ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-13-2008, 10:01 AM   #1
Cross Country Ural OP
BAH!
 
Cross Country Ural's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Ontario
Oddometer: 81
I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador!

(A taste of what's to come)



Day 1
Waterloo to Montreal:

It was 6:00am, and the cool morning air stung my face as I road towards our standard bike trip starting point. I had spent the night before at my going away BBQ, saying farewell to the people I had worked alongside for the past eight years. I had just resigned from my job running the parts department at a local motorcycle dealership. I would be starting a new job teaching Russian history at a university in September, but for the month of August I was officially unemployed. What better way to celebrate my month of unemployment than a motorcycle ride to Labrador.

My former co-worker (and longtime bike trip partner) Brian, was taking his vacation at the same time and coming with me. The two of us had been planning this trip for the better part of a year. Together we would ride the 2500kms from home to the end of the Trans-Labrador, and then turn around and do it all again on the 2500kms back. I would be riding my trusty Ural Gear Up, and Brian would ride his DR650. The plan was to camp every night starting as soon as we started heading North on hwy 389.We would haul in all our food and fuel and live in the wild like a couple of drifters for the better part of a week.

The vibrant pink sunrise was a fitting departure note as we headed North-East towards Montreal.


By around noon we had made it to the outskirts of the town of Perth, where just ahead, ominous storm clouds were growing. We suited up in preparation for the rain we were bound to get.




As we entered downtown Perth the clouds opened up with a rainstorm of biblical proportions. We were stopped at a traffic light when I was suddenly stunned by a blinding flash. A split second later, I jumped out of my seat as an ear-splitting BZZZZZZZRRRRRTTTT cracked through the air. Sparks showered down all around us. The sound emanated from my right, so I instinctively took a quick glance and saw a hydro transformer high up on a pole billowing black smoke from all sides. My eyes met with Brian’s, and silently we exchanged looks of “What the F%$# was that!” Needless to saw we gunned it out of there and soon found an overhang to take shelter under.




It rained…… and rained……. And rained some more.




For and hour we waited there, and not once did the rain let up enough for us to make our escape. Eventually the rain slowed down and we decided to make a run for it. Shortly thereafter it stopped and we made up some time along hwy 7. However, the time we made up was quickly lost again as yet another torrential downpour forced us to seek shelter once again. As we were waiting we noticed the highway was starting to pool with water. Within five minutes the highway was flooded with half a foot of water.





We watched with amusement as drivers, unaware of the flooding, plowed their cars into the water at full speed. Then some poor guy on a cruiser got drenched when came flying into the flooded area.



Another hour passed as we waited for the rain to let up. It slowed enough for us to continue on, but kept drizzling all the way until we stopped at our hotel in Montreal. We spent a good deal of time drying out our drenched gear with hair dryers, and after a good nights sleep, wouldn’t you know it….. it was still raining in the morning!

(Stayed tuned, we've got offroad riding, camping, animal encounters and much more adventure to come shortly)

__________________
www.als-adventures.blogspot.com
25,000kms across North America on a Ural

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373029
"I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador" (2008)
Cross Country Ural is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2008, 10:29 AM   #2
klrobins
Gnarly Adventurer
 
klrobins's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Location: Stoney Creek, ON
Oddometer: 136
FANTASTIC!!! (... where's my boss at... gotta quit)
__________________
Kristi from Canada
klrobins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2008, 10:35 AM   #3
GB
Mod Squad
 
GB's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto, ON
Oddometer: 55,861
Get to work Kristi!!

Great ride..

__________________
ADV decals, patches & flag? Here
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2008, 10:44 AM   #4
Twistn'roads
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Twistn'roads's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Cambridge, Ont., Canada
Oddometer: 385
I bought my Strom from your former place of employment this past Spring. I was looking at your rig parked out back on one of my visits to talk with Rob. Labrador is on my to-do list after I do Alaska next year. I look forward to your report. Oh, and good luck in your new endevours!

Steve
Twistn'roads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2008, 11:29 AM   #5
Cross Country Ural OP
BAH!
 
Cross Country Ural's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Ontario
Oddometer: 81
Day Two

Day Two

Montreal to Quebec City

We departed in the rain, heading up Autoroute 40 to Quebec City. Because of the rain and general poor scenery, I took no pictures until we arrived in Quebec City. We checked into ‘Hotel Pur” which is a independent hotel in the downtown area. It’s an odd place, what I’d call a “new age hotel” done in a black and white contrast, minimalist style. It’s a really cool place that was right up my alley.







The rain had finally stopped by the time we checked in, so we went for a little stroll through Old Quebec. Founded in 1608, Quebec City is one of the oldest cities in North America, (this year it celebrates its 400th birthday.) It's also the only city North of Mexico that still retains its fortified city walls.








Naturally we took the time to enjoy a few pints in a pub that used to be a storage bunker for gunpowder back in the 1600’s





We wandered around a little more and then headed back to the hotel for an early night for day three would be a long one……

Stay Tuned.
__________________
www.als-adventures.blogspot.com
25,000kms across North America on a Ural

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373029
"I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador" (2008)

Cross Country Ural screwed with this post 11-05-2011 at 06:11 PM
Cross Country Ural is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2008, 12:52 PM   #6
Cross Country Ural OP
BAH!
 
Cross Country Ural's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Ontario
Oddometer: 81
Day 3: Quebec City to Baie-Comeau

Quebec City to Baie-Comeau

We left Quebec City at 9:30am under overcast skies and cold misty rain. That’s three days straight of rain and I seriously hoped this wouldn’t set the tone for the trip. Normally I don’t mind rain when I’m riding, it adds an extra dimension of challenge to the ride, however our worst fear was that it would rain constantly in Labrador, and we’d be forced to ride and camp soaking wet for six days.



With Quebec City growing smaller in our mirrors we headed North along hwy 138. I’d driven the South shore of the St. Lawrence before, and it’s flat and boring for the most part. I was expecting much of the same from the North shore. Fortunately I was in for quite the surprise. I was amazed how the opposite shore could be so much better. Another biker from Quebec explained to us how hwy 138 was “Quebec’s motorcycle road,” and with good reason. It’s a proverbial roller coaster of hills and curves.



Aside from the constant rain and chilly temperature (heated grips are a lifesaver), the only drawback was the fact that including seven days worth of food, clothing, camping gear, 10 liters of water and 40 liters of extra fuel, I was probably carrying close to 400 pounds of gear in the sidecar. This meant that at wide open throttle the Ural would struggle to maintain 60kph while crawling up the many steep grades. On the flipside however, I hit a personal best with the Ural of 115kph downhill.

Since this isn’t a particularly well traveled highway, especially as you continue North, the road is interrupted by a ferry crossing to get traffic across an open bay.







After disembarking from the ferry, we rode for about another hour and then stopped along the North shore to have a bit of lunch.




Since it was such a cold day, we both broke out our camp stoves and were looking forward to a warm bowl of soup, but after multiple attempts to keep the stoves lit, we determined it was far too windy for them to work. I resorted to eating tuna and crackers.



By the time we made it to Baie-Comeau, the weather had started to clear up and the wind had died down. We decided on a motel so that we could properly dry out our gear before setting off on the real adventure the following morning.



Stay tuned, more to come......
__________________
www.als-adventures.blogspot.com
25,000kms across North America on a Ural

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373029
"I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador" (2008)
Cross Country Ural is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2008, 02:18 PM   #7
Cross Country Ural OP
BAH!
 
Cross Country Ural's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Ontario
Oddometer: 81
Day 4: Baie-Comeau to Somewhere North of Gagnon.

Baie-Comeau to Somewhere North of Gagnon.

Upon awakening and looking out the window that morning we were greeted by…… sun!!!! GLORIOUS SUN! After three days of rain, it was absolutely wonderful, there wasn’t a cloud in the sky!



I was also encouraged by the license plate cover of the car parked beside us.



We both set off in a fabulous moods. Turning left onto hwy 389 marked the beginning of our approximately 1200km ride due North. This sign also looked promising.



Not more than five minutes down the road, things already started looking good.







Heading North you soon come across the Manic-Trois hydroelectric dam (I think, but maybe it’s Manic-Deux)




The excellent riding continued for hours. Empty roads, (save the occasional speeding logging truck) hills, twisties, untouched lakes and vast forests. If it weren’t so bumpy with the frost heaves, this would be a sport-bikers heaven. All this good riding made us hungry, so we pulled off the highway and rode into a hydro cut a little ways as to not have our meal disturbed.





I broke out the burner and cooked up a pot of delicious seafood chowder.



Mmmmmm, tasty!



After lunch we continued north until we came upon the much more impressive Manic-Cinq hydroelectric dam.





The reservoir that feeds the dam.



At the base of Manic-Cinq is where the road turns to gravel for the duration of the trip North (with the exception of a few short paved sections.)





Of course, not more than five minutes after we hit the gravel we had our first two casualties of the trip. I was clipping down the road at 70kph when all of a sudden the back end of the bike went all squirrelly on me. Of course that could only mean one thing – a flat tire.



Have I mentioned how much I LOVE the Ural? Had this happened on any other bike it would have been a pain in the but ordeal to pull the tire off and plug it. Not for the Ural however. I swapped the spare tire on in ten minutes flat. Brian however, suffered a small injury while he was helping me change the tire.



With the tire replaced, we continued down the road we continued, loving every second of it.



To our left we could see the Manicouagan Reservoir. The Manicouagan was created approx. 215 million years ago when a meteor five kilometers wide hit the earth. Later this day we met a man who guides geologists in the area. He explained that when the meteor hit, the explosion started a fire that raged from here to New Jersey. It also sent chunks of rock flying outwards with such force that they carved most of the valleys that make up the rolling landscape of Northern Quebec.

The Manicouagan as viewed from space.



The Manicouagan as viewed by me



The scale of this reservoir is massive. It covers something like 2000 square kilometers!

A few minutes later we pulled into the “town” of Relais-Gabriel to refuel. It was here that I paid the most I’ve ever paid for gas to date, at $1.70 per liter! Didn’t matter though, we didn’t have a choice. These five buildings are the extent of the “town.”





Heading North from Gabriel you soon come to the ghost town of Gagnon. Gagnon was a former mining town that was bulldozed in 1985 when the mine was exhausted. Left behind is an eerie reminder of former glory. All that remains are the wide boulevards:



Sewers:




Sidewalks:



And curb cutouts where driveways to people’s homes used to be:



Dusk was fast approaching, so we decided to find a place to camp just North of Gagnon. We came across an old logging road that led off the highway so we followed it until it came to a river.



We found a perfect little clearing beside a slow moving river and set up camp for the night.





I've got to take a short break from posting, but more will come later tonight or tomorrow. Stay tuned.
__________________
www.als-adventures.blogspot.com
25,000kms across North America on a Ural

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373029
"I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador" (2008)

Cross Country Ural screwed with this post 11-05-2011 at 06:12 PM
Cross Country Ural is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 02:32 PM   #8
Cross Country Ural OP
BAH!
 
Cross Country Ural's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Ontario
Oddometer: 81
DAY 5: Somewhere North of Gagnon to Somewhere North of Churchill Falls

DAY 5

I woke up after a surprisingly restful (but cold) sleep and treated myself to a breakfast of utterly disgusting powdered scrambled eggs.



We broke camp and continued North towards the “Fire Lake” mine, where we saw the big mining trucks dumping their loads of iron to be picked up by the approaching train.





Starting at the Fire Lake site, the highway becomes quite interesting. I’m assuming that this is the “unimproved” section of the highway. The section that they haven’t straightened and widened, and this section follows the contours of the land which makes for some really interesting riding. The next 60 kilometers could be taken at no more than 50 kph, so tight were the curves, and so abrupt were the hills.



If you were to miss a corner, you’d literally end up sliding into a lake. Guardrail…. What guardrail?



The terrain also changed from thick forests to scraggly little trees and lots of rock.



The rail line feeding the two mines in the area is built up above the highway so that it can run straight as an arrow.



This rail line leads to another open pit mine that is situated further North, just outside Fermont.





A short distance from this mine is the unique town of Fermont. Fermont is interesting because of a building design that the locals call ‘The Wall”



The Wall is a self contained structure that stands 1.3 kilometers long and 50 meters high. Inside this structure is everything a community needs to survive, apartments, schools, hotels, a grocery store, swimming pool, restaurants, you name it. From what I understand, the winters are so harsh up here that “the wall” was built so that the residents would never have to set foot outside the complex during the winter months. It also shelters a subdivision of houses that were built behind the wall. (This shot gives a good vantage point of how the wall stretches down into the distance to the left.



Take a look at this next picture. Notice how all the trucks in the parking lot have orange flags on the bumper? I assume this is so that they’re easier to see during blowing snow conditions?



And of course, a mere couple of kilometers North of Fermont marks the border with Labrador. This was a big deal for me since prior to this trip, Labrador was the only Canadian Province that I hadn’t yet been to yet.



Just across the border is the thriving metropolis of Labrador City.



Labrador City boasts a gas station, small mall, WalMart, MacDonalds, and more importantly a Tim Horton’s. During our refueling however, both Brian and I were mobbed by the locals wanting to know everything about our trip. It seemed that when one of them would leave, three more would appear. We spent, no word of a lie, over an hour and a half standing in the parking lot taking to people. We finally made a break for it, only to be stopped half way across the parking lot by the manager of the Tim Horton’s who had another pocket full of questions. We were both looking forward to a delicious coffee and sandwich, but chatting to the locals was great fun. We asked one guy about getting a tour of the mine, he responded with, “Well, my shift starts at 8:00pm, so if you guys want to hang around until then I can take you in. Otherwise go down to the security booth and ask for Dan. Tell him Bill from the 8pm shift sent you, he knows me, and he’ll let you in for a tour.” Labrador City truly has the frontier, small town feel, where quite literally everyone knows everyone. Brian and I were completely out of place there and the whole town could see it.

I needed to purchase a tire pump in case we had another flat. I used up all my co2 cartridges bringing the spare up to the proper pressure. Unfortunately the only place to purchase something of the sort was at the local WalMart. I despise the place, and needless to say I was none-too-happy to have to spend my money there.



After lunch we headed North out of Labrador City only to hit 70 kilometers of brutal construction that had just torn the road to pieces.



The road was so bumpy that one of the 1000 pound ratchet straps holding Brian’s luggage on snapped! It simply snapped in two! It also managed to wrap itself around the rear wheel before he noticed it was broken. Luckily he didn’t go down, and had to spend ten minutes untangling it from the spokes.

Upon entering Labrador, the road becomes hwy 500. Sadly, while it’s still as bumpy as the Quebec section, the Labrador section of the highway has been “improved” meaning they’ve straightened and widened it. While it’s much more fun to ride the “unimproved” sections, this way at least you're able to take in more of the scenery without having to concentrate so hard on the road ahead.



The terrain itself also changes quite drastically from rolling hills and forests in Quebec, to flat plains and marsh in Labrador.



We reached the site where the Churchill River used to run before they diverted it to feed the hydroelectric dam. All that’s left of this once mighty river is this dry and rocky river bed.



We rode until the sun started to dip behind the trees, then pulled off the highway and found a nice clearing. We set up our camp to the backdrop of a brilliant sunset.



I wolfed down a dinner of sardines in tomato sauce with crackers while Brian looked on in disgust.



What a perfect end to yet another a perfect day in Labrador.

__________________
www.als-adventures.blogspot.com
25,000kms across North America on a Ural

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373029
"I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador" (2008)

Cross Country Ural screwed with this post 11-05-2011 at 06:12 PM
Cross Country Ural is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 02:40 PM   #9
Hotmamaandme
Wishing I was riding RTW
 
Hotmamaandme's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Gardnerville NV
Oddometer: 2,701
Cool trip and cool ride

We just got a Gear Up in April and have been loving it. Our Gear Up came with a Floor pump like for a bike tire? Did you not get one? Should be in the trunk. I keep a Sears electric cigarette lighter pump in the trunk as well.

Any way the Ural is a great ride for long dirt roads with slippry surfaces and safer in a lot of ways than a bike thats why I put the wife on one.

Keep the report going.
__________________
My screen name is kind of long. I am the "ME" part, my name is Cory.

Jimmy Lewis quote: "Those KLRs are full of potential. Just takes a rider..."
Hotmamaandme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 02:49 PM   #10
Cross Country Ural OP
BAH!
 
Cross Country Ural's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Ontario
Oddometer: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hotmamaandme
We just got a Gear Up in April and have been loving it. Our Gear Up came with a Floor pump like for a bike tire? Did you not get one? Should be in the trunk. I keep a Sears electric cigarette lighter pump in the trunk as well.

Any way the Ural is a great ride for long dirt roads with slippry surfaces and safer in a lot of ways than a bike thats why I put the wife on one.

Keep the report going.
My bike did come with a tire pump, but the hose split on it this spring rendering it useless, so now I just carry a co2 cartridge inflator. I wanted a proper tire pump just to be safe after having that flat though.
__________________
www.als-adventures.blogspot.com
25,000kms across North America on a Ural

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373029
"I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador" (2008)
Cross Country Ural is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 03:28 PM   #11
DREW823
Gnarly Adventurer
 
DREW823's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Location: Peterson Mountain, NEW JERSEY
Oddometer: 320
I'm enjoying your report..Thanks for posting it Eat some real food though Nice pictures..I'll have to see this trip through.Good Luck
__________________
06 Concours 03KLR 650 02 VulcanClassic 81 KE 100
DREW823 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 03:39 PM   #12
Abenteuerfahrer
Deaf on Wheels
 
Abenteuerfahrer's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: Leland, North Carolina, USA
Oddometer: 2,287
Enjoyed your pictures and narratives. Keep it coming and hope that you do the entire loop to Newfoundland...since you quit your job, might as well do the entire loop ride. I did it counterclockwise on a 1200 GS last July. Had some very bad road construction before me: one in Labrador and one in Quebec. Ride safe and take your time...don't forget to have some Cod Tongues for dinner at the Carthwright Hotel dinning room or Gros Morne Seafood Chalet in Rocky Harbor, NL.
Abenteuerfahrer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 05:25 PM   #13
scarysharkface
30-125
 
scarysharkface's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Location: Lakland
Oddometer: 12,959
Beautiful! How many bear did all that wonderful food attract?

John
__________________

The road to Hell is paved...
Save $5 on a Smugmug subscription when you use my coupon:
yBr7OofIPuOP6
'98 DR350 for sale http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1000749
scarysharkface is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 08:06 PM   #14
conchscooter
Beastly Adventurer
 
conchscooter's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Florida Keys
Oddometer: 1,852
I wonder if your students will pester you for an essay this September "How I spent my Summer." D'you suppose they'd believe you? Hunting bear on a Ural...?
__________________
http://www.keywestdiary.com

IBA#39,523
conchscooter is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2008, 10:10 PM   #15
Cross Country Ural OP
BAH!
 
Cross Country Ural's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Southern Ontario
Oddometer: 81
Day 6: Somewhere North of Churchill Falls to Goose Bay

I couldn’t sleep. I tossed and turned for what seemed like hours, and I just couldn’t get to sleep. Whenever I’m camping I always wear earplugs. If I don’t, my heart starts pounding at every little noise. Every little rustle and every little twig cracking sends my mind racing, “what was that? Was that a bear?” Even with ear plugs in that night, I was still kept awake by thoughts of what I would do if I was awoken in the middle of the night by a bear or other large animal rummaging through our camp.

I must have drifted off at some point because I awoke to Brian’s whispered voice, “Psssst, Allen……. Wake up Allen…….. there’s a BEAR on your bike!”

HOLY CRAP!!! My heart jumped up into my throat. In a panicked frenzy I ripped out my earplugs, grabbed the flashlight in my left hand and the rifle in my right, chambered a round and tore open the zipper to the tent. I thrust myself outside and shone the light at the bike to discover………..









Nothing. A whole lot of nothing. The cold night air was dead silent. Through the fog of sleep, I slowly pieced it together and realized that I must have dreamed Brian's voice warning me about a bear. My mind was playing tricks on me. Looking at my watch it was only shortly after midnight. Oh man, this was going to be a long night.

* * *

I woke up to the sun shining brightly into my tent. My watch read 4:26am. “You’ve got to be kidding me,” I thought. The sun rises here before 4:30am? What I had forgotten, and didn’t figure out until later that day is that there had been a time change upon entering Labrador. It was 4:30am by my time, but the real time was closer to 6am.


Anyways, after a granola bar for breakfast it was time to ride out of the bush and hit the highway again.



Labrador is a fisherman’s dream. There are literally thousands of untouched rivers and lakes up here. I can’t confirm whether there are any fish in them though. Brian brought his fishing rod along, but upon trying to use it, he discovered that the reel had broken beyond repair somewhere along the way.



Later that morning we came across a truck that had either been stolen from Goose Bay, driven out here and burned, or had caught fire along the highway and the driver just pushed it into the ditch and left it. Out here there’s no fire department that will rush out and extinguish your car fire for you. If this were to happen anywhere else in the country, emergency crews would have responded and this wreck would have been cleared away in no time flat. Here in Labrador a burnt out truck gets left in a ditch, and no one seems phased by it.



There wasn’t too much to see along this stretch of the highway, and Brian and I were anxious to get to Goose Bay.



We arrived in Goose Bay at around 2:00pm.



Upon entering the town, I saw the most glorious sight



Brian and I were joking earlier that we should really do an advertising campaign for Tim Hortons. We wouldn’t be true Canadians if we didn’t love Tim Hortons, and to say that Brian and I love Timmy’s is an understatement. It’s a bike trip tradition to have lunch at Timmy’s wherever we are, and we’ve been to more Tim Hortons in more locations than we care to remember. I never expected to find one in Goose Bay however, and it made me smile inside to see that glorious white and yellow sign beckoning.

After lunch we refueled and asked the gas attendant where we could get some nice pictures of the bay. “Uhhhh, nowhere really” was his response. Well actually that’s not entirely true. What he said was more along the lines of, “well you can go 33 kilometers that way and then turn left on some dirt road, and then go up a big hill and pull into the second driveway on your left and walk into Dan’s backyard. Dan lives up on a big hill and you can get some nice pictures from there. He won’t mind.” Well I wasn’t about to walk into some strangers backyard to get a few pictures.

I was able to get a few pictures of the bay from a hill in town before we turned around and headed South.



Yup, after coming 1200kms up that bone rattling highway, we were crazy enough to turn around and do it all again.



That night we made it about 200 kilometers South of Goose Bay, where we set up camp for the night.

Stay tuned, more to come.
__________________
www.als-adventures.blogspot.com
25,000kms across North America on a Ural

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=373029
"I Quit My Job And Rode To Labrador" (2008)

Cross Country Ural screwed with this post 08-15-2008 at 10:42 AM
Cross Country Ural is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014