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Old 01-23-2010, 11:55 AM   #121
B-B
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: N. Georgia, USA
Oddometer: 152
As long as you keep it on the road I'd think patch kit, irons and a pump/gauge should be adequate; maybe a pocket socket driver and some of the common size sockets and a multitool like the Leatherman Crunch, if only to tweak adjustments to mirrors and whatnot. Tiny LED flashlight is nice to have as well.

B-B screwed with this post 01-23-2010 at 12:09 PM
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Old 01-23-2010, 01:08 PM   #122
mdw403
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how about this thread

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=262998
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Old 01-27-2010, 04:40 PM   #123
KLRscoob
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Location: San Diego CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DolphinJohn
how exactly are we supposed to get the wheels off?
Where do you get the tools?
Sears didnt have a jumbo-ass hex even close to that size
Leave the hex side pinch bolt snug until you have loosened the other side, once they are other side is finger loose, loosen the hex side pinch bolts and push the axle out. I have taken my wheels off of my 8GS numerous times this way and have never needed the large hex. Good luck, it seems to work for me!
-J
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Old 01-27-2010, 06:53 PM   #124
jaycommando
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Thumb Fork Stand.

Just purchased and received the BestRest Fork stand http://www.bestrestproducts.com/p-25...ork-stand.aspx
It seems to be well put together (KISS) and an easier way of holding up the bike (not a fan of the leaning tower of pannier).I shall try it out and put together a review this weekend!

(Keep It Simple Stupid)
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Old 02-03-2010, 12:49 PM   #125
rhicks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaycommando
Just purchased and received the BestRest Fork stand http://www.bestrestproducts.com/p-25...ork-stand.aspx
It seems to be well put together (KISS) and an easier way of holding up the bike (not a fan of the leaning tower of pannier).I shall try it out and put together a review this weekend!

(Keep It Simple Stupid)
Jay, have you propped the bike up yet? I think this would be worth having in case of the front tube needing repair but wonder how sturdy the actual bar is. What is your experience with it?
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Old 02-03-2010, 01:34 PM   #126
jaycommando
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front fork holder

Having read the instructions and then put the bike on the support (i did not remove my front wheel) i found the support to work just fine.
However i stress that the handlebars MUST be straight and fixed with the straps included. any turning of the bars shifts the balance point and bike plummets to ground!! a mate helped me verify this as i didnt want to drop the bike we each stood on a side then turned the bars first left (bike dropped to the right) then turned right (bike dropped to the left).
but i can support that if your on your own and need to repair a front flat it works!!!! Very Very well!. no need to prop up any thing with rocks or panniers.

Am still trying to find good weather and a few spare minutes to put together a decent review. should get it sorted on sunday before the hockey/superbowl
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Old 02-03-2010, 01:39 PM   #127
rhicks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaycommando
Having read the instructions and then put the bike on the support (i did not remove my front wheel) i found the support to work just fine.
However i stress that the handlebars MUST be straight and fixed with the straps included. any turning of the bars shifts the balance point and bike plummets to ground!! a mate helped me verify this as i didnt want to drop the bike we each stood on a side then turned the bars first left (bike dropped to the right) then turned right (bike dropped to the left).
but i can support that if your on your own and need to repair a front flat it works!!!! Very Very well!. no need to prop up any thing with rocks or panniers.

Am still trying to find good weather and a few spare minutes to put together a decent review. should get it sorted on sunday before the hockey/superbowl

Excellent! Thank you very much and will eagerly await the review.
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Old 02-05-2010, 01:32 PM   #128
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Pissed Wait out.

Gonna have 25-30 inches of snow here this weekend. Will get back to you asap with that review.
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Old 05-31-2010, 07:52 PM   #129
capt_enduro
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Here's my long-distance kit. Everything fits in that mill-spec tool bag. It's big and heavy, but there's everything you need to service the bike, including oil and tire changes. With the exception of a chain brush and torque wrench, I try to use the tools in the bag when working on the bike.




All the usual spanners and torqs bits, tire pump, patches, valve-stem tool and tire irons.

Some points of interest:
  • The tool-roll is also US Army mill-spec. These and the heavy canvas tool tool bags can be bought on the cheap at your local army surplus store. Or you can go with the slightly more time consuming route and join the military.
  • Duct tape, hose clamps and tie wraps: If it moves and it's not suppose to.
  • Chain lube: If it doesn't move, and it's suppose to.
  • Service-removable Loc-Tite (or equivalent). Any accessory, and every fastener on that bike that gets removed on a regular basis (e.g. sprocket covers, bash plate, etc.) gets thread locker.
  • Leatherman Super Tool: Serves as pliers, knife, wire cutter, file, beer opener etc.
  • BMW Roadside Assistance Card: If all else fails.
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Old 05-31-2010, 10:23 PM   #130
EnderTheX
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Location: DFW Area, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capt_enduro
Here's my long-distance kit. Everything fits in that mill-spec tool bag. It's big and heavy, but there's everything you need to service the bike, including oil and tire changes. With the exception of a chain brush and torque wrench, I try to use the tools in the bag when working on the bike.




All the usual spanners and torqs bits, tire pump, patches, valve-stem tool and tire irons.

Some points of interest:
  • The tool-roll is also US Army mill-spec. These and the heavy canvas tool tool bags can be bought on the cheap at your local army surplus store. Or you can go with the slightly more time consuming route and join the military.
  • Duct tape, hose clamps and tie wraps: If it moves and it's not suppose to.
  • Chain lube: If it doesn't move, and it's suppose to.
  • Service-removable Loc-Tite (or equivalent). Any accessory, and every fastener on that bike that gets removed on a regular basis (e.g. sprocket covers, bash plate, etc.) gets thread locker.
  • Leatherman Super Tool: Serves as pliers, knife, wire cutter, file, beer opener etc.
  • BMW Roadside Assistance Card: If all else fails.
Nice... I've been debating carrying chain lube or not. I carry a small 3 oz can of WD40 for everything other than a chain (mainly to help with tires). On my trips I just clean and wax thoroughly beforehand and then bum some lube off local shops every 1k miles or so... seems to be fine after 13k miles on the stock F800GS chain.

What do you guys think? To carry the lube or not?
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Old 06-01-2010, 06:31 PM   #131
JRWooden
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I'd say hell yes!

I lube my chain at least 1X / day, a second time if I ride thru lots of wet stuff. I have one of the little license plate storage kits and in that I keep a folding toothbrush and a low-profile bottle of my favorite lube. With the center stand it only takes a couple minutes and gotta be good for the chain.
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Old 06-01-2010, 07:53 PM   #132
capt_enduro
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I have this 2 x 500 mile run between Atlanta and Durham that I like to do - almost always raining hard at some point so chain lube is a must. Looking for a smaller can though.


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Old 06-01-2010, 08:26 PM   #133
dukedar
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Location: Montreal, Qc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EnderTheX
What do you guys think? To carry the lube or not?
I just did a 11,000 km run with the F800GS, and even though I put on the DID, I lubed it every day or roughly every 1000-1500 kms. It hasn't stretched yet, and the links are not binding

So I say yes

Given the chain history with this bike, I wasn't taking any chances!
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Old 06-02-2010, 08:58 AM   #134
Trout
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I carry a mini can of 622 Strong all the time (under the seat) and I take a large can with on longer trips.
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Old 06-19-2010, 08:49 PM   #135
Moto Mikey
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My Toolkit I just finished putting together:

Has all the wrenches, sockets, torx, E-torx, hex wrenches, etc that are needed. Also carry a mini multimeter (yellow case), loctite, and mini LED flashlight. Everything (minus the leatherman multitool) fit in the blue tool tube bag, which fits snuggly inside my tool tube. For tires issues, I have an ADV-Design tire changing kit, Slime pump and Rema tire patch kit.






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