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Old 09-14-2009, 08:10 AM   #916
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Fayette Co. Layland Mine Disaster

Located on Rt41.

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Old 09-14-2009, 08:20 AM   #917
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Fayette Co. Layland Mone Disaster

The following miners were killed in the Layland Mine Explosion,
Layland, West Virginia, on March 2, 1915. These miners were immigrants
from Italy and other European Countries. All are buried in the
St. Mary's Cemetery in Hinton, West Virginia.
BENGIG, Andy; died Mar. 2, 1915
BENGIG, George; died Mar. 2, 1915
CAROLLO, Salvatore; born Dec. 25, 1887, died Mar. 2, 1915,
age 27 y, 6m, 5d, born in Corini, Italia.
GIAPANNO, Antonio; born Nov. 15, 1882, died Mar. 2, 1915
GIOVINE, Nella; died Mar. 2, 1915, age 29
GREGOVITCH, Andrea; died Mar. 2, 1915
LIGGIERI, Mimichile; born Dec. 15, 1899?, died Mar. 2, 1915,
born Corini, Italia
MARGIANO, Carlo; died Mar. 2, 1915
MARINUCCI, Giuseppa; died Mar. 2, 1915
MORIGI, Paolo; born Nov. 15, 1877, died Mar. 2, 1915, born
Corini, Italia
PLESHA, Steve; died Mar. 2, 1915
POTAIN, Andy; died Mar. 2, 1915
SCOLOCITZ, Louis; died Mar. 2, 1915
SOVIC, Frank; died Mar. 2, 1915, age 28y
SPOLORIC, Toni; died Mar. 2, 1915
ZUFFINETTI, Carlo; born Dec. 13, 1878, died Mar. 2, 1915,
born Italia
[Information taken from the
Summers County Historical Society Cemetery
Book
, published 1996.]



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Old 09-15-2009, 05:25 AM   #918
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Mason County- Lost Colony- RT35 in Southside-3 mi North of Putnam county line. Its actually at the Southside Community Center about 9 miles north of the county line.

Facing south
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Old 09-15-2009, 05:27 AM   #919
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Facing North
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Old 09-15-2009, 05:29 AM   #920
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I also looked for the General McCausland marker that is supposed to be 1/2 mile north of the putnam line on Rt35. I couldnt find it. There is still a really old farm house at the 1/2-3/4 mile area that I think is the McCausland farm. The produce stand is gone, but there is still a McCausland produce stand sign. I was going to stop at the house & ask or see if the marker is at the house but the drive way is gated.
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Old 09-15-2009, 05:31 AM   #921
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Clendenin - Kanawha Co

Had a GREAT ride this past weekend (Sept 12-13) Headed south to Charleston/Logan/Matewan/Williamson/Huntington/Pt Pleasant/Parkersburg/home (Clarksburg). Saw lots of neat places, rode lots of great roads, met some interesting people -- life is good!

Let's get started.

Clendenin - Located on Rt 119 about 20 miles northeast of Charleston (off of I-79, Exit 19). Population - 1,116. Site of world's first petrochemical plant in 1920 - Union Carbide. To read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clendenin,_West_Virginia




Marker located in downtown Clendenin - east of Rt 119, across bridge, turn north into downtown.




Same marker - Side #2

About Col George Clendenin: Charleston, the county seat and currently the state's most populous city and state capital, was founded on land that was originally owned by Colonel Thomas Bullitt. In 1774, he was deeded 1,240 acres of land on the Great Kanawha River by the mouth of the Elk River for his service during the French and Indian Wars (1754-1763). He sold the land to his brother, Judge Cuthbert Bullitt, President of the Virginia Court of Appeals who, in turn, sold the land, in 1786, to Colonel George Clendenin, a distinguished frontiersmen and soldier in General Lewis' army at the decisive Battle of Point Pleasant (1774). It is said that the land on which Charleston currently stands was sold for 84 cents.

Colonel Clendenin, his father Charles, his brothers and sister, and six other families moved to the mouth of Elk River, at the present site of Charleston in 1788 and
built the first building within the boundaries of what is now the state capital. The two-story, double log building was known as being both bullet and arrow proof and
was known as Clendenin's Fort. The first meeting of the county court took place there on October 5, 1789. The Virginia Assembly chartered the town on December 19, 1794 and named it Charles Town, in honor of Charles Clendenin. The town's name was shortened to Charleston to avoid confusion with two other towns that were also called Charles Town.

Daniel Boone (1734-1820), the famous frontiersmen and founder of Kentucky, resided with his family in Kanawha County for seven years (1788-1795), in a two-room log cabin in the Kanawha City section of Charleston. He was appointed a Lieutenant Colonel in the Kanawha County militia and served under the command of Colonel George Clendenin. He and Colonel Clendenin represented Kanawha County in the General Assembly in 1791 (see Boone County history).






Beautiful downtown Clendenin.
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Old 09-15-2009, 04:07 PM   #922
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Barbour Co / Upshur Co Line - Rt 119

Oops - forgot to post the last few photos from my last ride. I'll do that before I continue south.




Historical Marker located on Rt 119 about midway between Philippi and Buckhannon, about 2 - 3 miles east of the junction with Rt 20. Looks like a red paint ball hit on the upper left corner.

For more on Barbour Co : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbour..._West_Virginia






View east entering Barbour Co, heading towards Philippi.




Same Marker, Side #2.

For more on Upshur Co: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upshur_..._West_Virginia




View west on Rt 119, heading towards Buckhannon.
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Old 09-15-2009, 04:14 PM   #923
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Barbour Co / Upshur Co Line - Rt 20

Not too far away from the last Barbour Co / Upshur Co Line Marker. Located on Rt 20 about 2 - 3 miles north of the junction with Rt 119, about 8 miles north of Buckhannon.





Historical Marker located on Rt 20 about 2 - 3 miles north of junction with Rt 119.




View northbound on Rt 20 entering Barbour Co.




Same Marker - Side #2




View southbound on Rt 20 entering Upshur Co.
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Old 09-15-2009, 04:27 PM   #924
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Pinch Reunion - Kanawha Co

OK, all caught up from the previous ride, so let's continue south.


Located in Pinch, about 10 miles northeast of Charleston along Rt 119.

From the WV Div of Culture and History website:

Summer in West Virginia is not complete without its reunions. There are literally hundreds of them across the state during this season, but none is more unique - or older - than the Pinch Reunion. Celebrating its 100th anniversary this August, it is held at Pinch, a quiet community located up the Elk River about 10 miles above Charleston.
While most summer reunions draw together particular family, school, military, or church groups, the Pinch Reunion is a community gathering open to everyone. It features the necessary elements of food, fellowship, and fun important to most successful reunions, but the Pinch Reunion boasts other unusual features, as well, which have made it a magnet for West Virginia political figures, writers, musicians, and community and religious leaders for the past 100 years.
Shortly after the beginning of the 20th century, William W. Wertz, then a young man of 22, and a group of former school classmates decided that they wanted to establish one weekend each year when they could meet and renew old friendships. They hoped that this yearly reunion would raise the religious, educational, and civic standards of the community. The first gathering took place in 1902. In 1905, the Pinch Reunion Association purchased a wooded cove near Pinch called Rockwood Glen to hold their reunions. In 1912, Burton Pierson was given $300 to construct a large pavilion on the site to serve as a permanent home for many of the reunion activities. Mr. Pierson supplied all of the labor and materials. The "Wigwam," as it is known, still stands; its ample stage area and bench seating remain the hub of activity at each reunion.
Over the past century, the Pinch Reunion has seen the advent of the automobile, the airplane, the telephone, woman suffrage, television, penicillin, the hard road, man walking on the moon, and the computer age. It has survived World War I, World War II, the Great Depression, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and Desert Storm. It has honored veterans repeatedly, as recently as last year.
Among the more unique reunion features has been the inclusion of debates held each year on topics of current interest. Some of these have included "That the Pen is Mightier Than the Sword," "That the Right of Suffrage Should Be Extended to Women," "That the Horse is More Useful Than the Automobile," and "That the Hard Road is More Important Than the Railroad."




Historical Marker located on CR47, about 1 mile north of CR 49. Looks like someone took a bite out the bottom of the marker.




Same marker - Side #2




View south on CR 47 - Reunion facilities are to the right.




Good food makes a good reunion. Here, attendees at the Pinch Reunion in Pinch, Kanawha County, prepare to "dig in" at the 1988 gathering. Photograph courtesy of Charleston Newspapers.
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Old 09-16-2009, 03:53 AM   #925
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Fort Scammon - Kanawha Co

Located south of Charleston just across the Kanawha River. From I-64 Exit 58A, follow the ramp around to Rt 119 South. Go about 1/4 mile to the first intersection and turn right on Fort Hill Drive. Immediately turn right again. The first marker is located there. Follow that road another 3/4 mile up a hill and into a residential area. From there, just keep following the streets uphill. The second marker is located at the intersection of Mount View Drive and Sheridan Circle. From there, follow the road up the hill and around to the fort. Best advice - when you get to an intersection, take the street that appears to be going uphill.


Fort Scammon - also know as Camp White or Fort Hill. The site preserves earthenwork battlements that were set up in 1863 in an elliptical pattern. The period of significance during the American Civil War coincides with the period of late summer in 1862 when Confederate artillery fired from the area and the year or so after March 1863 when Union troops fortified the heights.



First Historical Marker located on Ft Hill Drive just off Rt 119. (About 1 mile south of the Kanawha River)




Same Marker - Side #2




From the first marker, continue on this road as it bears to the left and uphill into a residential area. From there, just keep pointing your front wheel uphill.





Second Historical Marker located at the corner of Mount View Drive and Sheridan Circle.




Second Historical Marker - Side #2.




Keep heading uphill - you're almost there. You will be approaching this corner from the street to the right, so it's hard to see the marker until you're almost up on it. Be prepared for a fast U-Turn to the right.




The top! The fort is situated right in the middle of a residential area. In fact, as I'm taking this picture, I'm on the edge of someone's front lawn being growled at by Cujo .



Inside the fort, basically a series of earthen walls about 6-8 feet high with small breaks for entry/exit.




On one end of the fort was a round metal dish (Confederate satellite TV dish??) and an interesting stone marker with the following inscription (see next photo).




I need to do more research on this one. If anyone can help me out, please PM me. I would appreciate it! It looks like the arrow is pointed north. The inscription reads, " US Coast & Geodetic Survey Reference Mark. For information, write to the Director, Washington DC. $250 Fine or Imprisonment for disturbing this mark"

EDIT: 15 Sept 2012 - I received an email from Matt with the following helpful information:

These benchmark disks are the actual points where a surveyor's plumb bob would have hung in the center of the disk (at the cross mark of the arrow.) This particular disk is called a 'reference mark', and the arrow actually points to another disk that is designated the 'station mark'. It is stamped with its unique designation and the year it was monumented, in this case 'FORT 1944' The disks are used as reference points for future surveyors and mapping.
You can find more information from the following link:
http://www.geocaching.com/mark/details.aspx?PID=HX3089 <http://www.geocaching.com/mark/details.aspx?PID=HX3089>

And I have included more detailed information from the NGS website (www.ngs.noaa.gov <http://www.ngs.noaa.gov> ) below. If you are wondering why I am writing you about this - 'Benchmarking' or searching for these disks is a hobby of mine and I stumbled across the picture you took of this one while searching on the internet. Hopefully this information will help you unravel some mystery behind the marker.

Thanks, Matt!
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Old 09-16-2009, 04:24 PM   #926
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Logan Co / Lincoln Co Line - Rt 10

Located about 5 miles west of Chapmanville on Rt 10, near Daisy.




Historical Marker located on Rt 10 at the Logan Co / Lincoln Co line.

For more information on Logan County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logan_C..._West_Virginia




View eastbound on Rt 10 entering Logan County




Same Marker - Side #2.

For more information on Lincoln County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln..._West_Virginia





View westbound on Rt 10 entering Lincoln Co.
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Old 09-16-2009, 04:48 PM   #927
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Chesapeak and Ohio 2755 Steam Locomotive - Logan Co

Located in Chief Logan State Park just north of Logan, about 1 mile off Rt 10.

From SteamLocomotive.com :

The Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad began with the merger of the Virginia Central and the Covington & Ohio Railroads. It later acquired the Chicago, Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad, the Pere Marquette and the B&O. By 1987 when it was taken over by CSX it also had incorporated the Western Maryland Railroad.

During World War II, the C&O turned to the 2-8-4 wheel arrangement to handle the fast freight schedule demanded by the war-time needs. The C & O had watched the development of the 2-8-4 on the Nickel Plate Road and the Pere Marquette through the "Advisory Mechanical Committee" which was common to the four railroads controlled by the Van Sweringens. It based its 2-8-4 design on the NKP and Pere Marquette "Berkshires". However it chose to name them "Kanawhas" after the Kanawha River, which paralleled its main line.
Between 1943 and 1947, the C & O purchased ninety, Class K-4, 2-8-4 "Kanawhas", twenty from the Lima Locomotive Works and seventy from the American Locomotive Company. These locomotives were numbered 2700 through 2789. All of these locomotives had 69" diameter drivers, 26" x 34" cylinders, a 245 psi boiler pressure, they exerted 69,350 pounds of tractive effort and each weighed about 292,500 pounds.
By mid 1952, the C & O had received enough diesels that it began to retire even the "Kanawhas", which still had service time, and by 1957 all were retired. All but the thirteen that were donated to various cities were scrapped by May 1961. The City of Buffalo, NY received number 2701 and placed it on display near the waterfront where vandals wrecked it and it was scrapped. There are twelve surviving C&O 2-8-4 "Kanawha" type locomotives.

#2755 is on display in Chief Logan State Park, Logan, WV. In the late 1970s or early 1980s, 2755 was badly vandalized. The windows were smashed and gauges were destroyed by vandals. Anything that could have been stolen was, or was badly damaged from the vandalism. 2755 was later repainted and the windows were replaced. An enclosure was built for protection. There have been offers in the past to restore the the engine. All offers have so far been rejected.




Historical Marker located in Chief Logan State Park, north of Logan, about 1 mile from entrance. Next to museum.





Same Marker - Side #2.




View of Marker and Locomotive. Probably has more torque than my V-Strom???





View of the road through Chief Logan State Park - Very nice place to visit. Check out the Aracoma Story in the outdoor amphitheatre during the summer.




One million pounds of iron and steel. Wow





Plaque on the fence with more details.
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Old 09-17-2009, 08:03 AM   #928
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Buffalo Creek Disaster - Logan County

Buffalo Creek is located along CR 16 for about 8 miles east of Man (about 15 miles south of Logan). On Feb 26, 1972 at 8:05am, a series of dams at the Pittston Coal Mine burst under the stress of several days of heavy rain. The path of the flooding included the towns of Saunders, Lorado, Craneco, Lundale, Stowe, Crites, Latrobe, Robinette, and Amherstdale. Several other communities were also affected to a lesser degree as the wall of water swept westward towards Man.

Buffalo Creek consists of 3 branches. As part of its strip mining operations, the Buffalo Mining Company, a subsidiary of the Pittston Coal Company, began dumping gob -- mine waste consisting of mine dust, shale, clay, low-quality coal, and other impurities -- into the Middle Fork branch as early as 1957. Buffalo Mining constructed its first gob dam, or impoundment, near the mouth of Middle Fork in 1960. Six years later, it added a second dam, 600 feet upstream. By 1968, the company was dumping more gob another 600 feet upstream. By 1972, this third dam ranged from 45 to 60 feet in height. The dams and coal mine waste had turned Middle Fork into a series of black pools.

In 1967, the U.S. Department of the Interior had warned state officials the Buffalo Creek dams and 29 others throughout West Virginia were unstable and dangerous. The study was conducted in response to a mine dam break in Aberfan, Wales, in 1966, which killed 147, including 116 school children.

In 1967, a break in one of the dams caused slight flooding in the hollow. State officials requested a few minor alterations to the impoundment. In February 1971, Dam No. 3 failed, but Dam No. 2 halted the water. The state cited Pittston for violations but failed to follow up with inspections. Pittston, which had developed a reputation for poor safety practices, was cited for over 5,000 safety violations at its mines nationally in 1971. It challenged each of the violations and paid only $275 of the $1.3 million levied in fines. By 1972, Pittston was the largest independent coal producer in the country and ranked second in the number of fatal and non-fatal accidents.

In the days preceding February 26, 1972, rain fell almost continuously, although experts later claimed this was typical for late winter weather in the area. Buffalo Mining officials, concerned about the condition of the highest dam, measured water levels every two hours the night of the twenty-fifth. Although a Pittston official in the area was alerted to the increasing danger, the residents of the hollow were not informed. The company sent away two deputy sheriffs, who had been dispatched to assist with potential evacuations. Despite the lack of warning from company officials, some residents sensed the danger and moved to higher ground.

Just prior to 8:00 a.m. on February 26, heavy-equipment operator Denny Gibson discovered the water had risen to the crest of the impoundment and the dam was "real soggy." At 8:05 a.m., the dam collapsed. The water obliterated the other two impoundments and approximately 132 million gallons of black waste water rushed through the narrow Buffalo Creek hollow. In a matter of minutes, 125 were dead, 1,100 injured, and over 4,000 left homeless. One thousand cars and trucks were destroyed. The flood demolished 502 houses and 44 mobiles homes and damaged 943 houses and mobile homes. Property damage was estimated at $50 million.

The 15- to 20-foot black wave of water destroyed one town after another. A resident of Amherstdale commented that before the water reached her town, "There was such a cold stillness. There was no words, no dogs, no nothing. It felt like you could reach out and slice the stillness." -- quote from Everything in Its Path, by Kai T. Erikson

Three separate commissions studying the disaster -- federal, state, and citizen -- found that Buffalo Mining had blatantly disregarded standard safety practices. Pittson officials called the flood an "Act of God" and said the dam was simply "incapable of holding the water God poured into it."

A circuit court grand jury failed to return any indictments against Pittston despite apparent violations of state and federal laws. The report by the Citizen's Commission concluded the Buffalo Creek-Pittston Coal Company was guilty of murdering at least 124 men, women and children.

In May 1972, Governor Arch Moore, in the midst of a re-election campaign, proposed 10 redevelopment projects for Buffalo Creek, few of which were completed on time or ever materialized. The federal Department of Housing and Urban Development set up temporary mobile home communities for the homeless. Despite suggestions to recreate a sense of community, residents were separated from their former neighbors.

Of the 750 proposed public housing units, only 17 model homes and 90 apartments were constructed. The model homes were built on an old gob pile near Robinette.

The lawyers for the plaintiffs donated a portion of their legal fees for the construction of a new community center. West Virginia has yet to build the center, though it was promised by Governor Moore in May 1972.

Governor Moore attempted to use the opportunity to execute a 10- year-old plan to construct a super highway through Buffalo Creek hollow into Raleigh County. The flood would have allowed Moore to build the highway entirely with federal disaster funds. The state Department of Highways condemned and purchased hundreds of property lots from survivors. A two-lane road was constructed but the proposed super highway never materialized. In many instances, the state refused to sell property back to its original owners.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' "clean up" of the flood-ravaged area cost $3.7 million. The state of West Virginia negotiated with the federal government until 1988, finally agreeing to repay $9.5 million to cover clean-up costs and a portion of the interest. The state sued Pittston for $100 million, $50 million of which was earmarked to recoup the cost of damages and recovery efforts. Governor Moore negotiated a $1 million settlement just three days prior to leaving office in 1977.

Numerous lawsuits were filed. In the largest class action suit, some 600 survivors and family members of victims sued Pittston for $64 million. They settled out of court for $13.5 million in 1974, with each individual receiving an average of $13,000 after legal costs. (By the way, I did the math on this one and figured each should have received $21,500 - Looks like the lawyers got $8,500 in fees from each victim - (a little over $5 million total ).

Governor Arch Moore - was in office at the time of the disaster and did not rally for a higher settlement. In 1989, he was sent to prison for corruption in connection with the Buffalo Creek Disaster. He was sentenced to five years and ten months in prison. He served over three years before his release. As a result of his conviction, Moore was disbarred and forfeited his state pension. In 1995, he paid a settlement of $750,000 to the state.

For more information and photos, visit the WV Div of Culture and History site:

http://www.wvculture.org/hiStory/buffcreek/bctitle.html


HISTORY CHANNEL DOCUMENTARY ON YOUTUBE - Click Here




Historical Marker located on CR 16 about 1 mile east of Rt 10.




Same marker - Side #2




View east (upstream) along Buffalo Creek. The marker is visible to the right of my bike. The dam was located about 8 miles east of here, and the communities worst affected were up this road about 5-6 miles. I wish I had done my research first - I would have gone up to the original site. I thought Man was the town most-affected. Now I know.




View west on CR 16 entering Man.





This memorial is located on CR 16 about 1/2 mile east of the marker (near Kistler)




Granite Marker at the memorial.
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Old 09-17-2009, 02:34 PM   #929
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Mingo Co / Kentucky - Matewan, Mingo Co

Located on the north side of the Rt 49 bridge from Matewan across the Tug Fork River to Buskirk, Kentucky.

Matewan is a small town, but can fill a large history book (See dlrides' post on Matewan for an excellent report - http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=409503 )

This Historical Marker is easy to miss as it blends in to the bridge in the background. As you pull off Rt 49 into town, it's straight ahead and on the right side just before the bridge. The town is to your left.





View of the Marker for those traveling north across the bridge into WV.

For more on Mingo County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mingo_C..._West_Virginia

Interesting fact - It is the last county formed in WV. (the youngest)






View for those heading south across the Tug Fork into Kentucky.

For more on Kentucky: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky




View southbound looking over into Kentucky. See, the marker (on the right) blends right in to the bridge. Easy to miss is the right light.




View of Matewan from the marker.





Downtown Matewan. The "Matewan Massacre" Marker (posted by GSBS, Post #412) is just to the left about 20 feet out of view.
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Old 09-17-2009, 02:55 PM   #930
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Ohio Extension - Mingo Co

Located between Williamson and Matewan along the Tug Fork River and the border of Kentucky. It was a section of the coal line from Elkhorn WV (located about midway between Welch and Bluefield) and Kenova WV (located on the west end of Huntington).

Best known as the Norfolk and Western Railway, the company was actually organized as the Norfolk and Western Railroad. The company's name changed to the Norfolk and Western Railway, in 1896. It was organized primarily to develop coal, iron and other resources, and especially attracted by the discovery of good coal.

The difficult construction of the Ohio Extension, from Elkhorn to Ironton, Ohio, approximately 195 miles in length, was begun in 1890. The road was opened on November 12, 1892 by the completion of the Hatfield Tunnel, eight miles east of Williamson, WV.

The engineering problems, met and sucessfully solved in accomplishing the strategic purposes of the railway directors, resulting in the opening of vast previously secluded regions to the larger life of the works, were many and complicated. As the earlier problems were solved, subsequent ones arose in the necessity of perfecting the original road to meet the demands of increasing traffic.

In constructing the original line across from Naugatuck on Tug Fork(http://www.wvexp.com/index.php/Tug_Fork_River) to Dingess and down Twelve Pole, the purpose of the management was to locate as near as possible to the Ohio River a coal of good quality which could be easily transported to Kenova (http://www.wvexp.com/index.php/Kenova%2C_West_Virginia), about four miles from Huntington, WV(http://www.wvexp.com/index.php/Hunti..._West_Virginia), for shipment down the Ohio River on barges.




Historical Marker located on Rt 49 about 1 mile south of the Rt 52 junction, and about 4 - 5 miles south of Williamson.




Same Marker - Side #2.





View southbound on Rt 49. The Marker (to the right) is slowly being "eaten" by the surrounding vegetation. Anyone nearby own a Brush-Hog?




View northbound on Rt 49 - again, almost covered up by vegetation.




Part of the N&W line north of the marker as it enters Williamson. Obviously, coal still plays a major part in the local economy.




Another view of Williamson.
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