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Old 04-26-2013, 07:29 AM   #14626
Hotmamaandme
Wishing I was riding RTW
 
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Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Gardnerville NV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Transalp1999 View Post
I just mounted Batanga Cases on my 1999. They are made in eastern Europe. I've been happy with them so far.

Mounting the rack was just simple and would easily accept other panniers
Great price thanks for that.


pic of cases
http://www.batangacase.com/?l=en&s=prepare
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Hotmamaandme screwed with this post 04-26-2013 at 07:35 AM
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Old 04-26-2013, 09:48 PM   #14627
DKCJ
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Thumb

Thank you very much 2bold2getold.
I will be ordering from David Silver. Prices are much better than cmsnl.
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Old 04-28-2013, 11:59 AM   #14628
Belgian Waffles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSPD750 View Post

A couple pics for you Ray. Can you see the 2 pipes 1 on each side attached to a black plastic filter thingy (r/h attached to fan shroud bracket and l/h attached to rad bracket) they in turn both go to what appears to be a crossover tube at the carbs? Underneath those plastic filter boxes is a hole in which you can see a foam element. Do earlier models have that or is that also a '96 feature.
89s have those too.
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Current: 1989 Honda Transalp, 2006 Scorpa TY125F trials
Past: 1999 KLR 650, 1990 Tengai 650
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Old 04-28-2013, 12:02 PM   #14629
Belgian Waffles
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Location: Green. Wet. Oregon.
Oddometer: 874
Brake light stuck

My brake light is stuck on. I've narrowed it down to the front brake lever switch:

The solenoid doesn't click with every pull. I already ground down the lever so it doesn't touch my handguards anymore, and made sure the two wires were well connected. However if I hit the front brake lever back out (release) it will sometimes trip the solenoid and the light will turn off (maybe once out of every 5-10 times that I hit it back out).

Is the solenoid toast? I've never heard of this before.

Thanks.

J
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Current: 1989 Honda Transalp, 2006 Scorpa TY125F trials
Past: 1999 KLR 650, 1990 Tengai 650
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Old 04-28-2013, 01:30 PM   #14630
mas335
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Try cleaning it. The best way is to remove the switch, turn it over and spray WD40 every where you can including around the trigger post. Press the switch trigger several times and see if that doesn't free up the internal parts.

One small screw is all that holds the switch in place. Make sure your brake lever isn't sticking, not sure why hitting the brake lever back out should have anything to do with the switch working right unless it is sticking.

You can do all this while the switch is on the bike but it's messy.
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Old 04-28-2013, 01:37 PM   #14631
Belgian Waffles
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mas335 View Post
The best way is to remove the switch,
Remove the switch by taking the front brake lever/master cylinder assembly apart? Or just off the handlebar?

Thanks
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Current: 1989 Honda Transalp, 2006 Scorpa TY125F trials
Past: 1999 KLR 650, 1990 Tengai 650
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Old 04-28-2013, 02:33 PM   #14632
R_Rick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgian Waffles View Post
Remove the switch by taking the front brake lever/master cylinder assembly apart? Or just off the handlebar?

Thanks
Just off the handlebars.
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Old 04-28-2013, 02:55 PM   #14633
mas335
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Remove the brake lever only, the master cylinder does not need to be removed from the bars. You will be working upside down but you can handle it, one small phillips screw will remove the switch.
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Old 04-28-2013, 03:28 PM   #14634
mas335
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parts in flea market

Just put a 16T counter shaft sprocket and a K&N in the FM.
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Old 04-28-2013, 04:33 PM   #14635
dualdogdave
Twin Power Rules!
 
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Joined: Jan 2007
Location: Santa Cruz Mountians
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Dual Dog Dave Checking In

Greetings All,



It has been awhile since I last logged in.


Over the past year I have been remodeling the garage.


All of the bikes have been in storage with no riding.......


So now I am going through each one of them, bringing them back into service.


I took TA #1 out this morning for a little run in the Coastal Mountains above Los Gatos, CA.






Good Ole #1 started right away after her hybernation and is performing
as good as when I got it back from a Lineaweaver dynotune.

She feels like all 44.3 bhp is still getting to the ground.







The exhaust with precision jetting is the single largest enhancement you can make to a TAs performance in stock spec.











I purchased this 583cc jewel new in July of 1989.


S/N# 353 makes this an early CA model release.


Lightly moded:


de-smogged
tuned
carbon exhaust
K&N
fat bars with risers
Pro Grip 737 grips (heated of coarse)
KTM mirrors
Deka glass matted battery
LED tail light
hella head lamp with HID
hella horns
bikini engine guard
MT-21s front and rear
rear disc brake and hub
pannier racks
Held tail bag









Looking forward to many more good miles with this faithful girl !







The TransHawk will be coming into service next stay tuned..





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Santa Cruz Coastal Mountains

"TransHawk" Dyno Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tA-y7nxL580

"TransHawk" Dyno Charts:
http://picasaweb.google.com/adv990/D...05658028913170

Transalps and other cool bikes spotted in my travels.
http://picasaweb.google.com/adv990/T...eat=directlink
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Old 04-28-2013, 06:52 PM   #14636
Belgian Waffles
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Joined: Jan 2008
Location: Green. Wet. Oregon.
Oddometer: 874
Quote:
Originally Posted by R_Rick View Post
Just off the handlebars.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mas335 View Post
Remove the brake lever only, the master cylinder does not need to be removed from the bars. You will be working upside down but you can handle it, one small phillips screw will remove the switch.
Thanks.
__________________
Always chase your dreams. Even if you don't catch them, you'll have a hell of a time trying.

Current: 1989 Honda Transalp, 2006 Scorpa TY125F trials
Past: 1999 KLR 650, 1990 Tengai 650
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Old 04-29-2013, 12:39 AM   #14637
raoulserban
vrrummm
 
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Location: Timisoara, Romania
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@dualdogdave- Can you please make some more photos of that bikini engine guard! look nice and i would make one for my Tranny
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Old 04-29-2013, 02:44 AM   #14638
Thunder Dan
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Joined: Sep 2008
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia
Oddometer: 740
Hey Guys & Gals,
Well after about 6 months of fooling around in the shed and getting help from a few people, the next phase of my TransAlp’s customisation is almost complete. I mentioned last year I was keen to extend the fuel range of the TA, particularly for the long distances between outback fuel stops. In the process of doing this, I was interested in trying to turn this bike into a twin exhaust – upswept, Rally style!

I had purchased a USA made KTM 950 AdvTank , with the intention of fitting one of these to both the LH & RH side of the bike. The tank arrived – and whilst making some clever brackets, it could be made fit the LH side, the RH side was not going to work. Disappointingly, the AdvTank went onto the flea market.
Another option was the Boano AT650 / AT750 (RD04), 17 Litre rear fuel tanks & panels. Further investigation revealed two drawbacks:
- I would need to source & fit the rear frame and mudguard section from an AT650 or AT750 (ok);
- Jarno Boano advised that their rear rack was only rated to carry top load maximum of 7kg (problem).





SYDADVGS, suggested contacting KTM Matt, as he had been making a couple of aluminum rear tanks for some orange machines (640’s, etc). I sent a few details to Matt, and it all seemed ‘do-able’.

EXHAUST SYSTEM

During this time I had been researching exhaust system components and options. Some Arrow headers were sourced from Italy. After talking to a few people, someone (can’t remember who???) suggested Foran Exhausts in Gosford (near Sydney). I went to visit Denis with the headers and some pictures of rally bikes (KTM 660RR & 690RR’s). Denis advised he could manufacture replica mufflers (measurements via Johnno 950 – thanks!) and the mid pipe – but to keep the costs a bit lower, he advised sourcing mufflers from overseas. After scouting around, the closest thing I could find was some SP Engineering units:



**Link: http://www.spengineering.co.uk/product-1-stainless-big-bore-xls-exhaust.html

They are 2” ID straight through cans, approx 100mm OD, 300mm long. Tips are 2 ½” dia !!!!
The mufflers are mounted to the original blinker mounting brackets, with some black nylon spacers made up to space out the mufflers:



The spacer dimensions are: 8mm ID, 30mm OD, 30mm length.
Mounting hardware:
2 x 94050-08000 Nut – Flange M8 (Honda Part)
2 x 95701-0805000 Bolt – Flange M8 x 50 (Honda Part)
2 x 90535-KB9-000 Washers – M8, Large OD (Honda Part)


The rear blinkers were repositioned to the rear carry rack:



The Arrow header pipes received an M8 exhaust gas test point approx 6” from the header ports.
The bike was then taken to Denis for him to work his magic. The exhaust system is effectively 2 – 1 – 2, where by the scavenging / extracting function of the headers is retained.

After the intermediate pipe was completed (less fuel tanks mount points...), the bike came home. There were a few things that needed attention. The side stand was fouling on the LHS rear pipe:





(Sorry about these 2 x pics being a bit blurry..)

The mounting bracket was cut through the weld on both sides (not cut completely through). The side stand mounting plate was bent outwards approx 5-10 degrees. This took a couple of attempts to get correct. The side stand was then rebuilt, using a new section of pipe with a bend to curl the stand back towards the bike. The bend is 22 degrees:



The mid-pipe needs supporting where the pipe splits to the twin section. The following hardware was used:
1 x 5L-4804 Clip (P Type) (Caterpillar Part)
1 x 9L-6331 Bracket (Caterpillar Part)
1 x 90535-KB9-000 Washers – M8, Large OD (Honda Part)
1 x 94050-08000 Nut – Flange M8 (Honda Part)
1 x 95701-0802500 Bolt – Flange M8 x 25 (Honda Part)

NOTE: the 9L-6331 Cat Bracket was mounted to the Pro-Link U-Section mounting point:



The next item to address was the need for a heat shield on the RHS rear pipe:



(NOTE: the Side Stand shields left leg from the LHS rear pipe)

I tried to find a straight exhaust shield from a Honda bike, but could not find anything. After scouring the internet, I found that the heat shield from a 1997 Yamaha TT600E Belgarde would fit nicely. The following parts were utilised:
1 x 5CHE4-62800 Protector (Yamaha Part)
2 x 90164-06017 Screw (need to shorten) (Yamaha Part)
2 x 90206-06090 Washer – Wave (Yamaha Part)
4 x 4BD-14760-00 Washer – Protector (Yamaha Part)
2 x N/A Nut – M6 Stainless (Hardware Store)

The M6 Stainless nuts need to be TIG welded to the RHS rear pipe.

TANKS
Next up the TA was taken to KTM Matt for him to fabricate the tanks & inner mounting brackets.
The upper, rear mounts:



Replace the inner rear mudguard / fender bolt with a longer M8 x 50mm Flange Head Bolt (95701-0805000). The tank is retained with a 94050-08000 Flange Nut. Hardware for both sides combined:
2 x 94050-08000 Nut – Flange M8 (Honda Part)
2 x 95701-0805000 Bolt – Flange M8 x 50 (Honda Part)

The upper, front mounts:





The tanks are bolted to the mount assemblies with 1 x M8 x 16mm Bolt on each side:
2 x 95701-0801600 Bolt – Flange M8 x 16 (Honda Part)

The lower, front mounts:



First up, the pillion foot pegs were removed. The tanks bolt up, using two M8 x 20mm bolts on each side. Hardware as follows:
4 x 95701-0802500 Bolt – Flange M8 x 25 (Honda Part)

Other progress photos of the tanks’ construction:





After painting, the fuel tank filler necks were fitted and sealed with 3 Bond. The ‘Grey’ 3 Bond variety has a greater resilience to Petrol – so go with it, not the white.

FUEL PUMP, TAPS, and LINES
The fuel pump and its mounting bracket were purchased through Boano. This allowed the Fuel Pump to be mounted above the Starter Motor. I adjusted the orientation of the mounting plate on the pump, as the fuel lines would have been running next to the LH Rear Spark Plug Lead.

1 x Mikuni DF52-82 Fuel Pump (Sourced – Boano)
1 x N/A Mounting Bracket (Sourced – Boano)

I wanted to be able to switch fuel supply between the Front (Original Honda Tank) and the Rear Auxiliary Tanks. After a bit of looking around, I found this little 3-Way sucker:



(Yes I know the clamp is loose...)

I sourced it through a local Husky / Toro ride on lawn mower dealer. Basically, ask them for an equivalent on any of their duel tanked ride on mowers. Details:
1 x 745-059 Fuel Tap – 3 Way (Hustler) (Mower Dealer)
1 x N/A Mounting Bracket (Flat Bar Aluminum)

Main Tank Fuel Tap – with the fuel pump being vacuum operated, I had a problem / dilemma with what to do with the main front tank fuel tap. The problem being it is vacuum opened. With a Scott Oiler running off the front cylinder vacuum port, and the fuel pump running off the rear cylinder – there wasn’t many options. The fitting on the main tank is a peculiar size – I even sourced a second hand Honda NTV650 fuel tap (non-vac) – but the thread was different. So, having a bit of a ‘thought’ – why couldn’t I make the tap normally open, instead of normally closed:





Disassemble the fuel valve, switch the spring to the other side, and reassemble. Now holds in the open position. NOTE: the spring sits nicely over the inner casting:



For the Fuel Lines, parts breakdown:
3 x Metres 6mm or ¼” Fuel Line (Auto Store)
1 x 16958-MB0-000 Tee Piece – 6mm Hose (Honda Part)
10 x 95002-4120008 Hose Clamp (Honda Part)
0.2 x Metres 19mm Heat Shrink (Electrical Store)
3 x 4K-8864 0.50” P Clamps – Vinyl Coated (Caterpillar Part)
NOTE: The heat shrink was used on certain areas of the fuel line to provide better mechanical protection – if there was a chance the line may rub on adjacent parts.

Fuel Taps – Rear Tanks, were supplied with the tanks via KTM Matt. They’re a KTM type fuel tap (aftermarket version).

The fuel tank breather lines are simply some left over 4mm clear tube. Each tank was supplied with a M4 grease nipple (centre valve removed). Whilst these would work fine to connect the tube to, I had some left over brass M4 barb fittings from the Scott Oiler kit.

SIDE PLATES
With the removal of the original side plates to accommodate the fuel tanks, I wanted to have some sort of panel / cover over the air filter housing and battery. So I knocked up some cardboard versions:



Then, trace and cut out from 2mm Aluminum sheet:





Finally, the aluminum versions were used by a local composite company as moulds to make fiberglass versions.

COMING TOGETHER – Bits n Pieces
As the bike came together, two things needed to be addressed. The first was protecting the cross over section of the exhaust pipe. It was exposed & vulnerable. So KTM Matt built up a new bash plate with a lowered section at the rear to protect the pipe. The base is 5mm aluminum, so I’ve taken to it with a hole saw to reduce its weight.
The other item was the rear exhaust pipe mounting supports. Once the tanks were built, the bike went back to Denis so he could TIG some brackets to the pipe. This would allow them to be supported by the tank:



The following hardware was used:
2 x 94050-08000 Nut – Flange M8 (Honda Part)
2 x 95701-0802500 Bolt – Flange M8 x 25 (Honda Part)
2 x N/A Washers – Black Plastic (Made at Home)

The intent of the 8.5mm x 25mm x 3mm black plastic washers is to reduce heat transfer from the pipes into the fuel tanks.

There was a whole heap of other work carried out during this period including:

- Fitment of Sena SR10 UHF Bluetooth Adapter;
- Fitment of GME TX3100 UHF and Antenna;
- Valve Adjustment done;
- Fitment of Mitas E09 Dakar 140/80-17 rear tyre;
- Fitment of 82 Deg C Thermo Fan Switch; &
- Fitment of TA650 Carburettors.

With radical change in exhaust and different carburettors, the bike went back onto the dyno to check out the fuelling. Both cylinders were running rich on the main, while rear also needed leaning off on the needle. The rear went back from a #128 to a #125, plus lowering the needle 1 x position. The front was a #125. A #122 was ordered and fitted, though has not been retested.
Disappointingly, the Hp figures were down significantly (43hp versus 48hp previous), though hopefully the rich mixture it the culprit.

HERE SHE IS


Here are a few pics of the end result:











VERDICT
The LH Tank is 10L. The RH Tanks is 11L. That plus the original 18L up works out to 39L all up. Test run yesterday up to Armidale (fully fuelled, plus additional 10L fuel in Jerry Can, plus 10L of water, plus loaded saddles, plus camping gear, & tank bag – fully loaded!!!) saw an overall figure of 597km. That works out to 15.3km / Litre. All the while, running up the New England range at anywhere between 100km/h to $1.20 / hr.

The exhaust sounds awesome, but it is very, very loud. I think I’ll need to be careful not to draw too much unwanted attention from Mr. Policeman…

The problem at the moment is an intermittent fuel starvation problem when running off the rear tanks. Sometimes this has occurred in either slow traffic (low fuel demand) or say, cracking up Moombi range with the throttle on the stop. Normal running at 80 – 110km / h seems fine. It is quite possibly the pump playing up. Further diagnosis required. KTM Matt has kindly lent me (with option to buy) a Mikuni DF52-44 to try and see if that resolves the problem.

The only other item I need to sort out is the seat bolts are not accessible with the tanks fitted. I'm still working on a solution to this problem - but I suspect a strap with release clips might be involved. At the moment the UHF radio antenna bracket is keeping the seat from jumping off.


Anyway, my dream bike is getting closer to reality. The next step will be to get that little v-twin banging a bit harder. But that will have to wait a while...


Cheers,

Dan.

Thunder Dan screwed with this post 04-29-2013 at 03:11 AM
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Old 04-29-2013, 03:40 AM   #14639
mas335
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Fantastic work as always, well done.
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Old 04-29-2013, 03:53 AM   #14640
Dr E
Chasing after theory
 
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Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Pacific Northwest
Oddometer: 143
One word....WOW!

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