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Old 06-29-2014, 05:28 AM   #1
darthslayer OP
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Bluhduh What's with the shitty screws&bolts of 1150GS + help needed to removed worn screw!

Hello mates,

I'm doing my first maintanence but whenever I put my tool in to any kind of hole (well it felt awkward a little bit when I put it like this) it easily deformes. For example an allen bolt of the clutch bleed kit cover or the clutch master slave cover. Both of them get f*cked immediately. I've done a hell lot of repairs on my bandit 600 nothing happened like this. So any bros sharing the same situation as I do.

Also any ideas for removing worn out phillips screw of clutch master cylinder cover.
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Old 06-29-2014, 07:00 AM   #2
Pampero
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I'd like to help you but I don't share your opinion. My 13 year old bike's fasteners have held up well, and are of generally good quality. It's important to make sure you use the exact tool for the job, especially with Phillips head screws, but BMW doesn't use many of those except perhaps on the brake and clutch fluid reservoirs. Those are somewhat easier to muck up, but it helps if you use the right driver. The hex bolts seem quite good to me, and I have very little visible corrosion or finish loss on them, one of the key measures of fastener quality in my view.

I've had no problem removing the grub screws on the clutch bleed fitting. To remove a stuck or mucked up Phillips fastener, try slotting it (carefully) and taking it out with a bladed driver.
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Old 06-29-2014, 07:18 AM   #3
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I think I'm of the same opinion as Pampero.

The clutch and brake reservoir covers are difficult sometimes, and you can buy or source allen head stainless bolts. I think even Wunderlich sold a batch for replacement. I think an inmate here even had a collection he was selling because he bought them in bulk.

Aside from that all my fasteners have been very good.
The fasteners on my 2003 V-Strom, conversely, corroded. Whatever grade 'stainless' or whatever sort of coating they used was rubbish. Everything in the line of road spray was compromised.
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Old 06-29-2014, 07:37 AM   #4
LaurelPerryOnLand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darthslayer View Post
Hello mates,

I'm doing my first maintanence but whenever I put my tool in to any kind of hole (well it felt awkward a little bit when I put it like this) it easily deformes. For example an allen bolt of the clutch bleed kit cover or the clutch master slave cover. Both of them get f*cked immediately. I've done a hell lot of repairs on my bandit 600 nothing happened like this. So any bros sharing the same situation as I do.

Also any ideas for removing worn out phillips screw of clutch master cylinder cover.
From my experience...albeit NOT a master mechanic level...ALLEN bolts can easily become stripped BECAUSE you might be using the WRONG SIZE allen wrench.

There seems to be enough of a difference between the RIGHT SIZE and the one slightly SMALLER that they can easily become stripped.

Next time...after you feel you have the CORRECT SIZE...try to use the NEXT SIZE UP and see if it fits TIGHTLY.
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Old 06-29-2014, 10:43 AM   #5
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Snap - on tools sells wonderful easy out tools for stripped fasteners.
I am sure there are others available as well. Removing fasteners can become an art form!
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Old 06-29-2014, 11:32 AM   #6
def
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Every fastener on my GS is OE. None have failed. Of course, I use the correct size wrench, tool, etc.

My sockets are 6 point, the box open combinations are Craftsman, my hex wrenches are hardened steel, not cheap China crap and the Torx are hardened steel metric sizes and I know how to apply them so as not to round the fastener flats when applying force.

If you're having trouble with Phillips screws, they are designed to cam out so, you may be applying too much force.

Use caution and the correct tools, apply the correct tightening torque and you'll never ruin fasteners.
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Old 06-29-2014, 12:10 PM   #7
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I completely agree with choosing the correct size of tooling but all my tools are chrome-vanadium alloy and the ones I messed with are not in between half sizes which being a mechanical engineer special cases may apply :)

Also for the corrosion, all of the fasteners in my bike has signs of rust on them which brings up another issue that changing all of them in one shot for complete solution. Because as I noticed many of the bolt&screws on the bike have coating but not Cr alloy for rust occurance.

By the way thanks for the snap-on option,I'll try to find something to help me about the subject but worst case scenario is using a driller :)


Thanks guys
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Old 06-30-2014, 02:53 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by darthslayer View Post
For example an allen bolt of the clutch bleed kit cover or the clutch master slave cover.
Dip the clutch bleed unit a cup of boiling water before you attempt to undo it. And when you replace it use a smear of copper grease.

Screws - Simple. Use a good quality screwdriver of the correct size to undo them, not a worn out also used a chisel/pry bar screwdriver.
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Old 06-30-2014, 07:06 AM   #9
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Lube, impact, JIS?

PB Blaster or some other lubricating solvent, then if you have the room / under part isn't fragile hit it with an impact driver.

I ponied up for a set of JIS screwdrivers for the old Honda I have, they seem to work better with the lack of 'camming out' of the regular phillips driver.

If it seems to slip I've read you can put some valve grinding compound or some other similar abrasive to help 'grip' the driver against the pieces you want to remove.

I've only stripped two allen bolts on mine, both were from me wrenching off center.

If you've got something like a allen key bolt that's corroded (40 yr old Honda as an example) and find it won't fit any standard or metric very well you've got two choices as I see it. Wrap some foil around the smaller hex key to increase the area or jam a slotted screwdriver in one side to make up the difference in space.
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Old 06-30-2014, 07:09 AM   #10
cantupshift
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Replacement Fastener

Also with replacement fasteners don't just hop on to fleabay and purchase a set of polished stainless replacement bolts. Depending on the application of the bolt it may exceed the limits and cause it to shear off while torquing, or at a later point when you least expect it.
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Old 06-30-2014, 08:40 AM   #11
Schlug
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Indeed, most of the stainless hardware available at discount is soft like French cheese and may not be your best choice. It may gall, snap off, or corrode.

Consider a different material with a very good never seize (or copper grease as Steptoe calls it) or thread locker.
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Old 07-01-2014, 03:43 PM   #12
darthslayer OP
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Wow thanks guys for so many feedbacks I'll consider using copper grease on following applications also considering the change screws&bolts to Cr alloy alternatives for long term use

Thanks again guys, you rock
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Old 07-01-2014, 10:24 PM   #13
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I have for sale from my bulk purchase the Allen head stainless bolts for the reservoir covers.

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Old 07-02-2014, 05:32 AM   #14
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On some of the 1150 models - maybe just the later ones but I usually see them on RTs - the phillips-head screws are stainless. I think BMW now supplies black but I'll order a few to see.

Phillips is WAY better than the allen-head screws that I sometimes find on customer bikes. Small allens are - IMO - simply not suitable for countersunk screws where there is so much contact area plus the possibility of corrosion, and they are especially unsuitable in soft SS. Torx probably would be better but Phillips performs very well here if you have a proper screwdriver.
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