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Old 11-10-2014, 12:41 PM   #1
Fearless Whetu OP
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Rear wheel question

Im wondering if someone knows wether a rear wheel (including bearings hub etc) from a 2011-12 F800gs is the same specs and will fit my 2014 bike.

I've been looking for a spare rear so I can put my knobbies on a second wheel and not destroy them commuting to work. I have found one (a second hand Woodies Wheel Works) that has done probably 20 thousand ks.

Would this rim be ok and would it fit ? Any advice is much appreciated as I aint done this before

This is it
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Old 11-10-2014, 04:12 PM   #2
Kiwi Tinkerer
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yep - same

According to the parts fiche for the 2008 and 2013+ model years the rear wheel part numbers and rear hub part numbers are the same.

http://www.maxbmwmotorcycles.com/fic...8&rnd=04282014
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Old 11-10-2014, 07:04 PM   #3
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Thumb

Thank you. I'll bookmark that page too.
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Old 11-11-2014, 10:47 AM   #4
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COOL for you.... I want!!!!!
Transform bike with simple wheel swap,
I've thought about it over the years with various bikes, just never did it yet.....
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:58 PM   #5
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Its taken a while ad I have a very fair price from an inmate for the wheel but the cost of the brake rotor $510.00…. Bloody hell, I'm not sure if I can do it now.
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Old 11-11-2014, 02:00 PM   #6
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http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/MetalGear...item257a123352
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Old 11-11-2014, 02:01 PM   #7
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I wanted to have two sets of wheels for my F800GS. It would be really nice to have one set with knobbies and another with street tires. But after seeing what it would cost I decided to get better at changing tires.
Two sets of wheels really doesn't make sense to me unless they are completely set up with brakes, and anti lock rings.
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Old 11-11-2014, 02:21 PM   #8
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Are you talking about getting JUST a rear wheel, or both front and rear? If only the rear, what kind of tire are you planning to run on the front? Will you be changing the front tire as you swap wheels?

I got a really good deal on a used set of wheels about a year ago, and they included the brake rotors and even a set of tires that only had maybe 4,000 miles on them. I did have to buy an ABS ring for one of the wheels though. One of the best deals I made! Paid a lot less than $2,000 for the whole thing, including the ABS ring.

I can swap wheels in less than 30 minutes, and I keep a set of TKC80's on one set and Anakee 3's on the other. Changing tires on the other hand takes me a LOT longer!

If you find a deal and can afford it, a second set of wheels is really very nice to have.
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Old 11-12-2014, 12:29 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B_C_Ries View Post
I wanted to have two sets of wheels for my F800GS. It would be really nice to have one set with knobbies and another with street tires. But after seeing what it would cost I decided to get better at changing tires.
Two sets of wheels really doesn't make sense to me unless they are completely set up with brakes, and anti lock rings.
Yep, this is what I came to as well. The wheel (with a good tyre was going to cost me $200 but the rotor etc was over $600.00) I will put on hold for now until I can find a good deal on a complete wheel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtl_Biker
Are you talking about getting JUST a rear wheel, or both front and rear? If only the rear, what kind of tire are you planning to run on the front? Will you be changing the front tire as you swap wheels?

I got a really good deal on a used set of wheels about a year ago, and they included the brake rotors and even a set of tires that only had maybe 4,000 miles on them. I did have to buy an ABS ring for one of the wheels though. One of the best deals I made! Paid a lot less than $2,000 for the whole thing, including the ABS ring.

I can swap wheels in less than 30 minutes, and I keep a set of TKC80's on one set and Anakee 3's on the other. Changing tires on the other hand takes me a LOT longer!

If you find a deal and can afford it, a second set of wheels is really very nice to have.
I would love to do both but the priority at the moment is the rear as this is the fastest wearing. I would just leave the front as a TCK or Karoo 3.

If I could find a deal like you I would go for it. I also may just bite the bullet and get a set of Woodies wheels but then I have to buy 3 rotors

The rear I was planning on using the Karoo traveller or the Mitas E09 Dakar version.
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Old 11-12-2014, 10:44 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fearless Whetu View Post
Yep, this is what I came to as well. The wheel (with a good tyre was going to cost me $200 but the rotor etc was over $600.00) I will put on hold for now until I can find a good deal on a complete wheel.
Between fleabay and aftermarket rotors, you should be able to lower your cost to half that. Galfer and braking make nice stuff, the feel is much better than stock and costs half the price of the OEM rotors
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Old 11-13-2014, 01:19 PM   #11
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I also have 2 complete sets of wheels. While it was expensive, that rear tire is such a pain to change I can justify the expense just to save the hassle.
I also went a little further and got a second sprocket carrier. I keep a 45 tooth on the offroad setup and a 41 on the road tire. A machinist pal made up new axle spacer blocks to allow me to swap between them without having to change chain tension. So now I just grab the front and rear wheel for whatever type of riding I'm doing that day and they're installed in about 10 minutes, with appropriate gearing as well.
It's not as nice as turning the key in a second bike in the garage, but it's the next best thing.
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Old 11-13-2014, 01:47 PM   #12
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I also went a little further and got a second sprocket carrier. I keep a 45 tooth on the offroad setup and a 41 on the road tire. A machinist pal made up new axle spacer blocks to allow me to swap between them without having to change chain tension.
I am curious, how does this work? Can you post some pics? If the sprocket is the same radius as the old one, my understanding is that you will have to adjust the chains. The axle blocks, again based on how I see it, is to ensure that the axle lines up properly in the swingarm.
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:54 PM   #13
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Well, here's how it worked for me.
I adjusted the chain to the correct tension with the larger (45) sprocket installed. I then swapped out the wheel and put the one with the smaller sprocket in place. Without moving the small bolts acting as the adjusters, I moved the axle into what I determined was the correct position for chain tension with the smaller sprocket. I measured the distance between the axle blocks and the adjusting bolts (x amount, as I don't remember what it was exactly) and had a friend make up new axle blocks with "x" amount of material added. This means I can swap the blocks when I pull the axle to match the sprocket I am using and do not have to touch the chain tensioner every time.
Works like a charm. Without it, you'd have to use the same gearing for on and off road tires, and where's the sense in that when you've already gone so far as to have multiple wheel sets?
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Old 11-13-2014, 09:11 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayner View Post
Well, here's how it worked for me.
I adjusted the chain to the correct tension with the larger (45) sprocket installed. I then swapped out the wheel and put the one with the smaller sprocket in place. Without moving the small bolts acting as the adjusters, I moved the axle into what I determined was the correct position for chain tension with the smaller sprocket. I measured the distance between the axle blocks and the adjusting bolts (x amount, as I don't remember what it was exactly) and had a friend make up new axle blocks with "x" amount of material added. This means I can swap the blocks when I pull the axle to match the sprocket I am using and do not have to touch the chain tensioner every time.
Works like a charm. Without it, you'd have to use the same gearing for on and off road tires, and where's the sense in that when you've already gone so far as to have multiple wheel sets?
Ah yes, that totally makes sense. For some reason I was thinking of thinner/thicker axle blocks. That's actually a smart idea. If you have gone through the trouble of getting a second set of wheels, what's two chain adjusters more?
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Old 11-15-2014, 01:54 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by sarathmenon View Post
Between fleabay and aftermarket rotors, you should be able to lower your cost to half that. Galfer and braking make nice stuff, the feel is much better than stock and costs half the price of the OEM rotors
Yes I saw these and you are right, but it's still over $500.00 plus postage for me here and if I can I'd rather keep the rotor stock.

Im going to wait for a complete wheel as I saw an entire front and rear wheel set the other day for an R1200gs including tyres for $250.00….. If I can get a complete rear for around the same I'd be happy.

One will turn up
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