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Old 05-03-2012, 09:18 AM   #13216
Ladder106
It's a short cut, really
 
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Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Davis, CA
Oddometer: 4,900
Welcome,

We'll happily assist you spending your money on the TA..

How about putting the air box where the tank is and building a tank under the seat, then building nice Dakar styled fairing around the whole thing with molds so you can sell copies to the rest of us.

....just as a start.

Retired guys need projects.........also don't hide your other bikes.
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Old 05-04-2012, 08:17 AM   #13217
layzrider
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Are you talking to me?

Doing anytime really advanced is not possible. I had a bunch of ideas before I got the bike but once I did, reallity steped in. I am struggling just to get the bike into running condition. I do have a target date of 3 weeks from now. There is a ride coming up. I am truly impressed by the work being done by others, way more than I can do. I bought some aluminum for side covers and radiator guards. Forming these could be a real challange.
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Old 05-04-2012, 08:29 AM   #13218
Ladder106
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Yep.

Sally forth....we're right behind you.
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Old 05-06-2012, 08:29 AM   #13219
Douf
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Location: Close to Cumming (GA that is)
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No mods yet

One week of ownership, it's getting stripped down and cleaned/serviced. After reading through the first 100 pages of this thread, the only 'must-do' alteration - from a reliability standpoint - appears to be the CDI box re-orient. Before reassembly, it's probably worth asking if there are any other Transalp doo-hickey's that need attention?



First night home - meet the family.



Pampered.



Needs changing - right?



Prep'd and ready for surgery

Thanks,

Douf
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Old 05-06-2012, 09:11 AM   #13220
Ladder106
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Location: Davis, CA
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I wonder what's under here???

Hi Douf,

Oh you're going to fit right in. Buy a bike....first thing...take it apart.

Drives my wife nuts. I even do it with a (very rare for me) showroom new bike.

What color is it? Hard to tell from your first photo.

The CDI boxes ARE the "do-hickey" for the TA and at least you don't have to take half the engine apart to fix them. Changing the position can help but they seem to have about a 25000 mile life before they get cranky.

Rule is...carry a spare. If you're on a long trip, carry two. Anytime the bike starts running on one cylinder or miss-firing look there first. Good thing is, they are easy to change and only as big as a pack of Camels (that's cigarettes not dromedaries for you younger guys).

Careful with the tank mounting rubber doughnuts on the frame. They seem like then want to stay there but then disappear like magic when your standing there with the tank in your hands fitting it back onto the frame and are certain to be found in the most inaccessible part of your shop.

The little brass "nut-certs" in the front fairing get real friendly with the screws and will spin inside the plastic when removing the screws. Since you've already fought this battle, you just have to be careful to secure them back inside the plasic fairing before reattaching the front. Go easy on the torque here and a dab of "anti-seize" on the screws helps a bunch later on.

Take a very close look at the air tube going from the airbox to the carbs. The rear tube is attached to the main tube between the frame with a sealant that sometimes cracks due to age and heat and lets air bypass the system. Slathering more silicone on it seem to work pretty well. Also every PO is not too skilled at getting that rear tube to seal well onto the carb and you may find an air leak or gap at that point it they have removed this tube in the past. If you yank the tube and getting it back together is driving you nuts, repost here and we can talk you through the "procedure" for doing this easily. This post is getting too long already.

Carb syncing is done with the tank off. The adjustment screw (#2 phillips) is found by looking through the hole in the middle of the air tube. You need a balancing manometer and an aux. fuel source. The screw is veeerrrry sensitive to changes so don't start randomly turning it a bunch.

You've already got the larger front brake but a braided line will help a bit more. Watch the rear spring depending on your weight and the load you want to carry. If your rear sag (with you on the bike - loaded) gets to be more than 2.5 inches or so you may get a slow wobble above 70 or 75. The rear springs get tired after 20 years. From the photos, it looks like there is a lot of rear sag even with all the plastic taken off. Serious off-roading will lead you to a progression of suspension mods and a replacement rear shock is the only thing that will get the TA close to the handling of that big orange bike in your garage. The bars are rubber mounted in the top triple.....some guys like it, some find the response too vague and replace the rubber with aluminium cones (See Jim Rowley).

Watch chain tension. Lots of people set this up way too tight. There's about 7 in of travel in the rear so tension has to be more like a dirt bike than a street bike. Too tight and the transmission output splines at the CS sprocket get hammered. Give this a quick look and a clean and dab of grease before final assembly.

The rest is just details to give the bike a personalized fit

Ladder106 screwed with this post 05-06-2012 at 09:28 AM
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Old 05-06-2012, 09:12 AM   #13221
2bold2getold
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Douf View Post
One week of ownership, it's getting stripped down and cleaned/serviced. After reading through the first 100 pages of this thread, the only 'must-do' alteration - from a reliability standpoint - appears to be the CDI box re-orient. Before reassembly, it's probably worth asking if there are any other Transalp doo-hickey's that need attention?

Douf
The pros need to jump in here. But, I'm new here also and have just gone through some of this, and sense you have it apart, here's my list: adjust valves, sync carbs, clean wire connectors, add extra fuse/relay/connectors for accessories etc, check/replace carb vent mini air filter elements. Mine had a blockage in the carb vent hose that goes to the air box, and didn't run right (paper wasp, I think) Once you start this there's really no place to stop. It's an old bike and yours looks mostly unmolested, so you've got a good start. Good luck, and ask if you get stumped, these guys have really got this thing figured out.

2bold2getold screwed with this post 05-06-2012 at 09:56 AM
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Old 05-06-2012, 10:24 AM   #13222
Douf
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Joined: Feb 2006
Location: Close to Cumming (GA that is)
Oddometer: 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Hi Douf,

Oh you're going to fit right in. Buy a bike....first thing...take it apart.

Drives my wife nuts. I even do it with a (very rare for me) showroom new bike.

To be honest the motivation to buy it was mainly to get something to tinker with. Basically it looks as though it's been well taken care of, but has obviously been off road and has the usual collection of minor superficial blemishes on the bodywork.

What color is it? Hard to tell from your first photo.

It's the bronze color (Moonstone maybe?)


The CDI boxes ARE the "do-hickey" for the TA and at least you don't have to take half the engine apart to fix them. Changing the position can help but they seem to have about a 25000 mile life before they get cranky.

Rule is...carry a spare. If you're on a long trip, carry two. Anytime the bike starts running on one cylinder or miss-firing look there first. Good thing is, they are easy to change and only as big as a pack of Camels (that's cigarettes not dromedaries for you younger guys).

Compared to the do-hickey on the KLR and the KTM's water-pump/fuel pump/clutch salve 'wear items' this one sounds like a model of reliability/simplicity.

Careful with the tank mounting rubber doughnuts on the frame. They seem like then want to stay there but then disappear like magic when your standing there with the tank in your hands fitting it back onto the frame and are certain to be found in the most inaccessible part of your shop.

They all do that

The little brass "nut-certs" in the front fairing get real friendly with the screws and will spin inside the plastic when removing the screws. Since you've already fought this battle, you just have to be careful to secure them back inside the plasic fairing before reattaching the front. Go easy on the torque here and a dab of "anti-seize" on the screws helps a bunch later on.

No issues there on diss-assembly - there is some evidence of anti-seize usage by PO thankfully

Take a very close look at the air tube going from the airbox to the carbs. The rear tube is attached to the main tube between the frame with a sealant that sometimes cracks due to age and heat and lets air bypass the system. Slathering more silicone on it seem to work pretty well. Also every PO is not too skilled at getting that rear tube to seal well onto the carb and you may find an air leak or gap at that point it they have removed this tube in the past. If you yank the tube and getting it back together is driving you nuts, repost here and we can talk you through the "procedure" for doing this easily. This post is getting too long already.

10-4. Sounds similar to the KTM - apparently in that case, it was simply a case of not holding my tongue at the correct angle during re-assembly

Carb syncing is done with the tank off. The adjustment screw (#2 phillips) is found by looking through the hole in the middle of the air tube. You need a balancing manometer and an aux. fuel source. The screw is veeerrrry sensitive to changes so don't start randomly turning it a bunch.

Have all the tools - fwiw the aux source is a lawnmower tank that a repair shop donated for free. Did a buddy's 750 Shadow recently - assume the motor is pretty similar?

You've already got the larger front brake but a braided line will help a bit more. Watch the rear spring depending on your weight and the load you want to carry. If your rear sag (with you on the bike - loaded) gets to be more than 2.5 inches or so you may get a slow wobble above 70 or 75. The rear springs get tired after 20 years. From the photos, it looks like there is a lot of rear sag even with all the plastic taken off. Serious off-roading will lead you to a progression of suspension mods and a replacement rear shock is the only thing that will get the TA close to the handling of that big orange bike in your garage. The bars are rubber mounted in the top triple.....some guys like it, some find the response too vague and replace the rubber with aluminium cones (See Jim Rowley).

It does feel pretty low at the rear. Something to look it. That being said, the (what I assume is) reasonably stock package, goes, stops and handles much better than a stock KLR.


Watch chain tension. Lots of people set this up way too tight. There's about 7 in of travel in the rear so tension has to be more like a dirt bike than a street bike. Too tight and the transmission output splines at the CS sprocket get hammered. Give this a quick look and a clean and dab of grease before final assembly.

Thanks for the tip - the tension looks a bit 'street-bike' currently.


The rest is just details to give the bike a personalized fit
Many thanks for the feedback.

Douf
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Old 05-06-2012, 10:33 AM   #13223
Douf
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Location: Close to Cumming (GA that is)
Oddometer: 770
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2bold2getold View Post
The pros need to jump in here. But, I'm new here also and have just gone through some of this, and sense you have it apart, here's my list: adjust valves, sync carbs, clean wire connectors, add extra fuse/relay/connectors for accessories etc, check/replace carb vent mini air filter elements. Mine had a blockage in the carb vent hose that goes to the air box, and didn't run right (paper wasp, I think) Once you start this there's really no place to stop. It's an old bike and yours looks mostly unmolested, so you've got a good start. Good luck, and ask if you get stumped, these guys have really got this thing figured out.
Yeah, a thorough service was the basic plan. Intending to lube the suspension linkages and service the forks too.
Judging by the extra harware on the bike, it looks as though the PO has already installed wiring for additional outlets and maybe an aftermarket horn (neither was installed though). It also has a battery tender pigtail and heated grips.

Douf
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Old 05-06-2012, 12:25 PM   #13224
wide
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Originally Posted by Ladder106 View Post
Hi Douf,


Take a very close look at the air tube going from the airbox to the carbs. The rear tube is attached to the main tube between the frame with a sealant that sometimes cracks due to age and heat and lets air bypass the system. Slathering more silicone on it seem to work pretty well. Also every PO is not too skilled at getting that rear tube to seal well onto the carb and you may find an air leak or gap at that point it they have removed this tube in the past. If you yank the tube and getting it back together is driving you nuts, repost here and we can talk you through the "procedure" for doing this easily. This post is getting too long already.
You couldnt put a pic up to show where you mean... for someone who's dull
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Old 05-06-2012, 01:13 PM   #13225
Ladder106
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Joined: Jan 2005
Location: Davis, CA
Oddometer: 4,900
I don't have any stock photos of this. Mark may be able to help here.

If you remove the air tube, it will be obvious when you look at the underside. One carb has the air tube molded to fit onto the rubber connector. The other has another piece attached and then sealed to the main air tube. It was likely a molding problem that they solved in that way.

On removal you can plainly see the sealant....then its just a matter of checking if it's cracked and leaking or not.
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Old 05-06-2012, 03:26 PM   #13226
Santa
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I'm finding myself in need of a GIVI monokey left side pannier mount (wingrack) for the 89 TA.
Anybody got one they would like to part with?

Its heartwarming to see the continued interest in the TA.
Hello to all...

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Old 05-06-2012, 04:35 PM   #13227
showkey
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Location: Wausau
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Douf View Post
One week of ownership, it's getting stripped down and cleaned/serviced. After reading through the first 100 pages of this thread, the only 'must-do' alteration - from a reliability standpoint - appears to be the CDI box re-orient. Before reassembly, it's probably worth asking if there are any other Transalp doo-hickey's that need attention?


Thanks,

Douf
One of my favorite mods is changing the pilot jets from stock #38 to # 40.

Night and day low end smooth running no lean studder, no 1500-2500 rpm lean surge at constant throttle and better cold start with little or no "choke". Some shim the needles up but I don't do that one. Main jets in stock form do not need mods under most conditions. The jet kits sold to get more power are not good thing.
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Old 05-07-2012, 01:19 AM   #13228
tgeliot
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Originally Posted by Douf View Post
One week of ownership, it's getting stripped down and cleaned/serviced. . . .
Douf
You are aware that it has four spark plugs, right?
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Old 05-07-2012, 09:28 AM   #13229
Douf
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Originally Posted by tgeliot View Post
You are aware that it has four spark plugs, right?
Hmmmm........it's also about the right age for trickle down oval piston technology from the NR, but I guess that's probably a bit much to ask

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Old 05-07-2012, 12:30 PM   #13230
Ladder106
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The oval-piston silliness never really worked out, did it?

Don't forget the aux. air filters as 2bold suggested.
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