ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > Parallel Universe
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-02-2008, 05:55 PM   #106
RTW Motorcycling OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: B.C.
Oddometer: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by K_N_Fodder
Just sat on one at Lonestar in Austin, TX. As a cheapo-KLR rider I was basically just drooling, but there's a lot to drool over. Of course it already has a sold sign on it and if you get in line now you might have one next spring. I'm obviously not going to add anything to this discussion until I ride one from Tierra d. Fuego to Prudoe Bay , but it felt suprisingly approachable for a 5'9" guy with a piddling 32" inseam. Maybe even a little lower than my Corbin seated KLR. That and the CG was _obviously_ lower than the KLR. The only other obvious thing was the afterthought of a brake fluid reservoir...
Hey KN,

Thanks for the comments, I know you are kidding but I do have to disagree with you since you bring up that point. Many times, the most insightful comments come from riders at every stage in their exposure to any bike. People who look at the bike for the first time have a great initial cognitive reaction that is not yet clouded, people who have ridden it a bit have that insightful first "feel" from their rides. Once we get more than a few miles on a bike, we can point out how it feels then, but a lot of times we form opinions (rightly or wrongly) and can get a bit stagnant. The problem is that we are adaptable and we adjust to the bike so that sometimes if you ask someone about a certain feature or potential problem, the rider has to scratch his head and think about it, because it has been a while since he has been concious of the issue.

Slight tangent, but there is truly a lot of interesting points and questions brought up by riders at every position in riding spectrum, I think that it would be great if more people contributed their thoughts. I know sometimes it's hard as there seems to be a high level of expertise on almost all topics, but we all mostly fall into the average rider category and as such there will be a lot of other riders like us that will have the same perspective. Please post away!
RTW Motorcycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2008, 06:06 PM   #107
RTW Motorcycling OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: B.C.
Oddometer: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreddyJey
Hi, Thanks for an informative and good thread. I own a 800gs and I do not understand why every one are talking about changing the front wheel to a smaller one. I see no downsides with it, exept it feels a little nervous in the beginning. After couple of kms you get used to it.

One question from me too. Do you use the stock foot pegs? I get a bit tired after long stretches standing up.

Regards
Freddy
Hey Freddy,

Yup, you are right that if you haven't ridden much on a 21", it may feel like you have to add a bit more muscle to take it into the corners, but this is only realtive to the ease of cornering smaller tires and you stop thinking about it almost right away.

The stock footpegs are a bit on the small side as you say, bearable and made easier by a fair amount of shifting the feet, but for offroad guys who prefer to stand on their pegs a lot I can see a few going to a nice big platform. The pop off feature for the rubber on the pegs though is nice, I notice a bit more vibration on the feet with the rubber off. Nothing bad, just a little more noticeable.
RTW Motorcycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2008, 06:10 PM   #108
RTW Motorcycling OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: B.C.
Oddometer: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAM
T-Totally Awesome Information RTW.

Poof's directed me over here this evening.

Thanks for opening up that can o' worms, now pass the checkbook Bloo.

Mo' Pix !!

Lol, spending money on bikes is a simple joy, you won't regret it. Just tell your wife that she should be thankful that you are addicted to bikes, they are much cheaper than a car habit:)
RTW Motorcycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2008, 06:32 PM   #109
RTW Motorcycling OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: B.C.
Oddometer: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacix
RTW, thanks for all the information; it is just amazing.

I have two questions:

My F800Gs has now 8000kms and I am still using the stock tires (batllewing). I am planning to change for a mix one in the rear wheel and one with knobs for the front wheel. After all the tires you have burned out, what is your recommendation? TCK for the knobbly one?

The second question is about the fact of riding this trip with such a new bike, specially considering that all forums are plenty of bad experiences and problems due to the age of the bike. Why did you choose the F800GS? Where you thinking, this thing is gonna break and I will be sleeping in the middle of no where for a while?
Hey Pacix,

You are putting some great distances on your bike, always good to see someone riding it like it's meant to be ridden!

The default setup that I used was a Tourance on the rear and a TKC80 on the front. Along the same lines of the Tourance is the Anakee and a few others, the main trade off as you know is softer tires have better handling but less life. I wanted to be somewhere in the middle of that spectrum.

A knobbie on the front and a 90/10 tire on the back will pretty much last a similar distance, some people have been known to reverse the front after half the kms as the knobs wear uneven and cause a bit of a boucier ride. I rode mine to it's death, the knobbies were worn down in the middle which gives it a slight edge to get up over when cornering but it's not a big deal and in civilzation you can change it much sooner that that if you so desire.

As I mentioned, I'm not to picky about tires, some are, but for me I bought what was available, Currently I have a MT21 on the front, it was about $60.00 in South America and not many other options were available. Some say it's noisy, but it handles well in a wide variety of conditions. I'm guessing that in Spain you'll have great slection but don't know which brands are the most competitely priced. Stragely enough, here in Canada, even thouh we are right beside the US, it is much more expensive for tires. Go figure.


Another good thing about this set up is that if you are going to go on a pure dirt ride or long gravel ride and you want knobbies, it is easy to just change your rear tire to a TKC80 or whatever you have in your garage. I carried mine on the back and swapped it roadside. You can break the bead of the tire with your kickstand (works even with your rear tire off and the bike on the center stand). You probably already carry a couple of tire irons to fix flats since we have tubes so you have all the gear already.:)

In regards to the selection of the bike itself, funny thing but I wasn't too worried about it being a new model at all. I, like most people, used to repeat standard advice that first year models carry more risk but at the end of the day, companies are simpy better at pretesting their bikes and technologies are better. In the old days, the chances that something major would go wrong was much higher, these days, if there is anything, it'll likely be an irritant and a lot of times those don't get fixed by the next year anyway. As an example, consider the occasional leaking valve cover gasket, they have leaked the last couple of years on the 800ST and they occasionally leak on the current models. Some production items are tough to fix and take a least a couple of years. And I haven't been following it too closely, but the problems that seem to be out there might be blown a little out of perspective, the internet forums have a way of doing that as the people that post to a topic are the ones having the problems and even it is only a few of them, it seems like a majority because the ones with no problems are not writing or are out riding:)

And the last point, when I set off on my journey I was really focussed on reliability as most people wisely have a fear of breaking down in the middle of nowhere. After a couple of continents and inevitable small issues on all the bikes I rode and all the bikes that rode with us, I became much less fearful of potentially breaking down. They seemed to happen to everyone, no matter what people rode and most times were pretty easily fixed. Initially we are looking for a bike to cover up all our fears and inadequacies, usually the bike doens't get any better we just overcome our fears, become a little better mechanics and learn to rely on ourselves more.

RTW Motorcycling screwed with this post 09-02-2008 at 06:58 PM
RTW Motorcycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2008, 06:34 PM   #110
TheCowboy
back in the saddle again
 
TheCowboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: The frozen tundra - Minny Sota
Oddometer: 605
The 800

Dropped by the local BMW dealer - it was IN!!! Ran home jumped into my Aerostich Roadcrafter and boots and bolted back to the shop. Sit on it for maybe 45 minutes making engine sounds and wiping the drool off the tank (well not the real tank - the place where a tank should be).

It was more beautiful than I expected. Gunbarrel grey and matte black. I thought the seat height would be an issue, but it is pretty much the same height as my DR650. I am an inch from flat-footing her.

My wife gave me the thumbs up... what more do I need??

I could be riding her by the weekend.... (the bike that is....)

Cowboy2
TheCowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2008, 07:11 PM   #111
Neubz
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Neubz's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee/Chicago
Oddometer: 153
This is a fantastic thread. I do have one question, which builds on your experiences on the KLR as well. A few years ago I took a KLR across the US and into South America. Obviously, I had the KLR fully loaded - panniers, trunk, random junk shoved into a dry bag and strapped down, etc. Three or four times in the states, when travelling at high speeds on the highways across the plains, I got hit by a gust of wind which forced the bike into an oscillating lean: left right left right, with the lean to such a degree at the extremes that I felt that the bike was about to go down. Eventually physics would work itself out, and I would resume on an upright, straight path. But it was terrifying. It never happened outside the US when we weren't in windy interstate condititions. But it was enough to make me consider never buying a bike with a similar weight/profile again.

Did this ever happen to you on your KLR? How about the 800gs?

Thanks. Again, thanks for all your thoughtful answers.
__________________
Nate

"The subframe bolts have sheared off? No, we don't have any replacements. Perhaps some chicken wire will do the job?"
Neubz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 10:06 AM   #112
AngryRed
Lost in Cyber Space
 
AngryRed's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Location: Vegas, yeah woo...
Oddometer: 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by RTW Motorcycling
Hi Gnostic,

...but in general for very long distance touring over mixed terrain or for aorund the world touring, this bike, in my opinion, will become the new gold standard to which all others will be compared.
Thanks. That is what I wanted to hear as long as it was coming from an objective rider. Getting more and more excited about the possibility of nabbing one for myself.
__________________
--------------------


2013 Super Tenere
AngryRed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 10:25 AM   #113
easyman05
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: May 2008
Oddometer: 152
Hi, RTW!

Thank you very much for the brilliant thread!
basing on your riding in Russia, what's your opinion on 800GS - would it be more suitable here than your ride then?
Or would you prefer a 1200GS here?
TIA
easyman05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 01:04 PM   #114
TheCowboy
back in the saddle again
 
TheCowboy's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: The frozen tundra - Minny Sota
Oddometer: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboy2
Dropped by the local BMW dealer - it was IN!!! Ran home jumped into my Aerostich Roadcrafter and boots and bolted back to the shop. Sit on it for maybe 45 minutes making engine sounds and wiping the drool off the tank (well not the real tank - the place where a tank should be).

It was more beautiful than I expected. Gunbarrel grey and matte black. I thought the seat height would be an issue, but it is pretty much the same height as my DR650. I am an inch from flat-footing her.

My wife gave me the thumbs up... what more do I need??

I could be riding her by the weekend.... (the bike that is....)

Cowboy2
Bought it today, hope I don't have any of these "stalling" problems I been reading about lately...

Cowboy2
TheCowboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 06:07 PM   #115
RTW Motorcycling OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: B.C.
Oddometer: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboy2
Bought it today, hope I don't have any of these "stalling" problems I been reading about lately...

Cowboy2
Ride 'em Cowboy. I wouldn't worry too much about the stalling issue, can't imagine that the problem is that prevalent, you'll know fairly quick if it is.

Have fun on your new bike.
RTW Motorcycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 06:27 PM   #116
RTW Motorcycling OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: B.C.
Oddometer: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by easyman05
Hi, RTW!

Thank you very much for the brilliant thread!
basing on your riding in Russia, what's your opinion on 800GS - would it be more suitable here than your ride then?
Or would you prefer a 1200GS here?
TIA
Hey EasyMan,

Good question, riding in Russia has it's own unique challenges. It ultimately depends on where and what you like to ride, but in general I found the road conditions to be pretty variable and being from a cold climate I can understand why with the cold/warm fluctuations creating a lot of frost heaves and generally playing havoc with the roads.

You would be in the right class of bikes picking an adventure touring bike rather than say a sport bike, but between the two GS's depends a lot on you. The tradeoff for me would be that the Russian countryside has an amazing amount of terrain to explore so if you enjoy that, go with the smaller, better off road 800. But it is also so vast that you can be riding some loooong distances if you want to. Those long distances are easier on a bigger bike.

In the end though, I'd have to say though that the 800 will allow you to get to some amazing riding that most countries can only imagine (and on roads that cars have nightmares about). And it is good enough for most long distance, highway riding. So I would go with the 800, unless you plan on doing almost excusively freeway riding.

Hope that helps.
RTW Motorcycling is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 07:12 PM   #117
FOREVER HANDSOME
Gnarly Adventurer
 
FOREVER HANDSOME's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: North Vancouver, Canada's Tropics
Oddometer: 245
RTW, add me to those who are loving this thread and your thorough and articulate way of relaying your experience. Question, how did you snag this bike here in Vancouver? I've been checking at Pacific Yamaha and it may be December before they get any. I may also take you up on your offer of coming to meet you and have a look at the bike - I have a 1200 but have been thinking that it would be good to have a dedicated road bike (I miss my RT, sniff. . .) and a nice back - country/ commuter.
If you are open to me dropping over for a half hour to have a look at the beast, I would be more than appreciative.
Handsome
FOREVER HANDSOME is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 07:21 PM   #118
Toadride
Studly Adventurer
 
Toadride's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Done Roamin/Now Homin.
Oddometer: 826
Puke

Quote:
Originally Posted by FOREVER HANDSOME
RTW, add me to those who are loving this thread and your thorough and articulate way of relaying your experience. Question, how did you snag this bike here in Vancouver? I've been checking at Pacific Yamaha and it may be December before they get any. I may also take you up on your offer of coming to meet you and have a look at the bike - I have a 1200 but have been thinking that it would be good to have a dedicated road bike (I miss my RT, sniff. . .) and a nice back - country/ commuter.
If you are open to me dropping over for a half hour to have a look at the beast, I would be more than appreciative.
Handsome
Someone hasnt read the whole thread. Bought in South Africa.
Toadride is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 08:42 PM   #119
Bluebull2007
Adventurer
 
Bluebull2007's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Lima, Perú
Oddometer: 5,018
RTW, excellent comments, thanks. I also have an 800GS I have to say I agree with everything you said. I find it fantastic on dirt, very easy to ride.

The only other extra in catorgary (5) is hand protectors that I think you might not have mentioned.

I have also ridden the new 650GS quite bit and found it lacking a lot more off road - that smaller front tyre does make it harder. The 650 runs faster than the 800 too, but the torque is less in the lower revs. The throttle is also less senstive. Otherwise the bikes are almost identical and have no problems in keeping up with one another. I would go for the 650 if I did less dirt road, and wanted a smaller bike than the 1200.
Bluebull2007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2008, 09:00 PM   #120
FOREVER HANDSOME
Gnarly Adventurer
 
FOREVER HANDSOME's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Location: North Vancouver, Canada's Tropics
Oddometer: 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toadride
Someone hasnt read the whole thread. Bought in South Africa.
That's why I got people like you to steer me in the right direction
thanks
FOREVER HANDSOME is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014