileage f650 variants on site. Also check out micapeak.com

FWIW I've got over 130,000 km on a r12gs and hp2 and no issues, esp. off-road.
__________________
2006 BMW HP2E: Teutonic Dreadnought
2011 Husqvarna TE630: Swedish heritage, German engineering, Italian flair
2011 BMW S1000RR: The Barvarian Bullet
Married men don't live longer, it just seems longer.
Sour grapes are a lesser man's fruit.
SQD8R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 07:49 AM   #48
gungnir
Norse adventurer
 
gungnir's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Location: Tempe, Arizona
Oddometer: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighTechCoonass
If the Japs built an equal bike to the F800gs I would buy it!!!
Provided it is available on the US market.
__________________
'03 BMW F650GS DAKAR
gungnir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 08:05 AM   #49
Dave92029
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2003
Location: Escondido, CA
Oddometer: 502
Not bashing BMW... just the truth

Just a little background: I have ridden BMW's since 1983 and accumulated over 860,000 miles on BMW bikes.

I have been stranded several times dues to mechanical failures. Since I used to travel long distances, I always rode a well maintained bike. Thus the failures, which were always covered under warranty/ goodwill.

I'm sorry to say the BMW bikes today are not as relaiable as the bikes that I first started riding back in the 1980's.

When I get together with other BMW riders ( I still own a R1200GS), the conversation seems to always get arround to mechanical problems that the dealer fixed under warranty. BMW riders used to talk about the long trips that they just completed or had planned.

It is my personal experience that the new BMW bikes are not particularly reliable. I strongly suggest having a towing service contract, like AAA premier, prior to going on a long trip. It is also a good idea to have a complete listing of BMW dealers in case you need assistance.

The new "F" series bikes look very interesting, but for $5000 less you can buy a totally relaible V Strom. The V Strom may be "souless", but by that I guess you mean that you have a Mechanically uneventful trip. I feel that mechanically uneventful trips are a Good thing.

I have enjoyed ridding BMW's and I wish BMW would stop having their customers beta test their bikes. Perhaps BMW, which is a low volume mfg. should focus on making less models, but making them much better than they are today.

I am enjoying ridding my DL650, and leave the R1200GS at home.
__________________
Dave
Escondido, CA
IBA # 43
Dave92029 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 08:19 AM   #50
slide
A nation in despair
 
Joined: Jul 2003
Location: NM, USA
Oddometer: 21,119
My DL1000 stranded me twice. I've never had any BMW of any year strand me. Admittedly, I never owned a BMW >2001 but still the statement that the DL is more reliable than a BMW isn't, IMO, supported by the facts.

Also is the only reason you ride to get from A to B? Why bother on a bike you say is souless? Why not take the train or a truck? Even if you could prove to me that Bike A is less reliable than boring bike B, I'd rather take bike A and accept the risk of trouble. I mean, this is a sport, not a trudge.
slide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 08:56 AM   #51
Monkey_Boy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Oddometer: 7,469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildman
Do you actually have an opinion on the F650GS or F800GS? One, to quote you, "based on fact".
You don't need facts to have an opinion. You proved that one already.

But seriously, the new 800GS looks awesome, a larger fuel tank would be nice, but hey, what can you do? So you live with it.

My Bombardier ATV had a Rotax engine. Rock-solid performance, no problems. I suspect BMW has a good engine there. Plus, these new bikes are much simpler than the big bikes, so I'd be inclined to think they're as safe a bet as anything BMW makes, on the plus side. I also like the steel tube frame better than a cast unit for off-road work.

If I was planning a particular trip and I determined the 800GS was the best choice for that trip, I'd buy it and roll the dice.

To own a BMW you have to really enjoy the bike and be willing to live with the warts and cost of ownership. Nothing right or wrong with that. Ride what you want to. It's all good.
Monkey_Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 09:07 AM   #52
Monkey_Boy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Oddometer: 7,469
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden
MB:

I guess I'm on the other end of the spectrum ... I am still riding the bike I bought new in 1982 ... if my F650GS ever gets here, there will be a cat fight in the garage I'm sure....

Jim
I have a terrible disease: I buy a bike for a particular trip, do the trip, then sell it. Costly for sure. Silly, for sure. But hey, you only go around once. I bought the 1150GS for just one trip to Baja. Perfect bike for that one. I don't care about brand names, just what the bike will do for me.

Now, the DL650 I took to Canada and Alaska this past June, it's a keeper, it is such a joy to ride, simple, zero worries about road trouble. I sold the DL1000 and I'm ridding myself of the beast of all beasts, a 2002 Goldwing. Speaking of no soul, the GW is the poster child of soullessness. Plus, the riding position is too cramped for my long legs.

I put about 4,500 miles per year on the race track, so my 2006 Gixxer 750 will go after the end of this season for a new track bike.

I love this illness.
Monkey_Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 09:19 AM   #53
Lopoetve OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Lafayette, CO
Oddometer: 667
Quote:
Originally Posted by slide
Also is the only reason you ride to get from A to B? Why bother on a bike you say is souless? Why not take the train or a truck? Even if you could prove to me that Bike A is less reliable than boring bike B, I'd rather take bike A and accept the risk of trouble. I mean, this is a sport, not a trudge.
This is the simple truth I think. I'd rather ride something I question, but enjoy the journey and the company of the bike, than not enjoy it but be guaranteed to get there.

Part of the adventure is dealing with adversity if it arises, right?
Lopoetve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 09:24 AM   #54
Lopoetve OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Lafayette, CO
Oddometer: 667
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave92029

The new "F" series bikes look very interesting, but for $5000 less you can buy a totally relaible V Strom. The V Strom may be "souless", but by that I guess you mean that you have a Mechanically uneventful trip. I feel that mechanically uneventful trips are a Good thing.
.
For me, soulless means I look at the bike and shrug. I have no urge to go anywhere, no interest in riding other than as a cheap alternative to driving, and no interest in exploring. It's a fine piece of transportation - so is a corolla, and if not being ~involved~ with your riding machine is fine for you, it does its job just fine. If you look for something that actually interests you in riding, actually makes you want to ride every time you look at it, the V-strom may or may not do it for you, and for me it doesn't any more than my Ninja 650 did. I look at it and just have no interest in doing anything with it. My Sportster, every time I look at it, I WANT to ride. I want to find someplace new to go. Same with my Old CBR, before I sold it (trust me, I regret that one). It's the difference between loving the journey, and loving the ride, and for me, I need both. The Sporty felt right when I sat on it. The V-strom just didn't feel wrong, it mostly didn't feel anything.
Lopoetve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 09:26 AM   #55
slide
A nation in despair
 
Joined: Jul 2003
Location: NM, USA
Oddometer: 21,119
Yes. Well, it used to be, but since bikes got so reliable, we forget the old days of elemental riding where you had to contend with many things.

I'm sure ancient ancestors would laugh at us saying we are adventure riders when our idea of adventure is a good but unpaved road or having to contend with using our cell phones to call the next dealer to address a needed repair on our bikes.

Of course the other side of this is that the reality is we get maybe 2 weeks off to do a trip. If we get a major breakdown 1 day in, we're stuck until next year.

I guess like all things, you pay your price and pick your poison.
slide is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 09:27 AM   #56
Wildman
In my castle
 
Wildman's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: The Kingdom of Kent
Oddometer: 17,577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monkey_Boy
You don't need facts to have an opinion. You proved that one already...
__________________
Ridden; GBR CYM DEU FRA ESP AND MCO ITA BEL SCT LUX CHE SMR LIE AUT NLD POL LTU LVA EST SWE FIN NOR DNK CZE SVK HUN ROU BGR GRC MKD SRB ALB MNE BIH HRV SVN MYS IRL BRA MAR PRT ARE USA ISL JPN MLT Planning; AUS TUR MDA UKR MEX BLR MNG RUS KAZ TJK KGZ SEN ZAF ZMB MWI NZL IND CPN
Wildman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 09:30 AM   #57
Monkey_Boy
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Oddometer: 7,469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildman

All in fun, my friend.
Monkey_Boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 02:55 PM   #58
AngryRed
Lost in Cyber Space
 
AngryRed's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Vegas, yeah woo...
Oddometer: 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert Dave
So why get a BMW at all? Because my Strom doesn't do dirt and most dirtbikes don't have enough balls on pavement for what I want. BMW simply offers a machine that currently doesn't have a Jap equivalent...or I'd buy it instead. There isn't another BMW out there that could convince me to get on board. If I was only riding asphalt or dirt there's plenty of better choices fror me. So I'll have to pay for the passion of this particular bike, while I hope that after getting it I'll carry on about what great fun it is I don't feel any need to defend it against people who don't feel the same passion, I also won't be a cheerleader for the aspects of ownership that are already a turn off before I even take delivery.
Well said... It is a shame these bikes are available outside the US though.
__________________
--------------------


2013 Super Tenere
AngryRed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 04:19 PM   #59
Desert Dave
Enjoying the moment
 
Desert Dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Tracy, CA
Oddometer: 2,649
Quote:
Originally Posted by slide

Also is the only reason you ride to get from A to B? Why bother on a bike you say is souless? Why not take the train or a truck? Even if you could prove to me that Bike A is less reliable than boring bike B, I'd rather take bike A and accept the risk of trouble. I mean, this is a sport, not a trudge.
True words.

I guess it's all how you define souless or lack of character. I've owned a number of track bikes that I never made an emotional connection with, they were just a collection of parts to get the job done as efficiently as possible, BUT those souless machines allowed me to have some of my best experiences on two wheels.

I've also had bikes in the garage that made me look back everytime I walked by, and I definately would make a connection kickstarting them and feeling the character as I let out the clutch, but a short ride was enough.

I always follow my heart when buying a bike (or you'll never be happy) but I need to know the bike will get the job done also. Wierd thing is the more fun I have on a bike the more I start to give it the second looks before turning out the lights in the garage.

For me the 800GS is a decent compromise between all of that.
__________________
See what I've been up to! Ongoing Ride Report



Desert Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2008, 04:32 PM   #60
Desert Dave
Enjoying the moment
 
Desert Dave's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Tracy, CA
Oddometer: 2,649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lopoetve
Part of the adventure is dealing with adversity if it arises, right?
You bet!

Thing is I get myself into more than enough adversity with about any bike I care to, I might as well stack the odds in my own favor.

I've never had a problem with feeling like I didn't break enough stuff on the trail
__________________
See what I've been up to! Ongoing Ride Report



Desert Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 03:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014