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Old 04-07-2009, 08:25 PM   #271
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Spy Rock (Fayette Co)

Got a little lost this past weekend and was beatin' feet to get home when I went past this sign. I looked about for the rock but to no avail, Wiki states it is somewhat hidden or might've been pulverized during US60 construction. BTW, this was my fist ride on the Midland Trail (what a great set of twisties), I had joined it in Rainelle ... be careful of the GPS' directions!

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Old 04-08-2009, 05:27 PM   #272
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Withers Grave - Lewis Co

I missed this one when I was down in Weston a month or so ago. Alexander Scott Withers was born in 1792 near Parkersburg WV, and was the author of "Chronicles of Border Warfare" (1831), a history of conflicts between the white man and native Indians in western Virginia. He is buried on a hillside along the south end of downtown Weston.

For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Scott_Withers





Historical marker located on the northbound lane of Rt 19 as the road splits entering downtown Weston.





Be careful if you want to stop here - the road is narrow and the trucks are wide! Watch out for the quicksand disguised as mud on the edge of the road. (Don't ask me how I know this ) The cemetery is on the hillside to the right. Go straight ahead from the marker about 100 meters and turn right up a steep street. The entrance to the cemetery is just off the highway.




View of the cemetery from the entrance at the bottom of the hill. Withers' grave is up the hill to the left.





Gravestone of Alexander Scott Withers.
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Old 04-09-2009, 02:45 AM   #273
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Pleasants Co - Ohio : Bridge across the Ohio River

Rt 807 crosses the Ohio River from Rt 2 Pleasants Co on the south side of St Marys over to Newport, OH.

The former bridge, located just north of the present one, was almost identical to the Point Pleasant Silver Bridge which collapsed in 1967, killing 46 people. The former bridge was then closed and later removed. Construction began in June 1973 with the pouring of the mid-river pier, and finished in Nov 1977, an agonizing 4+ years wait for the local citizens of Newport OH and St Marys WV.

For more information on the bridge:

http://www.lindapages.com/pleasants/...nterbridge.htm

http://www.newportohiohistory.com/subpage124.html


For photos of the original bridge at opening in the 1920s:

http://www.newportohiohistory.com/subpage42.html





Historical Marker located at the WV end of the bridge at the junction of Rt 2 and Rt 807. (Side #1 - westbound toward Ohio)




Same marker (Side #2 - eastbound from Ohio into WV)





Plaque dedicated to Hi Carpenter, designer of the original bridge.




View of the current bridge. Looking west across the Ohio River.





It was hard to get a good photo of the entire bridge, so I stopped on Rt 16 heading out of St Marys at the top of the hill and took this photo. Not the best, but you get an idea of the size.

It's starting to rain and I'm 60 miles from home. See ya'.
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Old 04-10-2009, 02:59 AM   #274
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Greenbrier Church and Cemetery - Doddridge Co

Located south-west of Weston about 6 miles. From Weston, follow CR 29 south to the Doddridge Co line. At the top of the hill, CR 17 splits off to the right. Follow it west for about 2 miles.

I could not find any information about this cemetery or church. If I find something later, I'll come back and add it.

It's a nice ride back to this area. Narrow, winding roads, but well worth the detour off Rt 50.





Historical Marker located on CR 17 about 2 miles west of the junction with CR 15/29.





View of the Cemetery. The church is gone - no sign of any parts of it.





View westbound on CR 17.
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Old 04-10-2009, 03:15 AM   #275
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Doddridge Co / Ritchie Co Line - Old Rt 50

Old Rt 50 was the main east-west route through this part of WV when I was growing up. A trip from Clarksburg to Parkersburg and back was an all-day event. Now, the 4-lane makes it an hour and 15 minute ride. There are scattered remnants of the old 2-lane here and there along the current 4-lane, offering a glimpse into the past.

Rt 50 was once a coast to coast 2-lane road, extending from Ocean City, MD to Sacremento, CA. 3,073 miles

This section of Old Rt 50 parallels the new road from about Greenwood to Ellensboro. The marker is located just east of Toll Gate.





Historical Marker located on Old Rt 50 1 mile east of Toll Gate. (Side #1 - eastbound into Doddridge Co)





View eastbound on Old Rt 50 entering Doddridge Co.





Same Marker - Side #2. Westbound on Old Rt 50 heading into Ritchie Co.




View westbound on Old Rt 50 entering Ritchie Co.
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Old 04-10-2009, 06:29 PM   #276
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Taylor Co / Preston Co Line - Rt 50

Located on Rt 50 about 6 or 8 miles east of Grafton. From here to the MD border is a great ride!! Whereas Rt 50 west of Clarksburg is 4-lane, it's good ol' twisty 2-lane from Clarksburg east to MD.

For more information on Preston Co:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preston..._West_Virginia

http://www.prestoncounty.com/

For more information on Taylor Co:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_..._West_Virginia

http://www.taylorcountywestvirginia.com/






Historical Marker located on Rt 50 east of Grafton. (Side #1 - eastbound entering Preston Co). Perhaps my favorite memory of Preston Co is the annual Buckwheat Festival in Kingwood. I haven't been home to go to it for over 25 years. Maybe this year.




Rt 50 eastbound entering Preston Co.





Same marker - (Side #2). Westbound on Rt 50 entering Taylor Co.




View westbound on Rt 50 entering Taylor Co.
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Old 04-12-2009, 05:04 PM   #277
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B&O Viaducts - Preston Co

Located on Rt 72 about 1 mile north of Rowlesburg (and about 5 miles north of Rt 50) along the west bank of the Cheat River.

The first all-iron trestles in America were in the B&O Railroad, the work of Albert Fink in 1853. They were the Tray Run and Buckeye Run Viaducts along the Cheat River, which were entirely of cast iron, except for the bracing rods. Tray Run Viaduct was 58 feet high, 445 feet long. Buckeye Run Viaduct was 46 feet high and 350 feet long. Both had 28-foot deck widths. They were founded on continuous masonry walls, with expansion points at intervals of 125 feet. The intention at first was to build the walls up to grade, but cast iron trestles were used instead. Tray Run Viaduct was replaced in 1887 by modern steel trestle, and Buckeye Run Viaduct was removed in 1885 and side walls built up to grade.


Notes from the Historic American Engineering Record, National Park Service, Department of the Interior :




Fink's cast-iron viaducts for the Baltimore and Ohio at Tray Runand Buckeye Run (1851-1852) were important steps in the evolution of iron construction. Derived from traditional timber forms, they were an important first step in translating those techniques into metal structures. The size and shape of their members and the details of their connections provided later engineers with a grammar of construction on which more advanced forms were based. Between 1851 and 1875, American engineers built upon Fink's precedents to produce a number of similar structures with even more impressive proportions.

The influence of these works illustrates an important aspect of the development of structural engineering, namely, that the overall forms of structural designs are based on numerous small innovations in construction details. In this respect, the impact of these viaducts was direct as well as indirect. A number of engineers who were associated with Fink on the B&O, and later on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, went on to build similar structures.

On the other hand, the two viaducts received considerable attention in the professional literature, and Fink's drawings were publicized in Europe and America. It is impossible to tell just what impact this literary dissemination may have had, but it is possible that it influenced the design of at least one famous British viaduct.

Perhaps the most important influence of these pioneering works was felt beyond the scope of the railroads. By the late 1860's, Fink's linear continuous iron trestles had evolved into a series of free-standing, independently braced towers connected by short truss spans. In effect, towers such as these were metal cages whose construction anticipated the use of similar technology in the high-rise buildings of the 1880's.

The scenario for Tray Run and Buckeye Run Viaducts was set by
the conjunction of geography and financial difficulty. The B&O was in a squeeze to complete the line to Wheeling by January 1, 1853, or risk losing its Virginia charter. Chief Engineer Benjamin H. Latrobe was straining his resources against the Alleghenies while President Swann held creditors at bay with, elegant speeches. While work proceeded from both ends of the line, the structures of the greatest engineering difficulty progressed simultaneously at various points.

The Cheat River Grade was one of the more awe-inspiring of these areas of special difficulty. After crossing one of Fink's bridges at Rowlesburg, the line began its ascent of the ridge which rises steeply from the west bank of the Cheat. This ridge has the form of a scallop in which each indentation carries a small brook into the river. Between these ravines, the projecting hills slope at a high angle. In order to make the track as straight as possible, the B&O's engineers decided to cross these ravines at their mouths instead of snaking the line into the canyons and back out again. Since the amount of water in Tray Run and Buckeye Run was small, the original plan called for construction of a solid masonry embankment with a culvert to carry the water under the road. According to one source, the intention to build the masonry wall to the level of the roadbed was abandoned after the partially-built structure showed signs of weakness. Time was another factor that weighed against the all-masonry plan. The deadline for completion of the road was rapidly approaching, and the engineers decided to terminate the masonry at Tray Run, 90 feet above the level of the stream, and to complete the viaduct with a cast-iron trestle.

When time came to assign responsibility for the viaduct's design, Latrobe faced a dilemma. He had at his disposal both Albert Fink and Wendel Bollman, two men of exceptional talent. Each had considerable experience in cast-iron structures by this time, and both had patented designs for trusses. Bollman's model had been the basis for bridges between Harper's Ferry and Cumberland. Fink, although he had been with the B&O less than three years, had built the two-bridge span over the Cheat at nearby Rowlesburg and was at work on the Great Iron Bridge,
then under construction over the Monongahela at Fairmont. The designs of both men had won Latrobe's confidence - Bellman's through practice and Fink's mainly through its basis in sound theory. Latrobe's problem was exacerbated by the rivalry (friendly?) which had sprung up between the older Bollman and the young German engineer. The precocious Fink (then 24 years old) had excellent scientific training behind him and was out to prove his worth, on a practical level. Bollman, on the other hand, had been with the company for 20 years. The degree of competition between the two has never been documented. Yet it would be hard to imagine such a situation in which some competitive spirit on both sides would not make the decision a difficult one for the chief engineer.

Latrobe's problem was solved in part by sheer geography. Construction of the Kingwood Tunnel was proceeding with, difficulty, making major demands on Bollman's time. Fink, on th.e other hand, was working more closely with the Mt. Clare foundry in the process of casting the members for his bridge at Fairmount. It was logical that under these circumstances, Fink be placed in charge of the two viaducts as well. As in the case of the Fairmont Bridge, he responded admirably.

The work of Albert Fink is an outstanding example of the transfer of European technology to America. The immigrant son of a German architect, Fink studied engineering and architecture at the Polytechnic School of Darmstadt. After graduating in 1848, he worked for one year for the Offenbach firm before his enthusiasm for the German revolutionary movement forced him to leave the country. Like many of the so called "48-ers", Fink and his brother Henry found their way to the United States, arriving at the port of New York in the spring of 1849. There they sought professional employment in various architectural and engineering firms with no success. After a similarly discouraging stay in Philadelphia, they moved on to Baltimore, where the B&O was beginning construction on its line from Cumberland to Wheeling. After some initial disappointment, Latrobe hired Albert Fink in December as a draftsman in the Baltimore office. Fink impressed the chief engineer and rose rapidly in the department, becoming one of Latrobe's principal assistants. In 1854, he patented his famous design for iron truss bridges. Between 1851 and 1857, many examples of Fink's truss were built by the railroad on the line between Cumberland and Wheeling, and later on the Parkersburg Branch (Northwestern Virginia Railroad). After the Civil War, it was used exclusively on lines in the western U.S. and abroad. From 1851 to 1857, Fink was actively engaged in experimental work for the B&O on prefabricated metal structures. His bridge over the Monongahela River at Fairmont (1852-1853) was the second largest iron railroad bridge in the world (the longest was Steven's tubular bridge over the Menai Straits in Britain) and brought him international recognition.


For more information : (lots of information - 15 pages of history!)

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/w...ata/wv0112.pdf





Historical Marker located on Rt 72 about 1 mile north of Rowlesburg (west bank of Cheat River)




View of Buckeye Run Viaduct and Buckeye Run. Hard to get a good photo looking almost directly into the sun. For a good photo, come in the morning.





A different angle - view of Buckeye Run Viaduct.





View of Rt 72 southbound heading into Rowlesburg. Cheat River to the left.
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Old 04-13-2009, 05:59 PM   #278
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Aurora - Preston Co

Located on Rt 50 about 6 - 8 miles west of the Maryland border, and about 2 - 3 miles east of "the dropoff" (as I call it), where Rt 50 twists and curves its way down to Erwin (arguably 3 miles of some of the most entertaining riding in WV). Unincorporated town - elevation 2,644. Population?? I would guess a few hundred. There is a US Post Office there, though. Originally a German settlement. Name may have been chosen because of it's high elevation.





Historical Marker located on Rt 50 just east of the stone church and post office.





View westbound on Rt 50 through Aurora.




View to the north side of Aurora as you enter eastbound on Rt 50. Lots of scenic farms around here.
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Old 04-14-2009, 05:42 PM   #279
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Gantz Sand - Preston Co

Located on the east edge of Aurora WV along Rt 50, next to the Aurora School, about 6-8 miles west of the MD border.

The Gantz Sand formation was initially discovered in PA, so here are some notes that include PA geology.

Notes from PA Department of Conservation and Resources:

Petroleum exploration began in Washington County PA in 1881, 100 years after the county was formed from a portion of Westmoreland County. The county seat, the city of Washington, is affectionately known as “Little” Washington to distinguish it from Washington, D.C. A handful of natural gas wells drilled in the northwestern section of Washington County in the early 1880s inspired the residents of Little Washington to drill gas wells that would provide residential heating and lighting. They had a limited amount of success.

By the fall of 1885, three wells, the Gantz well, Gordon well, and Gabby well, had penetrated Upper Devonian geologic rock units comparable to those penetrated by the McGuigan well. The only problem was that these three wells did not produce natural gas; instead, they struck oil! In fact, the Gantz and Gordon wells are considered “discovery” wells because their locations were the first ones at which the geologic units penetrated by the wells were tapped for oil.

The Citizens Natural Gas Company completed the Gantz well to a depth of 2,191 feet on January 1, 1885. The lowest 20 feet of this well was drilled through a fine- to coarse-grained, coffee-colored sandstone that yielded approximately 50 barrels of oil per day during drilling and sustained flows on the order of 20 barrels per day once it was completed. On March 7, 1885, the first oil ever shipped from Washington County came from this well. The Gantz well was located at Gantzs Mill near the Pennsylvania Railroad Freight Station in Washington. The oil-producing rock unit was named the Gantz sand after the farm on which the well was drilled. This well has particular acclaim because it was the first commercially productive oil well in Washington County and the first well situated in what is now known as the Washington-Taylorstown oil field.

From US Geological Survey:

At an average distance of 1,916 feet below the Pittsburg coal the Gantz sand is struck. It is usually 15 to 25 feet thick, and produces both gas and oil. It is so closely underlain by the Fifty-foot sand that the two are frequently recorded as continuous. It is very probable that the shale between these two .sands becomes very thin in some localities, and gives way to shaly sandstone. In such cases the driller records a thickness of 50 to 100 feet for one of the sands, and makes no mention of the other.

The horizon of these sands is occupied in Armstrong and other counties by a heavy, continuous deposit known as the Hundred-foot sand, a term which is little used in Greene County. The Gantz sand takes its name from a well on the Gantz farm, Franklin Township, Washington County, Pa., which was drilled in 1885, and was the first paying oil well in the county.






Historical Marker located on Rt 50 on the east side of Aurora. Marker could use a little TLC.




View of marker looking westbound on Rt 50.





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Old 04-16-2009, 05:39 PM   #280
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Old Stone Tavern - Preston Co

Located a mile east of Aurora WV and about 5 miles west of the MD border on Rt 50. Rt 50 is a GREAT ride from all points Grafton eastward.

Notes from the Nomination Form for the National Register for Historic Places. http://www.wvculture.org/shpo/nr/pdf...n/73001923.pdf

Between 1825 and 1827 a stone house was constructed near the settlement then known as German Settlement, now known as Aurora in Preston County, Virginia, now West Virginia. It was built by Henry Grimes as a dwelling, in 1841 when the Northwestern Turnpike reached the community it was opened as a public inn to serve travelers along the turnpike. It was known as the Old Stone Inn, or the Red Horse Tavern; later it became known as Brookside for the community in which it is located.

The building is of typical Pennsylvania German construction and consists of a main part containing one large downstairs room and three upstairs rooms with an attic above them. There are two circular staircases in this part. In a smaller one-room portion of the house there is a built-in bar, with a large fireplace and: cupboards on either side of the fireplace. The main room also has a large fireplace, and there is one on the second floor, all three served by a common chimney with separate flues.

Walls were constructed of rubble stone and are two feet in thickness on the lower story and one foot, six inches thick on the upper story. Save for necessary minor mending, these walls are intact at present. The two parts of the house have trapdoors which lead to a full basement.

The use of wood is consistent and of suitable selection throughout the entire house. Most of the original timbers remain in place. First floor beams and flooring are of oak; second floor and attic beams are of hemlock and the flooring of pine. The roof, rafters, beams and roof strips are all of oak. Shingles were probably originally white oak "shakes"; now the roofing is hand riven cedar.

The window frames, sash, trim, doors, door frames, stairs and the three fireplace mantels are of yellow poplar. All of the wood portions of the house seem to be original except for a few repairs and the cedar shingles on the roof. The entire interior of the house has been repair-plastered and whitewashed. A notable furniture addition is a built-in four-door, eight-drawer cherry cupboard in the largest upstairs room.

Efforts have been made to keep the entire property intact, using as much of the original furniture as has been possible and replacing it when necessary with pieces suitable to the period and construction. The present owner's artistic bent is attested by a fine collection of American paintings now housed in the building.

In 1827 the Virginia General Assembly passed an act incorporating the Northwestern Turnpike to run from Winchester in the Shenandoah Valley to Parkersburg on the Ohio River. This was to be Virginia's answer to the National Road a short distance northward in Maryland and Pennsylvania. When the new turnpike, after some necessary adjustments in route, reached the area in which Henry Grimes had constructed his stone house, the building was opened as an inn to accommodate the traveling public. Since a built-in bar was already in place, and since there was a large common room in the main portion of the house, the building was well suited to such a need.

To construct and oversee the engineering problems of this new highway, Virginia retained the services of Colonel Claudius Crozet, a Frenchman who had served with distinction as an artillery officer in Napoleon's Grand Army. After Napoleon's exile, Crozet, with other French officers, emigrated to America, and Crozet served as an instructor at the West Point Military Academy. Crozet had the task of building a highway which traversed all of the Allegheny ridges between the Shenandoah and the Ohio River. In his necessary travels there is evidence that he stopped at the Grimes home which, in 1841, had been adapted to tavern use.

During the years before the Civil War, travel was very heavy on the Northwestern Turnpike since it traversed the mountain ridges on easier grades than did the National Road. The Red Horse Tavern was one of the most heavily used on the entire turnpike, and many notable persons stopped there in passage between the Middle West and the East.

When the Civil War years came the Northwestern Turnpike was useful for the movement of troops. Most of the local residents were of Union sympathies, and during periods of Confederate raids or heavy bushwhacker activity the heavily wooded premises of the Red Horse Tavern were used by local people as a place of concealment for their horses and other livestock.

The Red Horse Tavern, also known as the Old Stone House, served as post office for the community. Early federal post office records show that in one year William H. Grimes received $65.50.as compensation for his services as postmaster at German Settlement, Preston County, Virginia.




Historical Marker located on Rt 50 about 1 mile east of Aurora and about 5 miles west of the MD border.





View eastbound on Rt 50.





I believe there were renovations in progress. Lots of building materials laying around. I guess a house that's almost 200 years old needs some occasional upkeep.
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Old 04-17-2009, 09:55 PM   #281
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**EDIT** For pictures of the marker itself, see post #254.

After speaking to a few people about the Dent's Run Covered Bridge, I was able to narrow down the location and made it out on the 16th. While at the marker on Rt. 19 you will actually head north west on Laurel Point-Cassville Road which later turns into Sugar Grove Rd. Don't worry about the names or direction it's the only road by the marker that isn't Rt 19 and it starts at the marker. About 0.6 miles from the marker, you will see a sign on the rigth for the bridge and a small sign for John Fox Road. Turning left onto the road will look like you are pulling in someones driveway as its very close to a house.

GPS: N 39 37.435 W 080 02.425










On a side note, if you decide to take Chaplin Road / Co Hwy 19/24 back to the I-79 Star City exit, the pavement is in terrible condition with edge traps and unavoidable (in your own lane) pot holes. Definitely don't take your sport bike through.

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Old 04-19-2009, 06:16 PM   #282
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St. Georges Church is located on Smoke Hole Road (CR 2) five miles from junction with US 220. This is an AMAZING road. Turn up hill just before the marker for another great road. This is a repost, see post #133 for more information and pictures of this church.

I was on a group ride, so you can find my bike in the back of the back there.







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Old 04-20-2009, 11:31 AM   #283
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That covered bridge is super cool and picturesque.

Pnoman judging from the pictures in your posts this game could be called the Finding hairy places along the side of a narrow road with no shoulder to pull over. Luckily a lot of these are in rural lightly traveled areas.

It's too bad they don't have little pull off's at each one of these markers so people can actually pull over to read some history and enjoy the view for a few minutes.
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Old 04-20-2009, 02:03 PM   #284
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Beverly - Randolph Co

The town of Beverly is located about 8 miles south of Elkins on Rt 219/250/55/92. Population 646. Historic because of it's proximity to Rich Mt Battlefield (see upcoming post).

For a complete history of Beverly (Be sure to also click the "Historic Beverly" link at the top of the page) :

http://www.richmountain.org/beverly.htm





Historical Marker located along Rt 219/250 in downtown area (1 block south of turnoff for Rich Mt Battlefield).





View north along Rt 219/250 through Beverly. (The marker for Rich Mt Battlefield road is barely visible about 100 meters ahead on the left). The rock monument to the right is the City Square.





Better view of the monument.





Plaque on the monument tells about Beverly and Rich Mt.




An information plaque tells more about the City Square.





Directly across the street is the old Blackman-Bosworth Store.




Blackman-Bosworth Store.




The old bank building, located just south of the City Square. I've always admired this building (and, of course, it's contents ) every time I ride by.
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Old 04-20-2009, 04:16 PM   #285
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Rich Mt Battlefield / Hart House - Randolph Co

OK, I'm going to say it again - I am not a history expert. I want to learn more, and this thread is helping me (and hopefully others) learn more about our past. Now that's out of the way, let's go.

In the early days of the American Civil War, control of main transportation routes was a goal of both sides. Following their hasty retreat from Philippi in June 1861, Confederate troops under the command of Confederate Gen Robert Garnett established a fortified stronghold on the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike at the summit of Rich Mt., located about 5 miles west of Beverly. The camp had 1300 men and was under the command of Lt Col John Pegram.

Union Maj. Gen. George McClellan, charged with securing all of the loyal counties in western VA, brought 5000 men to Roaring Creek Flats, about 2 miles west of Camp McClellan.

David Hart, a 22-year-old man, volunteered to lead the Union forces on an attack to the rear of the Confederate stronghold. In the early morning hours of July 11th, Union forces under the command of Brig. Gen. William Rosencrans, made their way through rain, thick forest and steep ridges, where they encountered a small force of about 310 men guarding the summit at the Hart homestead. After a 2-hour battle, Rosencran's forces gained control of the summit. Realizing they were outnumbered, Col. Pegram ordered the withdrawl of Confederate forces that night.

The following morning, July 12th, Rosencran's Union forces entered the abandoned camp. Except for scattered raids, the Confederates were expelled from the region for the remainder of the Civil War.

For a more thorough history of the area, click the following links:

http://www.richmountain.org/


http://www.richmountain.org/battle.htm


http://americancivilwar.com/statepic/wv/wv003.html




CR 37-8 starts in Beverly and goes westbound 5 miles to the summit of Rich Mt. The first 3 miles are paved, the last 2 miles are hard-packed dirt/gravel. I'm not really comfortable on gravel roads, but this one wasn't bad at all. I figure you could even get a Gold-Wing up here if you wanted. Here is the sign marking the entrance to the battlefield.





Historical Marker located at the summit of Rich Mt on CR 37-8. (Side #1)




Same marker (Side #2)




View of marker looking east, heading down the mountain back into Beverly. The Hart House and battlefield are to the right in this photo.






The summit and battlefield. The Historical Marker and Hart House monument are just past the utility pole on the left.





One of the informative signs along the summit.



Information on the Hart House, home of David Hart, who guided the Union troops up the mountain to surprise the Confederates.




Stone monument marking the location of the Hart House.





Close-up of Hart House monument.






Information on Brig Gen Rosencrans, leader of the Union forces' surprise attack.





Information on the stable yard along the summit.



View of the stable yard.


Well, I hope I got every thing correct. If not, you historians out there feel free to PM me and I'll make any necessary corrections. Boy, I feel a whole lot smarter than I did a few hours ago. Hope the feeling lasts a while.
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pnoman screwed with this post 04-20-2009 at 04:23 PM
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