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Old 09-25-2012, 09:17 PM   #13681
showkey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happyclam View Post
For starters...how am I supposed to catch up to this thread when you guys keep adding a page or 2 every time i check it out? Need more advice... Read some where changing to #40 slow jet is the way to go. My choke sucks and takes forever to warm up.Do most of you have the stock jetting? Thanks again. Jeff. Anybody looking for a vstrom?
40 slow jet will improve cold start, less "choke" is required, drivability both cold and hot improved, will not really cause the warm up to be faster but drivabilty during warm up will be better. If you do the pilot jets, while your there choke cables may need attention both opening and closing completely is important.

If the temp gauge is slow move up during cool weather that could be normal, if the gauge is OK the thermostat controls warm up. The temp gauge is an indicator not thermometer
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Old 09-26-2012, 03:36 AM   #13682
mas335
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You have done so much work on your bike that I just assumed you are highly experienced, the details always make the difference. The shop manual is not much help, it doesn't have much to say about these rubber seals and the sleeve ( page 15-10) .

1) Spray the rubber dust seals with wd-40 so they will slide better
2) Slide the floating sleeve to one side
3) without puncturing the seal use something very small like like a dental tool or a very small scribe tool and try to get it under the rubber end lip. The collar sleeve has a machined recess that the rubber lip fits into. Once you get the tool under the end try to move the tool around to free the rest of the rubber seal from around the sleeve.
4) Now push the sleeve a little more to free this side and before you go any further do the other end to.
5) Once both sides are free you can then push the sleeve all the way out.
6) The rubber seals also have a rib on the inside end which fits into groove machined inside the caliper body, Squeeze the rubber seal to collapse the end rib and you should be able to remove it.
7) If rust has formed on the sleeve it must be cleaned off, same with the inside of the bore where the sleeve fits but there should not be any rust in there.
8) Order new rubber seals if you damage them, they are cheap and still available. Don't try using a substitute, these seals are thin, soft, and very flexable and need to fit good, once you install th cleaned sleeve make sure they easily float like a accordian bellow.

This has problably been the problem all along, especially if it didn't float at all, I think you are on the right track.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:37 AM   #13683
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Originally Posted by mas335 View Post
this has problably been the problem all along, especially if it didn't float at all, i think you are on the right track.
+10 ^^^^^^^^^^^
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Old 09-26-2012, 12:42 PM   #13684
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Persistence

Nice work fellas !!

You guys all teamed up on a problem and (I believe) finally got it solved.

That's the way this thread has been working all along...those that don't know (like me) just kinda stay out of it .... lurk and learn. The guys with the experience throw ideas at it. The guy with the problem puts in some time,effort and throws us photos on problems and solutions.

Eventually it's fixed and we all learn something new.

Well Done !
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Old 09-26-2012, 08:28 PM   #13685
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Quote:
Originally Posted by showkey View Post
40 slow jet will improve cold start, less "choke" is required, drivability both cold and hot improved, will not really cause the warm up to be faster but drivabilty during warm up will be better. If you do the pilot jets, while your there choke cables may need attention both opening and closing completely is important.

If the temp gauge is slow move up during cool weather that could be normal, if the gauge is OK the thermostat controls warm up. The temp gauge is an indicator not thermometer
Thanks Showkey, I think i'll make the swap....the choke was definately stuck for some time when i got her.I used a dremel with a polishing adapter to clean her up..seemed to work, but i'll look closer next time.
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Old 09-26-2012, 08:55 PM   #13686
Belgian Waffles
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Well well, look what we have here...

Aha!



So this must be the little gremlin I've been chasing intermittently for almost two years now (when I was home, anyway). I was so convinced the issue was directly linked to crash damage from my off that I completely overlooked what was staring at me in the face the whole time from behind it's little rubber boot.

Time to polish it up and fix this once and for all.

Thanks again for everyone's help. I should have found this a long time ago, but the positive side (since there always is one) is that I learned a hell of a lot about the front end of my machine! This is one lesson that will stick and I sure know where to troubleshoot first next time this kind of thing comes up down the road.

(Sorry again for picture quality, my phone camera is all I have and even it gives me problems with file format. Luckily the damage is so great it's obvious despite the crumby image.)
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:42 AM   #13687
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BW, It looks exactly as it should to confirm the problem source. I have never seen one so rusted but properly cleaned up, greased and with good new seals it will work just fine. I have seen caliper cups look almost this badly pitted.

Your images helped everyone understand what you were seeing which was a huge help.
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mas335 screwed with this post 09-27-2012 at 04:09 AM
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Old 09-27-2012, 09:51 AM   #13688
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Originally Posted by Belgian Waffles View Post
Aha!



)

If the caliper slide pins are that bad.................you might want to look at the rear suspension link bearings/seals, swing arm bearings and all the wheel bearings for similar damage (if not already addressed prior)
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Old 09-27-2012, 11:36 AM   #13689
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+10 ^^^^^^^^^^

Image of a neglected shock linkage bearing.

I recently tried purchasing a shock linkage bearing sleeve and learned it is discontiuned. The seals are poor and the linkage is always in harms way, it's a big job to clean them all, 9 bearings total in the swingarm and shock linkage.

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Old 09-27-2012, 11:37 AM   #13690
Belgian Waffles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by showkey View Post
If the caliper slide pins are that bad.................you might want to look at the rear suspension link bearings/seals, swing arm bearings and all the wheel bearings for similar damage (if not already addressed prior)
I took the swingarm off a few thousand miles ago so I know that's in order for now, and no signs of wheel bearing damage at this point. I can identify that issue more easily though because I've done it on a different bike already. Also changed the steering bearings recently.

Thanks for the reminder
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Old 09-29-2012, 02:11 AM   #13691
wide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mas335 View Post
+10 ^^^^^^^^^^

Image of a neglected shock linkage bearing.

I recently tried purchasing a shock linkage bearing sleeve and learned it is discontiuned. The seals are poor and the linkage is always in harms way, it's a big job to clean them all, 9 bearings total in the swingarm and shock linkage.

Would have thought bearing kits are still available ???
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Old 09-29-2012, 03:35 AM   #13692
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Parts are disappearing from Honda USA's inventory due to age of the model. Showkey is the expert here on Honda inventory and policies, I secrectly think he is a Honda undercover engineer or something like that!

I miss spoke earlier, if you include the swingarm there are a total of 11 bearings, not 9. 7 identical bearings are in the linkage, a total of 4 are in the swingarm.

Seems I tried to order the bearings by their number through a bearing distibutor and was told they are not available in the US, I believe the same is true with the head set bearings and races which are probably still available through Honda, for some reason there are restrictions on bearing distribution?

As for the bearing sleeves or as Honda calls them, collars, some may still be available but the one I needed was discontinued. Honda never sold these bearings and collars as a "kit", you have to buy them separately.
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Old 09-29-2012, 06:11 AM   #13693
showkey
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Originally Posted by mas335 View Post
Seems I tried to order the bearings by their number through a bearing distibutor and was told they are not available in the US, I believe the same is true with the head set bearings and races which are probably still available through Honda, for some reason there are restrictions on bearing distribution?
I ran into this bearing availability problem on a car alternator bearing a while back...........and the answer was if the manufacture specified a non-common (odd size, odd load spec, odd material spec etc) bearing usually for an engineering or size reason then the bearing distributors while not have the bearing. If it happens on steering head bearing it most likely is due to one of diameters or depth measurements is odd size.

Some parts are becoming more scarce..............On the bright side of parts I did order a new Honda CDI box after experiencing the dreaded failure (discussed many times on this forum) on a ride in New Mexiico. Dropping one cylinder intermittently the last 50 miles of the ride. Had a spare with me but the failure was intermittent enough not to do a trail side repair. The TA handled the trail and road sections with ease and in comfort.
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showkey screwed with this post 09-29-2012 at 07:01 AM
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Old 09-29-2012, 07:09 AM   #13694
Ladder106
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Quote:
I secrectly think he is a Honda undercover engineer or something

Hmmmmmmmm.............


..........he certainly has quite a few of those red bikes....and....he rather carefully neglected to mention your deductions in his last post.....



........Hmmmmmmmmm
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Old 09-29-2012, 07:54 AM   #13695
mas335
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secret agents are like that.



BW, Make sure the two pins that hold the pads in the caliper are nice and clean to, hit them with some steel wool.
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