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Old 02-21-2009, 05:42 PM   #6481
icekube1
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Location: Can'tberra, Australia
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[quote=showkey]14.5 volt charge is not too high. A fully charged battery will be 12.8 volts. The charging system needs to above that value. Real problems from charge rate start 14.7 and 15 can cause big problems fast.

Link to the charge light warning system I use:

http://www.customdynamics.com/LED_ba...anel_Mount_LED


Charging System Test from Yuasa
  • Adjust voltmeter to DC volts (20 volt range).
  • Place voltmeter leads to the battery terminals. (positive to positive and negative to negative)
  • Start your motorcycle.
  • Bring engine RPM's up to approximately 3,000
  • Compare the voltage reading to the specification in your owner's manual.
    (Note: the voltage reading should be approx. 14.0 - 14.5 volts to properly charge an AGM battery.)
I to am going to switch to a sealed battery. Not all sealed batteries are dry cell. Odyssey batteries are true dry cell but best I can find they do not make a size suitable for the TA. Odyseey batteries are big $$$. I think most of the sealed batteries are AGM absorbed glass mat so the liquid is absorbed but not dry. I was thinking the Yuasa YTX145AH-BS switch is same size and type as the posted pics of the DEKA.

From a battery manufactures web site:

When should I add water to my batteries?

How often you use and recharge your batteries will determine the frequency of watering. Also, using batteries in a hot climate will require more frequent watering. It is best to check your battery water level frequently and add distilled water when needed.

/quote]

Showkey, Ladder, Ravel,

Thanks for the great responses.

As advised in previous post, I had done the voltage ckeck and am getting 14.5v @ 5K rpm, which is right on spec according to my book. I is also the rev point for 100km/hr, the legal speed limit here.

From one of the above posts, I now have an idea why a fan on the reg/rec may be a good idea after all. Given that it can be a wee bit warm here, efficient dissipation of heat from the reg. may reduce some of the "excess" voltage to the battery.

And yes, the big cleanup sounds like a good idea too; something add to my list of jobs for the upcoming annual mod/maintain/repair phase.

seems like placement of the battery & reg, right next to the exhaust might, under a cover that limits airflow, not be the greatest idea.

Cheers

mike
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icekube1 screwed with this post 03-03-2009 at 03:04 AM
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Old 02-22-2009, 01:54 AM   #6482
ravelv
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Heat on regulator is due to reason that semiconductors also have some resistance and thus drops voltage and release heat. If regulator is designed properly, cooling down should not change anything in it's work- schematic solution should be thermal stable in some temperature range usually it works.
Cooling down can only extend it's working life, because higher working temperature shortens semidonductor's life.



Quote:
Originally Posted by icekube1
Showkey, Ladder, Ravel

Comments re dissipation of heat via regulator do explain the reason some have installed a fan. This may be a worthwhile avenue for me to explore, given that it can be a wee bit warm here. Logic seems to suggest that if I can dissipate excess heat off the regulator heat sink more effectively, then this might divert some "excess" voltage away from the batt.

Mike
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:23 AM   #6483
showkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by icekube1
Showkey, Ladder, Ravel

Great posts guys, thanks. As per earlier, I had done the output check and am getting 14.5v @5k rpm. This is bang in the middel of the spec range (at least accprding to my book)

Mike
I think your OK with 14.5..........Yuasa states in there sales information that their Yumicron CX uses 1/8 the service water as a conventional battery they claim this low water use is due battery plate chemistry..........so one could guess the brand/quality/construction could play a part in water use?????

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Old 02-22-2009, 02:25 PM   #6484
locorider
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A late sunday ride..

Some pics of today's ride...




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Old 02-22-2009, 07:32 PM   #6485
WeeBee
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Glad you got a chance to ride, Carlos. It's been solid rain all day here
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Old 02-22-2009, 09:51 PM   #6486
Andy G
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Quote:
Originally Posted by icekube1

As advised in previous post, I had done the voltage ckeck and am getting 15.5v @ 5K rpm, which is right on spec according to my book. I is also the rev point for 100km/hr, the legal speed limit here.
Maybe I read something wrong in here, but more than 14.7V is defenitely too much and means that most likely the regulator is toasted. It's more or less a common problem on ATs and TAs. Mainly caused by bad connectors, esp. the one between the alternator and the rectifier / regulator (3 yellow cables).

Cheers, Andy
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Old 02-23-2009, 05:08 AM   #6487
locorider
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Thanks, Dave! Hope you can get out and ride soon! I know its been a cold an long winter...

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCalDave
Glad you got a chance to ride, Carlos. It's been solid rain all day here
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Old 02-23-2009, 08:06 AM   #6488
debaisley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106

Also, I've always taken the time to sand away the paint between the regulator mounting bolts and the frame on all my bikes. I'm trying to improve the heat transfer between the regulator and the frame (whick is a much larger heat-sink).
You could also take this a step further , and apply some thermal grease , like the stuff that is used when hooking up a heatsink to the CPU when building a computer.
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Old 02-23-2009, 09:09 AM   #6489
WeeBee
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While it sounds like a good idea in theory, Thermal Transfer compounds are only really effective if the mounting surfaces on both the item you wish to transfer heat from and the item to transfer to are machined so that they are nearly perfectly flat.

If the surfaces are not machined flat or are warped, the Thermal Transfer compound will not help much at all. One might think, "I'll just put a thicker layer on to insure contact between the two surface's", but a thick layer will not help and actually may make heat transfer less effective.

I learned this during the research process involved in building my first computer.
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Old 02-23-2009, 10:33 AM   #6490
thetourist
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Any info on di-electric grease?
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Old 02-23-2009, 11:57 AM   #6491
WeeBee
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The primary purposes of dielectric grease is to keep out moisture, and
prevent corrosion. Silicone grease or dielectric grease was used back in the fifties as an aid to improve heat transfer in electronics applications but is nowhere near as effective as the best modern-day heat transfer compounds.
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Old 02-23-2009, 03:44 PM   #6492
Shandy
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A little ride on Sunday too!

Had great ride Sunday...cold but doable! A few pics.





I also had a bad case of STUPID!! No damage and bitch to get up!

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Old 02-23-2009, 04:10 PM   #6493
locorider
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Great pics

Those are great pictures Shandy! Sorry for the falling...yea it is really difficult to lift the beast. Mine is even more difficult with that big almost 7 gal tank....uuffff. But with all that ice it should be harder to lift.

Keep it comming...
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Old 02-23-2009, 04:17 PM   #6494
locorider
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Grease

My bike was experiencing difficulties with the signal lights. I changed one of the front bulbs because it didn't look good at the center contact point. The problem continued and I thought about changing the flashing relay. Then decided to disassemble the signal switch, cleaned it and added dielectric grease and voilá...it is working fine!!!!

Simple solution....
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Old 02-23-2009, 08:16 PM   #6495
Michelangelo
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Need help on measuring stock TA front end height.

I'm going to be putting on an XR650R front end on my stock rear end transalp. So until I get a longer shock I want the XRR forks to be at the same height as what the stock TA is. My problem is I already disassembled my TA stock front end.

So I hope somebody would be willing to give me a static measurement of their front end. I was thinking the most uniform way would be to measure the bike unladen, on a flat surface being balanced in an upright position with a measurement from the bottom of the front headstock portion of the frame to the ground directly below that straight up and down.

I figure that will get me close enough to set the XRR forks the same height. If you have a better idea please chime in.
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