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Old 03-22-2009, 03:24 PM   #211
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Rt 33/119 - Gilmer Co / Lewis Co Line

Gilmer County - To read more about Thomas Walker Gilmer : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Walker_Gilmer




Historical Marker (Side 1) Heading southwest on Rt 33/119 towards Glenville. Located about midway between Glenville and Weston.




Southwest on Rt 33/119 entering Gilmer Co.



Lewis Co - (Excerpt from Greenbrier County historical archives : http://files.usgwarchives.org/wv/gre...os/cclewis.txt )

....... Col. Charles Lewis, who was killed at the battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774. This Col. Charles Lewis was born in Augusta county, Virginia, in 1736. He was the youngest son of John Lewis, the pioneer, and brother of Gen. Andrew Lewis, great-greatgrandfather of Mrs. C. V. Stacy, and was also of the number who fell at Point Pleasant. In 1760, Col. Charles Lewis married Sarah Murry, and left seven children, viz., Elizabeth, Margaret, John, Mary, Thomas, Andrew, and Charles (the father of Charles C. Lewis), who was born in Augusta county, Virginia, in 1774, probably in September, as in the will of Col. Charles Lewis, dated August 10, 1774, just before starting on his march to Point Pleasant, he provides for the unborn child of his wife, Mary.This unborn child was Charles Lewis, who served with distinction under Gen. Anthony Wayne, in 1795, in his Indian campaign in the West, as a lieutenant, as is attested to by his commission, dated August 7, 1795, and signed by General Washington, and now in possession of his descendant, P.S. Lewis, of Mason county, West Virginia.




Same marker (Side 2) Heading northeast towards Weston.




Rt 33/119 heading northeast entering Lewis Co.
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Old 03-23-2009, 06:11 PM   #212
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Duck Run Cable Suspension Bridge - Gilmer Co

(I had to type this all out - not copy and paste - since it's on a PDF scan, so you all had better read this!! )

Excerpts from US Dept of the Interior , National Park Services, Application for National Register of Historic Places. Applied for in Nov 1996, approved June 1997.

The Duck Run Cable Suspension Bridge is located in a rural area known as Trubada, appx 3 miles east of Glenville, WV. The bridge spans the Little Kanawha River between WV Routes 30 and 5. Although overgrown with brush, the site retains much of its historical appearance. A concrete bridge completed in 1992 is located some 500 feet upstream from the suspension bridge. With the opening of the new bridge, the suspension bridge was taken out of service and is now undergoing rehabilitation as a historic and recreational site.

The Duck Run Cable Suspension Bridge consists of a main span of 209 feet 9 inches and two half-spans of 76 feet 6 inches and 65 feet 4 inches, respectively. The overall length of the bridge is 351 feet 7 inches. The two wire rope cables are supported by 4 reinforced concrete towers, 2 on each bank of the river and are anchored in 4 concrete anchorages. The concrete towers taper to the top with a flat coping. Although the bridge can be considered an example of the vernacular construction, the wire rope and all of the fittings were manufactured at that time by leading companies such as Roebling and Bethlehem Steel Corporation and were readily available from wire rope dealers. Wire rope was developed for a wide variety of industrial uses as a replacement for traditional organic hemp rope.

The timber bridge deck consists of 4-inch by 8-inch wooden planks laid flat and supported by pairs of 3-inch by 12-inch wood floor beams, 14 feet 1 inch long. These pairs of beams are in turn supported by vertical wire rope suspenders. The curb width is 10 feet 9 inches while the overall deck width is 11 feet 6 inches. WV Division of Highways records reveal the deck was replaced in 1958. Originally the bridge had no railing but a simple wooden 2-rail system was added over time.

The Duck Run Cable Suspension Bridge is significant under Criteria C for Engineering. The bridge was completed in 1922 and served the local community until 1992, when it was taken out of service following the completion of a new bridge across the Little Kanawha River in the nearby vicinity. The construction of the suspension bridge coincides with the National Good Roads Movement which attempted to improve the quality of America’s roads following WWI. This was the first nationwide attempt in America to provide paved all-weather roads in rural areas. The resulting network of roads also involved the construction of bridges. In the case of this bridge, it was to eliminate the river ford crossing for motor cars. Its construction made a significant contribution to the road network in Gilmer County.

About 1918, James w. Keith, who lived on Duck Run Road, purchased a motor car. He was not happy with the ford over the Little Kanawha River and began soliciting the county for a bridge to be built.

At that time, counties were responsible for their roads and Gilmer County did not have the money for such an undertaking. So, Keith drew support from M.B. Summers and other neighbors in the area. They began raising money through yard sales, cake walks, raffles, etc. A deed dated Feb 4th, 1921, gives permission from the landowner, E.W. Floyd and family, for a right of way to build the “Summers Suspension Bridge.”

Local boys joined Fred Lewis, County Road Engineer, as volunteer workers in the actual construction. Money raised in Duck Run and Bear Run communities helped pay for the materials. The bridge was completed in 1922.

Even though the construction of the bridge employed volunteer labor, this was not a typical Appalachian swinging bridge built without the benefit of engineering design but rather relied on the work of William M. Moss and Fred Lewis, Gilmer County engineers. The suspension bridge type offered the cheapest possible bridge to carry cars and provide a clear span of more than 200 feet over the river. By using readily available wire rope and associated fittings, a bridge with high quality components for the main structural element could provide a safe and yet very economical structure. While the main cables, suspenders, and associated clamps and other fittings were produced by leading steel companies, the wood deck was obtained locally, while the concrete, according to local informants, was made on site using Little Kanawha sand and gravel to produce the concrete. Little else is recorded on the actual construction. The resulting concrete lacked the quality control needed for long term durability. In order to ensure the capacity of the towers to support the cables, the corners of each tower were later reinforced with external steel angles and horizontal binders. They remain as a prominent feature of the bridge, In contrast, the anchorages appear to be in much better condition.

The bridge has deteriorated over the years, particularly since its abandonment in 1992. Nevertheless, deterioration has caused no significant change to the bridge’s historic integrity. Work is now underway to restore the bridge to its original condition for interpretation as an historic site. It will be used as a pedestrian bridge in a planned recreational area.




Historical Marker located on Rt 5 about 3 miles east of Glenville near Truebada. (Current spelling)







View of bridge and marker from across the highway.





Better view of the bridge. It is closed to all traffic - motorized and foot.





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Old 03-24-2009, 02:18 PM   #213
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Samuel Lewis Hays - Gilmer Co

Located on the north edge of Glenville, WV along Rt 33/119.

(From Wikipedia) -
Samuel Lewis Hays (20 Oct 1794 - 17 Mar 1871) was a nineteenth century politician in Virginia. Hays was born in Harrison County near Clarksburg in what would later become the state of West Virginia. He was married to Roanna Arnold in 1817 and moved to Lewis County (later Gilmer Co) to pursue agriculture in 1833. Following Roanna's death in 1841, Hays married twice more: first to Nancy Covert (died 1863) and then to Emma Fletcher.

Hays was elected as a Democrat to the 27th US Congress, serving from 1841 to 1843, and made an unsuccessful bid for reelection in 1842; however, he later served as a delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1850. During his service as a Representative, Hays sponsored the admission of Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson as a cadet to the military academy at West Point, and also urged the building of the Parkersburg-Staunton Turnpike. He later laid out the town of Glenville in 1845. Hays moved to Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in 1857 and was appointed Receiver of Public Moneys by President James Buchanan. He served in this capacity until 1860, at which time he resumed his agricultural interests. Following his death in 1871, Hays was interred at the Old Benton County Cemetery in Sauk Rapids.





Historical Marker located as you enter Glenville south-west bound on Rt 33/119, about 100 meters north of the junction with Rt 5 East. (Rite Aid Pharmacy parking lot).




The marker states that S.L. Hays' home was located here. It was, until they tore it down to build the Rite Aid Drug Store. At least that is what one of the employees told me as she was leaving the store.
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Old 03-24-2009, 02:30 PM   #214
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Ft Moore - Gilmer Co

Located on the campus of Glenville State College. The 30' X 30' log fort was built in 1864 and was occupied for only 8 months before being burned by Confederate soldiers.





Historical Marker located on the campus of Glenville State College between the President's Home and the Health Bldg.





You can see a little bit of the hill mentioned on the inscription. Nothing left of the original structure, though.



A little nicer view of the marker.
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Old 03-24-2009, 05:34 PM   #215
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Glenville State College / Teachers College - Gilmer Co

Located in Glenville, WV, which is about 25 miles west/southwest of Weston, at the intersection of Rt 33/119 and Rt 5. Glenville State College is best known as a teachers' college, preparing future educators.

From Wikipedia:

Glenville State college was founded in 1872 to serve the higher education needs of Central West Virginia. Glenville State College has gained wide recognition for its teaching excellence. By 1910, the College enrollment had exceeded the population of Glenville and grew into a full four-year College by 1931. Teacher preparation continued to be the central mission as over the years, the campus became known as "the Lighthouse on the Hill" for both the quality of the teaching and the quality of Glenville State graduates. Today, Glenville State still maintains a strong focus on teacher preparation, while offering additional degree programs in relevant areas that support the needs of the workplace in the 21st Century. Throughout its history, Glenville State has maintained a long tradition of teaching excellence by professors who care about each student as an individual, who take the time to get to know each student's goal and who are committed to helping students get an education that will prepare them for a successful career. The recognized strengths, from a caring friendly campus to the affordability for a quality education, have been an integral part of its history. Glenville State's continued commitment to its community roots and its desire to be a valued source of educational excellence in the future bodes well for Glenville State's yet-to-be-written history. [End]

To visit the GSC website: http://www.glenville.wvnet.edu/





Hisotrical Marker #1 (of 2 on campus) located in front of the library.





View of Marker #1 and some of the campus.





Another view of the campus. (And of my nearly-bald rear tire )




Historical Marker #2, located in front of the Administrative Bldg. on campus.





Better view of Marker #2.
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Old 03-24-2009, 06:35 PM   #216
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"Bethany Turnpike Tunnels" Located on State Route 67 about midway between Wellsburg and Bethany.
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Old 03-24-2009, 06:44 PM   #217
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"Campbell Cemetery" Located just ouside of Bethany, WV on a hill overlooking the Campbell House. If you like old cemeteries, you need to see this one. The hand hewed stone wall completely surrounds the cemetery. There are steps that go up and over the wall to get in. You can see them behind my motorcycle.
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Old 03-25-2009, 05:21 PM   #218
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Engle Homestead - Gilmer Co

Kind of a duplicate of Post #148 back on Pg 10. That was his birthplace - this was where he later lived.

Henry Everett Engle is credited with writing the music for the poem "The West Virginia Hills" in 1885, which became our first (of three) official State Songs. The poem was written by Ellen King. There is disagreement over who actually wrote the words - many (including the Historical Marker-maker) believe it was Ellen King's husband, Rev David King.

To see the complete lyrics of the WV State Song, head back to Post #148.




Historical Marker located southwest of Glenville about 6 miles on Rt 5 near the junction with CR 20 (Tanner Creek Rd). There is no indication the homestead or any part of it survives today.




View south of Rt 5 looking into the countryside. Nice area!




View northeast on Rt 5 towards Glenville.

Rt 5 is a very nice ride. I was focused on trying to watch for markers and not become a hood ornament on a Peterbilt, so I didn't get to enjoy the scenery as much as I should. I guess that's a good excuse to go back for another ride.
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Old 03-25-2009, 05:33 PM   #219
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Stalnaker Plantation & Cemetery - Gilmer Co

From WV County Comissioners' Association Histories Website :

http://www.polsci.wvu.edu/wv/history.html


In 1816, William Stalnaker received a grant of 30,000 acres in the county for his service as a Lieutenant in the War of 1812. Gilmer County became home to many veterans following the war of 1812, including George H. Beall, Townshend Beall, Joseph Bennett, Alexander McQuian, and James Farnsworth. He built a temporary home and brought his family (wife Elizabeth and son Salathiel) and twenty slaves to the site of an abandoned Indian village on the Little Kanawha River, near the mouth of Mill Seat Run. By 1820, his tobacco plantation was doing very well and he had a two-story brick mansion constructed on the property. A second mansion was later built on the property for his son and, on March 24, 1845, it served as the meeting place for the first session of the Gilmer County court. By that time, a large number of families lived in the area and it was known as DeKalb, named by William Stalnaker in honor of his hero Johann, Baron de Kalb, companion of the Marquis de Lafayette. [End]



Historical Marker (Side #1) - Located on Rt 5 about 10 miles west of Glenville, and just west of DeKalb.





Same Marker (Side #2) There were no directions given to the cemetery, and I was not able to spend enough time to find it. Another day, I hope.




Not much of a scenic turnoff, but the rest of the countryside is nice!
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Old 03-26-2009, 02:46 PM   #220
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Job's Temple - Gilmer Co

The oldest log church in Gilmer Co.
In 1845, southern sympathizers within Gilmer County's Methodist Church broke away from the Methodist Church and formed the Methodist Church South. They constructed their own church, called Job Temple, in 1860. In 1979, it became Gilmer County's first site to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Job's Temple, one of the oldest log churches in West Virginia, is situated on West Virginia Route 5 in Gilmer County, West Virginia. It is a log structure, rather small, rectangular in shape, and similar to many log structures that served settlers as places of worship in the Appalachian Mountains through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
The Temple, constructed by local labor between the years 1860 and 1866, is 18 x 24 feet in dimension, and constructed of 22" to 24" poplar logs that were locally cut. The poplar logs are laid in the familiar X squared & notched design which gives the Temple it's rectangular appearance. The roof was originally of hand-hewn clapboard (hewn with a broad axe ) , but due to natural deterioration , this roof was replaced by a tin roof in 1936. The original mortar was a clay mix, also done locally. Re-daubing was done i n the early 193Os, using the same type of local clay mix mortar as the original, and done in the original manner by a grandson of one of the first settlers in the area and supposedly one of the last individuals with knowledge of this old method.

The single entrance to Job's Temple faces east and consists of a large heavy wood door. There are four windows, two on the north and two on the south walls of the building. The interior of the building is in the same simplistic design as the exterior. Excepting a large section of the ceiling which is 1950 celetex, the interior is of wood and mostly original. The original sections of the ceiling are of poplar boards that are whipsawed and hand dressed. The walls (constructed of broad-boards), the floor , the wooden pulpit-lectern, and the wooden lamp stands are all original. The original benches were made from split-logs with wooden legs driven in a tether end. Only a few of these original benches remain, however. Most of the benches now in the Temple are backless, hand-made wooden benches constructed around 1934.

The property on which the Temple sits is approximately three acres and is mostly hilly and wooded. The 122 grave Job's Temple Cemetery is directly adjacent to the Temple, and dates from four years after the Temple itself was constructed. There is also a stone open-air lectern a few yards east of this church from which the various ceremonies and festivities connected with Job's Temple are conducted. Plans are in the offing to restore the original clapboard roof and the appropriate sections of the interior ceiling. Such a completed restoration would serve to enhance the beauty of this structure , which is already one of the areas most prominent and well-known landmarks.

Situated on a knoll overlooking Route 5 some nine miles from the Gilmer County seat of Glenville, Job's Temple stands as one of the only remaining Log churches still in use in the state of West Virginia. One of the oldest places of worship in central West Virginia, Job's Temple began as a result of the split in the Pisgah Methodist Church occasioned by the slavery issue in the 1850's. The pro-southern faction , or Methodist Episcopal Church (Southern), split from the main body of the Methodists and founded their own church near the site ofthe original Gilmer County courthouse (now disappeared) of De Kalb. Construction of the log structure was began in 1860, but the coming ofthe Civil War, during which most of Gilmer County's able-bodied men went off to fight , interrupted the building of the church. After the end of the Civil War the structure was completed in 1866, with the Rev. Pickens as it's first pastor.

Throughout the remainder of the 19th century, this log church, named Job's Temple after a local church member Job Westfall (not the Biblical Job) served as the primary place of worship and community center for the area. The church frequently served not only as a place of worship and focal point of weddings and funerals, but as a place of refuge during the frequent flooding that did and still does take place in this part of Gilmer County. In keeping with the spirit of a community center, the Temple was also used as the place of worship for the Baptist church during the year 1897-98. Sunday School continued to be held in Job's Temple until 1912, after which time the building was more or less abandoned except for occasional funerals and weddings and gradually fell into disrepair . Major renovations were begun in 1928 and continued throughout the early 1930's until the building was considered to be rehabilitated in 1936. At this time, the annual Job ' s Temple Homecomings began, which with ever-increasing attendance have continued down to the present time. The Homecoming is generally the concluding day's event ofthe annual West Virginia State Folk Festival,.which ends with Sunday services and a speech by some prominent West Virginian in the Temple.

Job's Temple was also the home of a prominent West Virginia "Singing School" during the period 1870-1890, which was attended by individuals from all over central West Virginia.

The Job's Temple Cemetery, which is directly adjacent to the Temple, is one of the oldest in Gilmer County, and the names on the grave markers represent some of the oldest and most prominent members of the Gilmer County community. The Cemetery is well-kept, and continues to be used. The last burial took place as recently as 1977. The object of great pride and veneration for the community, it is still the scene of weddings and funerals for members of the community.




Historical Marker located on Rt 5 about 10 miles west of Glenville (between DeKalb and Latonia).




View westbound on Rt 5, with Job's Temple on the hill to the right.





A better view of the church.

Nice riding out Rt 5 at this point.
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Old 03-27-2009, 11:50 AM   #221
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Brooke County markers

i will edit these later, too much to type at work
looking north on route 2 at the begining of town

looking south towards wheeling

and my bike

quick history, wellsburg was supposed to be the capitol of west virginia instead of wheeling. on their trip north the caravan broke a wagon wheel and a" lady" convinced them to make it in wheeling instead.
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Old 03-27-2009, 11:56 AM   #222
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grimes farm tre 27 from wellsburg

this is the grimes apple farm "Grimes Golden Apple" most of you know the history of this, but here is part of the actual farm
http://wellsburgapplefest.com/grimesgolden.aspx

most people dont walk far enough to see the actual spring used

it was a swamp so i didnt get my bike in there

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Old 03-27-2009, 12:01 PM   #223
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Drovers Inn rte 27 from wellsburg

this was a famous inn used by travlers going from washington pa to wheeling wv, if you come by GET SOME WINGS, one of the best in the area
http://www.droversinn.net/


this is the actual inn, used to have a working mill but no longer so :(

27 looking twards wellsburg

towards washington pa




i found 4 more yesterday so i will hit them on my way to work on tuesday

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Old 03-27-2009, 12:07 PM   #224
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tollgate house rte 27 wellsburg

better known as brooke hills park, swimming, golf, paddleboats, mini golf, great place to stop and relax. right before the PA border



the house as it stands today



this is the mansion that they turnrd into a spook house, really killing it so here is a distant pic



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Old 03-27-2009, 12:53 PM   #225
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Hey face plant - It's about time!

Aren't you happy I saved all those markers for you?
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