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Old 02-28-2012, 07:40 PM   #12931
cnf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Which likely means that the suspension pivots were NOT maintained. This is a very time consuming job and would be very expensive at normal shop rates.
I think you are right

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Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
You want grease for "zero rpm" bearings. Any #0 or #1 grease will work. Too heavy is bad. Lotsa guys make the mistake of thinking that thicker and heavier is better here. Since these bearings never make a full circle ("zero rpm") you want a grease that is light enough to flow back around the rollers after the bearing moves. This heavy stuff gets shoved out of the way by the roller and never comes back. Then the roller runs dry and rusts.

I had to have an old mechanic explain this to me. I was finding rusty bad bearings that still had grease inside......problem was that the grease was too thick.
Ah, things like that never occurred to me…

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Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Things to consider:

A motorcycle jack or stand makes this job much easier and safer.

Normal tools will work fine. I'm talking real tools like wrenches, sockets etc. It's not a crescent-wrench-and-pliers job. The tool kit that comes with the bike is mostly useless.
I am, sadly, rather limited in tools atm. I have no jack, just the center stand. I have a tool kit I am working on for the bike, and new tools get bought as I need them. I also have some old sockets etc in an inherited tool box :P

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Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Never tap or hammer on the threaded end of a bolt or pivot shaft.....put the nut back on loosely and tap on that. If you have to hit it hard, use a piece of wood between the hammer and the bolt or use heat to free it

The roller bearings inside these pivots are LOOSE. The only thing holding them inside the bearing is the grease and the inner bearing race. Don't use compressed air to clean them or you'll have rollers flying all over the shop.

This is a good weekend long project if you take your time and do it right. Clean and relube as you go. The rollers can be removed from the outer race with a dental pick or similar tool. The race gets cleaned, the rollers get cleaned, everything gets fresh grease and then the fun starts.

You get to place each roller back inside the greased outer race and line them all up. Use enough grease to hold the rollers in place the excess will get pushed out when you put the inner race back inside.

Do ONE bearing at a time.

There are, if memory serves, 6 bearings to be done. Due to the design, grease fittings will not work to make this job easier.
Hmm… I think this will be a project for some other time. The bike is my only mode of transportation, and as I live in the city, I have to drive to a friends house who has a garage to do the maintenance… I'll stick to sprockets and chains this time.

But now that you have explained it a bit, I do think i'll plan it for the summer and take my time with it.

I'm still trying to get used to the idea of using a master link instead of an endless chain...

Thanks a lot for your input so far!
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Old 02-28-2012, 08:18 PM   #12932
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Forgot you guys were blessed with the center stand.

This will certainly work. You just have to kneel down a bit farther than with a raised work stand.

If we were ridding around with 100+ horsepower a riveted link would likely be necessary. With the TAs power the clipped M/L does just fine. If you're really worried you can replace the M/L every 6 thousand kilometers or so.
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Old 02-28-2012, 08:24 PM   #12933
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Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Forgot you guys were blessed with the center stand.

This will certainly work. You just have to kneel down a bit farther than with a raised work stand.

If we were ridding around with 100+ horsepower a riveted link would likely be necessary. With the TAs power the clipped M/L does just fine. If you're really worried you can replace the M/L every 6 thousand kilometers or so.
Yep, I do like my center stand :P

Sweet, gonna call honda in the morning, and order me a pair of sprockets and a chain (I hope to get a gold colored one, to match the rims! (and some spark plugs, an oil filter, air filter etc )

Thanks Ladder!

I'll try and take some pictures and document the process. I'm also putting up a list of specs and part numbers etc for the TA on my site.
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Old 02-29-2012, 02:33 AM   #12934
herrstedt
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Ancient insect

Hi there

Had my cowl and seat off my TA 700 and thought it looked like an insect

[IMG]
_DSC1248.jpg by HrStedt, on Flickr[/IMG]
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Old 02-29-2012, 04:12 AM   #12935
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Yup!

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Old 02-29-2012, 05:50 AM   #12936
mas335
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Of all the Transalps I have serviced or restored I have never seen the shock linkage serviced due to neglect. The seals are small and not very well protected from the outside elements. Neglected they can look like this image.

If you decide to properly service the swingarm and shock linkage bearings here are a few things that may help.

1) Lift the rear wheel off the ground to unload linkage stress

2) Loosen and remove the swingarm to frame shaft bolt nut. With a soft metal rod (aluminum) that is smaller in diameter than the shaft diameter, place it against the threaded end of the shaft and hit it with a hammer, all you are trying to do is make sure it will move at all, 1/2" is plenty. I have seen them completely rusted inside the bushing sleeves making the swingarm remove impossible which ends the idea of servicing the swingarm bearings but you can still service the linkage bearings.

3) Loosen all of the linkage bearing bolt nuts before dismantling the swingarm, it will be much easier than trying to do this once the swingarm has been removed due to their torque values and the swingarm moving around.

4) Including the swingarm bearings there are a total of 11 bearings. 4 in the swingarm and 7 in the linkage assembly, all are the same size.

5) On rare occurances I have seen some Transalps with "caged" needle bearings which means you can not remove the roller needles and just clean them as best as you can. The caged bearings also have about half as many needle bearings as the full needle bearing.

6) Per Honda, a 40% Molybdenum Disulfide( MoS2) rated grease is recommended, anything higher than the 40% is fine.



There is only one way to properly clean and grease them......

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Old 02-29-2012, 06:33 AM   #12937
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TY Mas, I'll be taking notes, and I'll make a project out of it this summer!
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Old 02-29-2012, 10:52 AM   #12938
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BTW, I am collecting what I know and learn of my TA on my website: http://frank.rosquin.net/transalp/. If anyone has any suggestions or additions, I'd be happy to adjust.

cnf screwed with this post 02-29-2012 at 04:05 PM
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Old 02-29-2012, 11:30 AM   #12939
thetourist
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Originally Posted by mas335 View Post
2) Loosen and remove the swingarm to frame shaft bolt nut. With a soft metal rod (aluminum) that is smaller in diameter than the shaft diameter, place it against the threaded end of the shaft and hit it with a hammer, all you are trying to do is make sure it will move at all, 1/2" is plenty. I have seen them completely rusted inside the bushing sleeves making the swingarm remove impossible which ends the idea of servicing the swingarm bearings but you can still service the linkage bearings.
How would you get the shaft out if it is seized? I have another old bike on which I cannot remove the swingarm.
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Old 02-29-2012, 12:52 PM   #12940
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Exactly what i had in mind
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Old 02-29-2012, 02:06 PM   #12941
mas335
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How would you get the shaft out if it is seized? I have another old bike on which I cannot remove the swingarm.
I am sure you will get all kinds of suggestions but there is a point where you may just have to give up.

IF you have tried all possible chemicals that claim they can loosen anything and have soaked the area and let it sit for days and days and are completely convinced it just won't budge then you are just stuck with it.

If you want to throw heat on it and risk the consequences then you can go that route. Given that the shaft is inside a bushing which is inside a swingarm I doubt heat will accomplish much plus the heat will not do the bushings, the needle bearings or the seals any good.

It really depends on just how severe the rusting is and you never know from just looking at it.

Check this out......... There is no substitute for proper routine service to prevent stuff like this from happening.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=532835
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mas335 screwed with this post 02-29-2012 at 02:15 PM
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Old 02-29-2012, 02:52 PM   #12942
dfc
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Argentine CDI boxes

I remember a few people had purchased the Argentine CDI boxes, any long term updates on quality?

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Old 02-29-2012, 03:00 PM   #12943
mas335
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I remember a few people had purchased the Argentine CDI boxes, any long term updates on quality?

I can't tell a bit of difference. Had them for about a year.
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Old 02-29-2012, 04:57 PM   #12944
dfc
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I can't tell a bit of difference. Had them for about a year.
Good to hear, thanks
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Old 02-29-2012, 07:17 PM   #12945
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I
Check this out......... There is no substitute for proper routine service to prevent stuff like this from happening.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=532835

In fact I was thinking about the sawzall method. It is an old Bultaco and I may just leave it.
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