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Old 09-04-2008, 09:57 PM   #136
Motor Boy
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Great bike review RTW! I test road a yellow/black one yesterday at my local dealer and that pretty much sealed the deal. I now have to wait 4 agonizing months for my own yellow/black beauty.
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Old 09-05-2008, 12:51 AM   #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperiate
And where are you riding that there's 240 miles between gas stations? Do you dislike stretching your legs? I'd think 5.7 hours without stopping would be brutal(ly boring) even on a great bike like that GSA. You and your uncle are carrying 10% of your bikes' dry weight in fuel just so you can pioneer research into deep vein thrombosis.
In the states your right, but on a ride out in a lot of 3rd world countrys around the world fuel capacity is everything.
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Old 09-05-2008, 04:22 AM   #138
TheCowboy
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The 800 in the gravel

Took my brand new F800 out for a 56 mile loop all on gravel/dirt last night with the stock (road) tires.

I was VERY suprised how well she handled on the gravel with the stock tires - the transistion from pave to gravel was very impressive and during the entire ride I never once felt squrrley (can't speel).

Can't wait to get some D606's on her to see what she will really do in the rough stuff. BTW - the bike is very well balanced and the power...OMG!! Happy so far!

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Old 09-05-2008, 12:14 PM   #139
RTW Motorcycling OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NEIN
I'll add my thanks to this as well. Good stuff. What time are you going to be a Valk's Sat?
Hey Nein,

I'm thinking of heading there around 1:00 and hang out for a bit if there is free beer and hotdogs. See you there.
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Old 09-05-2008, 12:29 PM   #140
RTW Motorcycling OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperiate
I took my 800GS 230.4 miles on a tank of gas. The OBC said it could go 10 more miles, and it took 4.217 gallons. That's 54.6 mpg.

I've not run it down that low again, but my personal best mileage was all highway (including some stop and go traffic) over the course of 55.9 miles. Average speed was 41mph. My calculations say I got 67.3mpg and the OBC says I got 66mpg. Without the traffic I'm confident it would have been more like 70.

I sure wish that style of riding was more suited to my temperment. I've gotten a low of 46mpg which was another highway run, but I really opened it up. I think I'd be hard pressed to get lower than that.

(Worst invention ever: Excel on a cell phone)

Hey Hyp,

Great to see some MPG results. They do go down a bit if you're lugging moer weight like bags and the such.

To your comment, the OBC is fairly ok at estimating remaining mileage. I had the engine out at various indicated mileages (actually kms). The lowest I saw was 6, a 12, a couple in the teens (15 and 18) and the highest was about 22. Not sure the logarithm that the computer uses to calculate or how heavily it weighs the fuel consumption over the most recent few miles, but in general as long as you are riding a steady pace it is pretty accurate. SLowing down when the fuel is getting low lets you stretch it out quite a bit. Stop and go traffic is a bit confusing for it and if you increase your speed as you get low on gas for whatever reason, it will get confused and that's when I got the cut out with still a fairly high number of supposedly remaining kms.
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Old 09-05-2008, 01:41 PM   #141
AngryRed
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Thanks again for all the time RTW. I got a deposit down on mine today
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Old 09-05-2008, 05:12 PM   #142
Navman
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Can someone delete this thread?

Now, not only do I have put my name on the list and wait an agonizingly long time to spend a lot of money, but I also have to buy my wife a new car for the priviledge of spending that money. I'm sure she work in some diamond earings into this deal too.

This is the bike that finally convinced me to finally register for this site, and this is one of the best threads I've read. I can't wait to get one.

Great job! Thanks for the good, balance info.
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Old 09-05-2008, 10:40 PM   #143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Navman
Can someone delete this thread?

Now, not only do I have put my name on the list and wait an agonizingly long time to spend a lot of money, but I also have to buy my wife a new car for the priviledge of spending that money. I'm sure she work in some diamond earings into this deal too.

This is the bike that finally convinced me to finally register for this site, and this is one of the best threads I've read. I can't wait to get one.

Great job! Thanks for the good, balance info.

Lol, navman, you have to get your crack negotiating team to work on your wife. They start off by telling her that you will really need two, maybe three motorbikes. One for the off road riding, one for the dirt/gravel roads and a third for a long distance tourer. After a few months of negotiations, and just before your bike is ready for pickup, you agree to settle for only one bike if she drops the demand for a new car and earings. And of course you will end with all three bikes, except only you know that it is wrapped up into one model:) Hopefully the wait list in your area will go quickly.
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Old 09-05-2008, 10:41 PM   #144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gnostic203
Thanks again for all the time RTW. I got a deposit down on mine today
Great news gnostic, any idea how long the wait list is in Vegas?
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Old 09-05-2008, 11:24 PM   #145
easyman05
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTW Motorcycling
Hey EasyMan,

In the end though, I'd have to say though that the 800 will allow you to get to some amazing riding that most countries can only imagine (and on roads that cars have nightmares about). And it is good enough for most long distance, highway riding. So I would go with the 800, unless you plan on doing almost excusively freeway riding.

Hope that helps.
Thank you very much, RTW!

One more question about the hard cases. Do you beleive the Pelican/Caribou cases are better than BMW OEM Vario for F800GS? Or was it just the price matter? And you still preferred hard cases over soft luggage like ZEGA FLEX from Touratech. Why?
TIA
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Old 09-06-2008, 10:29 AM   #146
RTW Motorcycling OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easyman05
Thank you very much, RTW!

One more question about the hard cases. Do you beleive the Pelican/Caribou cases are better than BMW OEM Vario for F800GS? Or was it just the price matter? And you still preferred hard cases over soft luggage like ZEGA FLEX from Touratech. Why?
TIA
Quote:
Originally Posted by easyman05
Thank you very much, RTW!

One more question about the hard cases. Do you beleive the Pelican/Caribou cases are better than BMW OEM Vario for F800GS? Or was it just the price matter? And you still preferred hard cases over soft luggage like ZEGA FLEX from Touratech. Why?
TIA
Hey Easyman,

Hmm, of course this is just my opinion so please disregard if it doesn't apply to you but the BMW cases are not really that great if you plan on taking your bike offroad. I think I only saw one set on a world tourer, a guy from Singapore was riding all the way across to Europe and we met him in Syria. Great guy and rider, but the bags were beat to hell and tied on with various stuff.

There are a lot of bags that look great, and function well in the city, but when pushed, they don't stand up well.

I would say as a generalization, that with this bike I would hope that people look for equipment (inlcuding luggage) that fits the personality and style of the bike. In short, it's a bike that can go offroad and do a little bit of everything so you gear should be able to handle this and be equally as flexible.

Maybe there are riders out there who manage to keep their bike upright at all times, but I'm not one of them, so when I look at luggage I wonder how it will stand tip overs, dumps, and outright crashes.

The basic "plastic" bags (eg. Givi, and even the BMW) are made for street use and not really designed for off road. They will actually hold up pretty good on the odd crash and surprise you, but it's a bonus and not something you should plan for.

The Touratech aluminum boxes are ok, but the problem with the moderate strength aluminum boxes is that it doesn't take to much to knock them out of square and once that happens, it is pretty hard to get them back to square and hence they will leak water and let in dust afterwards. We built our own aluminum boxes for Russia and slowly but surely they turned into octogons.

Soft luggage is an underappreciated alternative, some guys were using them and swore by them as they are much less likely to break your leg but the biggest turn off was the reduced safety as you feel ok leaving your hard boxes locked to your bike but less so with soft bags. If they work for your style of riding, then certainly consider them.

That leaves the category of tough gear, and there are two sets that fall into this category, heavy duty aluminum boxes and Pelican style. The heavy duty aluminum boxes are very tough and take a huge knock before they deform. If you do deform them, good luck trying to reshape them but it can be done. An example of these boxes would be Metal Mule. One of the guys would take his off and use it as the center stand when fixing flats. Pretty tough, but very expensive.

And then you have the Pelicans, which due to the material and impact absorbing structure, will withstand a surprising amount of force and still open and close, no problems. One thing to be aware of is any force of a crash gets absorbed by the bag, the attachment system from the bag to the rack, the rack, or the frame of the bike. Most systems are designed the failure point to be the lesser of the evils, usualy the attachment system of the bag to the bike. What works best for you and your style of riding is an individual choice. I was tired of retightening my attachment system so opted for a more strong fix to the rack.

The downside to these bags are that they are slightly smaller and side loading so it's hard to get a lot of stuff in them. That's why the other systems are mostly better for straightforward highway riding, baring price considerations.


So as a random comment, I'll throw out a ranking system for the luggage alternatives and anyone is welcome to toss in a type and where it fits in. A system similar to tire rating systems (on road and off road) may make sense as a broad generalization and if you are going to ride almost all highway, then your tires, bags, windshield, and crash protection should reflect that. If you plan on racing in the Dakar, power to you, but make sure your gear will bounce when it needs to:)


BMW Vario - 90:10 (good for 90% street, 10% off road)

Touratech Zega - 60:40

Pelican/Caribou - 50:50

Soft bags - 40:60
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Old 09-06-2008, 03:26 PM   #147
discochris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSEARS
In the states your right, but on a ride out in a lot of 3rd world countrys around the world fuel capacity is everything.
Or if you're doing Iron Butt type rides.

My Connie carries 7.5 gallons, and I can go about 220 max before hitting reserve, but for LD riding, I have a 3.5 gallon tourtank plumbed into the fuel system so I can go over 300 w/o stopping.

I'm looking forward to seeing how the first distance riders with these bikes add aux fuel to them.
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Old 09-06-2008, 08:27 PM   #148
bajaburro
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say aaaaahhhhh

Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperiate
And where are you riding that there's 240 miles between gas stations? Do you dislike stretching your legs? I'd think 5.7 hours without stopping would be brutal(ly boring) even on a great bike like that GSA. You and your uncle are carrying 10% of your bikes' dry weight in fuel just so you can pioneer research into deep vein thrombosis.
Thanks Doc!
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Old 09-06-2008, 08:28 PM   #149
Ron Wardman
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Location: South Oregon Coast
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Got it, rode it

I picked my new yellow 800 today from Hansen's in Medford. Rode it home via Jacksonville, Brookings and on to Myrtle Point. Quick review...better than I expected, engine is so responsive, good riding position. I am 5' 7 and opted for the low seat. It is just about right. It is lower than my 1200GS with a Sargent's low seat. The bike feels much lighter. 61 mpg on the first tank. I lucked out on the ride down 199. I got stopped at one of those lights that controls bridge construction and was the first in line when the light went green and so had a free pass though the twisties...bike felt super. Very gusty winds riding north on 101 but the bike hung in there great. Looking forward to many more miles quickely.

Ron Wardman screwed with this post 09-06-2008 at 09:02 PM
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Old 09-06-2008, 10:49 PM   #150
easyman05
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RTW Motorcycling
Hey Easyman,

BMW Vario - 90:10 (good for 90% street, 10% off road)

Touratech Zega - 60:40

Pelican/Caribou - 50:50

Soft bags - 40:60
Thank you very much, RTW!

I checked the Caribou/Pelican website but they do not yet offer cases for F800GS. What size are yours? 35L or larger?
I am thinking about a trip to Vladivostok next season/ or in reverse Vlad-k to Moscow/ and consider softbags #1 so far. But Pelican and MM interested me too.
Looked through your pix once again but failed to find what helmet are you rinding in. Is it enduro/MX with googles or a flip-up?
TIA
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