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Old 03-31-2009, 05:33 PM   #241
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First County Court - Calhoun Co

Again, not much on Google. To read about Calhoun County on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calhoun..._West_Virginia





Historical Marker located on Rt 5 about 1 mile west of Bigbend (about 20 miles west of Glenville).




View eastbound on Rt 5.
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Old 04-01-2009, 04:00 PM   #242
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Grantsville - Calhoun Co

Located on Rt 5 about 20 miles west of Glenville. Population: 565. County seat of Calhoun County. Home of the Annual Wood Festival.


For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grantsville,_West_Virginia





Historical Marker located in downtown Grantsville in front of the Calhoun County Court House.





View of the Marker and the Court House.




Downtown looking east. It has a nice, "home-town" atmosphere.





Downtown looking west.
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Old 04-01-2009, 04:15 PM   #243
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Rathbone Well - Wirt Co

Located on Rt 5 about 12 miles southeast of Elizabeth (30 miles west of Glenville) in Burning Springs.

(From Convention/Visitors Bureau of Parkersburg) The Rathbone Well, an 1880's era drilling facility, has been completely cleaned and refitted and now serves as a "living history park" to the public. The Rathbone Well is West Virginia's oldest producing oil well. When the well was first drilled in 1860, it produced a natural flow of more than one barrel every minute at the original depth of 139 feet. The Rathbone gusher prompted an oil boom in Burning Springs that peaked after the Civil War with an average of 50 oil companies incorporating each year from 1865 to 1867. The town of Burning Springs changed its name in 1861 to Rathbone (after the first well), although by 1868 the boom slowed down and the town went back to its former name. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Open dawn to dusk for self guided tours. Museum is open Saturday and Sunday.





Historical Marker located on Rt 5 about 12 miles southeast of Elizabeth.





View westbound on Rt 5. The actual Rathbone well is to the left, across the highway in a small display park.




The namesake - Rathbone Well.




Some good reading about the well.




Some of the many wells and pumping equipment on display. Interesting!

Rt 5 is still a great ride. This is the first time I have been in this area of WV, and I am pleasantly surprised. I always thought the only good bike roads were east of Elkins, but I was wrong. Lots of great scenery and challenging roads in the western half of the state!
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Old 04-02-2009, 03:05 AM   #244
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Ruble Church - Wirt Co

"All are welcome here except those of Northern Principles". So reads the sign in front of the Ruble Church, one of the oldest "still-attended" churches in WV. It is located off Rt 5 at Cherry, WV (about 5 miles southeast of Elizabeth and 35 miles west of Glenville) on CR 35/6 (Chestnut Road). From Rt 5, the CR is paved for the first 2 miles, then dirt/gravel with a couple of moderate inclines up to the hilltop where the church is located. My VStrom made it, but I'm still not real comfortable on inclines with loose gravel. You off-road pros will have no problem.

From the National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, submitted in Dec 1980 and approved in Dec 1981:

The Ruble Church (1854) is a rectangular, single-story, gable-roofed log structure measuring 15 feet by 25 feet. The building stands in a clearing on a remote, forested hilltop (elevation 1045 feet) in the Burning Springs vicinity of Wirt County, WV.
The Ruble Church is significant because it exhibits the well-preserved craftsmanship of the pre-Civil War hewn log construction in an original rural WV setting. The building is also significant because it was built as a philanthropic gesture by a locally prominent individual, Aaron S. Ruble, to serve the local religious and educational needs of a wilderness area in mid-19th century West Virginia. The land was donated by William Petty, and the deed to the land stipulated it was to be used “for a church to house the worship of God by all congregations, except the northern Methodists”. Indeed, the sign in front of the church states – “All are welcome here except those of Northern Principles.”
Examination of early surviving photographs of the building indicate that only minor changes have affected the original fabric. Its well preserved condition and recognition as a significant historic landmark in West Virginia suggest some measure of security for the Ruble Log Church. Nevertheless, while intermittent services held in the building by various nonsectarian users insures a small measure of upkeep, the edifice is empty throughout much of the year and must rely upon the assets of a sound roof and still plumb, heavy log walls for its future preservation.
Hewn logs, 12 – 15 inches square, rise from stone supports in 8 courses from sill to top log on each of the building’s four sides. Notching of the jointed log walls is half-dovetailed and is fairly deep accounting for the rather tight-fitting logs. Chinking is composed of stone fragments, short split boards, and clay. Broad axe marks are still clearly discernable on all of the log surfaces.
Finishing or facing boards around the door and window openings are of relatively recent origin, while braced window shutters on each of the 2 windows per side wall appear to faithfully duplicate the originals. A rear wall window, shuttered like the others, provides light for the church pulpit, and is in line with the building’s single doorway. The flush door is of laminate construction and is of very recent provenance.
The rood covering is of galvanized sheet metal with raised seams which replaced an original surface of rive-split wooden shingles. Framed gables are sided with weather-boarding and enclose a low, unused loft. An early photograph shows the entrance elevation clad entirely in weatherboarding, a not-uncommon feature of log buildings. A single façade was often so treated as an insulating factor against the frigid blast of prevailing winter winds.
The Ruble Church is in rather good condition, and appears on the exterior much as it looked following construction. Sill logs exhibit deterioration, however, and chinking material has disintegrated and fallen away from the building in many places.
Interior features of the building replaced rough, original surfaces which included “piececloth” windows and what has traditionally been referred to as log puncheon furniture. The tongue-in-groove board wainscoting, walls, ceiling, and pulpit are of uncertain date, though a period of construction on the early 20th or late 19th century seems very likely. The center aisle is flanked by plain benches with simple wooden backs, apparently of late manufacture. The gray painted pulpit is positioned on a low dais and is flanked to the right by an old upright piano. Kerosene lamps attached to the walls and a pot-bellied stove still provide lighting and heating for the church.



Historical Marker located on Rt 5 about 5 miles southeast of Elizabeth, at junction with CR 35/6 (Chestnut Road).






This sign is attached beneath the Historical Marker.





View eastbound on Rt 5. (CR 35/6 splits off to the left, Rt 5 continues on the right)






Ruble Church.





Another view of the church and cemetery.





Ruble Church - All are welcome here except those of Northern Principles.

For more photos and information on the Ruble Church: http://www.ruble-family.com/photo_player_flash3.html
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Old 04-02-2009, 04:32 PM   #245
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Elizabeth - Wirt Co

County Seat of Wirt County. Located on Rt 5 about 20 miles southeast of Parkersburg. Population 994.

Just a mile or two south is Palestine, hometown of Private Jessica Lynch.

For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth,_West_Virginia



Historical Marker located in front of the Wirt County Court House in downtown Elizabeth.



Beautiful downtown Elizabeth.
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Old 04-03-2009, 07:27 AM   #246
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brooke county

well i think i hit them all, but still on the lookout


right in front the marker for wellsburg facing north DOH!!! how did i miss this one?????



the warf where i caught a 28 pound carp on a fly rod






facing south the ohio river

facing north


the sign for DO NOT FEED THE DAMMN GEESE

route 2 wellsburg by banner fireboard


here is the cemetary where all the famous dead people are






these are pics from the top of the hill over looking wellsburg
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Old 04-03-2009, 08:25 PM   #247
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Quote:
Originally Posted by face_plant
well i think i hit them all, but still on the lookout
the warf where i caught a 28 pound carp on a fly rod







Ive been going to the wharf to eat my DiCarlos pizza for 25 years. I like to sit there and watch the sun set as the barges slip through the water. The Brilliant Boat Club is directly across the river from the wharf in Brilliant, OH.

One of my good friends is a descendant of Patrick Gass. His middle name is actually "Gass". His grandfather is a local historian who does periodic traveling tours of historic sites.
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Old 04-04-2009, 05:03 PM   #248
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Harrisville - Ritchie Co

Located about 25 miles east of Parkersburg and about 5 miles south of Rt 50 on Rt 16. County seat of Ritchie Co. Population 1,842. Claim to fame: Home of Berdine's Five and Dime.


For more information on Harrisville: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrisville,_West_Virginia


I once heard Rt 16 referred to as "Sweet 16", and now I know why. I was only on the first 5 miles south of Rt 50, but I want to go back and ride further south.




Historical Marker located on Rt 16 in downtown Harrisville.





View northeast through Harrisville.




View southwest through Harrisville. Nice old town.

Like I said earlier, I'll be back to ride Rt 16 south.
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Old 04-05-2009, 04:55 AM   #249
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Pennsboro - Ritchie Co

Located just north of Rt 50 about 30 miles east of Parkersburg at junction with Rt 74. Population 1,199. Home of the Pennsboro Speedway, a 1/2-Mile clay oval racetrack.

For more information on Pennsboro: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsboro,_West_Virginia


For more information for Pennsboro Speedway: http://www.racefan.com/showtrack.asp?id=181




Historical Marker located on Rt 74 as it passes through Pennsboro. It's well-hidden behind other road signs and utility poles. (see next photo)




View north-west on Rt 74. See what I mean about the sign being hidden?




Where's the marker? Oh yeah, behind the poles and signs. Who put those Rt 74 signs there?????
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Old 04-05-2009, 05:04 AM   #250
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Old Stone House - Pennsboro - Ritchie Co

Located in Pennsboro, about 30 miles east of Parkersburg just north of Rt 50. Today, it appears the house is a museum.

To find out more about the Old Stone House: http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM4M6G



Historical Marker located on Rt 74 as it passes through Pennsboro, about 100 meters north of the previous "Pennsboro" marker.





The Old Stone House.




View north-west on Rt 74 as it passes the house.
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Old 04-05-2009, 02:23 PM   #251
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Two NICE days of weather = lots of riding around finding historical markers. A few are duplicates, but I'm going to post them anyways.

First up is the town of Grafton. Seems to be a lot of history in this little old town. Possibly most famous for Anna Jarvis, the "mother" of Mother's Day. Secondly most famous, at least to motorcycle riders, are the roads in the area. Twisty, with elevation changes, light traffic and reasonable condition.



In the same area as the Grafton marker is one for the Federal Dam. The dam was constructed to stop flooding in the neighboring valleys. Today, it holds back the 4000 acre Tygart Lake.



These markers can be found at the US 50 & US 119 intersection.

Later,
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Old 04-05-2009, 02:30 PM   #252
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Heading west on US 50, you'll come to the "Old Catholic Cemetery" located just across the road from Grafton City Hospital. Lots of old graves from Grafton's early settlers. Buried here is John Taylor's father. John Taylor is the name sake for Taylor county where Grafton is located. This marker was first pictured in December of 2008. Since then, the marker has leaned considerably.





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Old 04-05-2009, 02:33 PM   #253
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Continuing on US 50, you'll come to the WV 310 junction near Prunytown. The marker here is Valley Falls which calls attention to the natural beauty of the area. Gorgeous scenery around. I'm definitely bringing the misses back here soon. If you keep on zipping by, don't ride into the river while you're staring at it!



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Old 04-05-2009, 02:43 PM   #254
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***EDIT*** For more information on this bridge itself, see post #281 in this thread.

Today, I decided to ride the same route as yesterday, only in reverse this time. Due to time restraints, I couldn't stop and admire the markers in Marion County, and I realized I missed the Taylor county Marker on 119.

So, first up was the Dent's Run Covered Bridge Marker just a few miles south of Morgantown on US 19. See post #281 for directions and pictures of the bridge.



Amazing though that any bridge 40 ft long could only cost $448! Guess the dollar went a lot farther in 1889.

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Old 04-05-2009, 02:53 PM   #255
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Continuing south, I came to the Marion/Monongalia county line. The county marker is leaning significantly, most likely due to land slippage as opposed to damage.







Across US 19 is the marker for Jone's Raid. Searching Google, yielded a WONDERFUL article from the Fairmont Times, circa April 28,1904. PLEASE read this!

Quote:
Confederates Capture Fairmont

Fairmont Times
April 28, 1904


Exciting Scenes There Were When Jones' Raiders Came To Town 41 Years Ago To-Day
Then The Only Real Battle Of The War On Marion Soil Was Fought
Some Brave People And What They Did - Governor Pierpont's Bible.
Forty-one years ago to-day the only event of any importance which transpired in Fairmont during the War of the Rebellion took place. It was the raid of the Confederate General Jones, who entered the town with four thousand men and during the day burned the railroad bridge at Johntown and caused the first blood in Marion county during the war to be shed.
It was early in the morning when the army arrived and for the most part every body in the county were aware of the fact that this place would be visited by the daring raider.
For days and days previous to the coming of the rebels the local people had been making preparations for their reception.
Almost a week before hand, word was received here that the army was heading this way, but at first very few believed it and not much activity was shown in making a defense.
The wiser heads in the county, however, hid every thing of value and then either scooted out of [sic] went to join the Home Guards which were hastilty [sic] organized to protect the town.
The night before the rebels got here there was great excitement in the town.
Rumors of foul murder had reached the ears of the people and every one thought there would be a general massacre on the morrow.
There are dozens and dozens of youngsters whose bravery was shattered to the wind the very moment the army left Morgantown and headed this way. During the night one could see them scooting out to the tall woods to lay in hiding until the last single military gray coat had left the town.
Several young fellows of the town, several of whom are still living, hid in an old vacant mine near Barnsville for thirty-six hours and when they ventured out they were half starved.
The raiders came from Morgantown where they had foraged almost every thing of value in that town. During the time they were there about two hundred and fiftey [sic] horses were stolen in the county and the losses to store keepers in Morgantown amounted to about five thousand dollars.
The rebels entered the town early in the morning and proceeded to make a general clean up.
At Barnsville and other little towns in the vicinity every thing of value in sight was foraged and many a man was compelled to exchange his good horse for a poor old worn out animal, many of which died the next day.
A large number of barns were found empty, however, the owners having taken the precaution to hide their stock.
The floor in the bridge crossing Buffalo Creek, at Barnsville was torn up by the raiders to keep off pursuit.
At the time of the raid the office of F. H. Pierpont, the Union Governor of Virginia was in this place.
The raiders broke in his library and burned his books and papers in the streets.
An old bible, which the Governor prized highly was tied to the tail of an officer's horse and dragged through the mud of the streets. This act incensed the citizens more than anything else and it was mere luck that the officer who had committed this act was not shot by some enraged citizen.
During the day a part of the army went to Johntown, where the railroad bridge was burned.
At that time the Home Guard and a company of New York Volunteers which were stationed here to guard the bridge engaged the rebels in a skirmish. This lasted all evening and one man was killed and several wounded. The little crowd of defenders were finally captured and placed as prisoners in the court house, where they were kept until the army left.
The soldier killed was a member of the New York Company and his bodie [sic] lay on the battle field until the next day, before it was removed.
At the time of the raid there was a large force of Union men at Grafton and some at Clarksburg. Whether or not these were sent for is not known.
Mulligan's battery arrived during the evening but they were too late for the rebels had taken their departure.
While here they broke in several stores and took about everything in them.
A certain shoe dealer, who kept a shoe and boot store on the corner of Main and Quincy streets happened to be out of town at the time of the raid, and when he returned he found his store open and nearly every pair of shoes and boots he had in the house were taken. In exchange were about a hundred pairs of old, worn and torn boots that never could be repaired.
An incident of the raid is related on a Fairmont woman who was a young girl at that time.
Her brother had been shot through the head during the skirmish and she decided she would go up and bring him home.
There wasn't an available horse in the neighborhood so she got a light buggy and together with another girl, pulled it on the field where the fight was going on.
They went into the thickest of the fight and loaded the wounded man in the buggy and pulled him back to town.
Jones' raid will always be remembered in Fairmont as the ony time Marion county was ever touched by a hostile army.


Fairmont Times
April 29, 1905
Not Bible, the Flag.
A friend of The Times calls attention to an error in the account of Jones' raid, printed yesterday. It was the flag taken from Governor Pierpont's house, not the family Bible, that was dragged through the streets by the members of Jones' command, who, this gentleman says, was a set of gentlemen, coming from old Virginia.




Later,
Chrome...
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