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Old 03-20-2010, 02:14 PM   #1081
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Miller's Tavern - Brooke Co

OK, I sorta got Bruced on this one, which is OK. Grape Ape posted this one back on Post #555, but for some reason the photo wouldn't show. Well, it suddenly appeared right after my ride. Hmm... At least he did a nice post and photo.

Anyhow - since I was there and got some photos, I thought I'd add them along with a little write-up from the original Nomination Form for the National Register of Historic Places.

Hope you don't mind, GrapeApe.

(Excerpts)

In the late 18th and early 19th Century, taverns were inns and inns were taverns. Miller's Tavern was constructed to accomodate, therefore, travellers who desired refreshment and temporary amenities, or overnight lodging.

... at the date of its construction near the turn of the 19th Century the building was planned as an L. ... a fact betrayed by the well preserved sandstone foundation blocks... in the full basement. At the turn of the 20th Century the space at the rear of the ell on the north side of the building was enclosed to give the building its present rectanguloar shape.

First floor windows have been bricked up or filled with molded glass blocks. These alterations occured for the most part in recent years when the building was used as the headquarters for a fraternal society.

Local tradition ascribes the construction of Miller's Tavern to John Henderson. Henderson died in 1798, so the date of the building may predate his death by several years. (A) Brooke County Courthouse document, dated May 28, 1818, (describes the lot containing) a tavern now in the tenure of William Miller. It seems likely that William Miller leased the inn from Henderson. (It appears) Mrs Miller, following the death of her husband, continued to operate it for a number of years.





Historical Marker located at 6th & Main St in Wellsburg, just across the street from the wharf along the Ohio River.








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Old 03-21-2010, 08:37 PM   #1082
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Hardy County / Grant County

My six month "hiatus" out of the way, it is time to get back into the swing of things and go marker hunting. On Friday, I rode out and met up with our Marker Master, pnoman. We had arranged to meet at a church near his family homestead. We spent some time walking the land that had provided for a number of generations of his family. I feel honored to have had pnoman share with me this history, and if any of you get the opportunity for the tour, by all means do so. I could have spent the entire day there, but, as Mr. Frost once wrote, "I had miles to go before I sleep". So, we headed into Petersburg for a bite and to study the maps and discuss strategy regarding the elusive roadside historical markers that are still out there. The place we ate, Sue's Country Kitchen, has a good burger and friendly service. It appeared to be a favorite of the locals. The food and service was enhanced by the smell of tires and motorcycle leathers, as it shares the building with a multi line motorcycle dealership. For desert, we sniffed, looked, licked and fondled new motorcycles. Then it was time to go marker hunting.

My first assignment on the MIA marker list was the county line marker on RT 55 at the Hardy County / Grant County line between Petersburg and Moorefield. This what I found:





Don't know for sure what happened to it, but it's gone. It's possible that when Zed and Maynard where sighting in the rifles, the marker didn't fare as well as the green sign did. If anyone sees those boys before I do, talk to them about working on tighter groups.
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Old 03-21-2010, 11:24 PM   #1083
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Gen. Joseph Neville / McNeill's Raid

This marker is located on the right when traveling south on Rt 220 / N. Main St., Moorefield, Hardy County. It is tucked in between the Moorefield Elementary School and Summit Bank.

Side one:



McNeill's Rangers were what was known as Partisan Rangers. A partisan is a member of an irregular military force formed to oppose control of an area by a foreign power or by an army of occupation. Basically, they were Guerrilla fighters...Underground Resistance...Someone who uses unconventional military tactics.
Much has been written about the exploits of these Partisan Rangers. A good read on the subject can be found here:
The McNeill Rangers:
A Study in Confederate Guerrilla Warfare

By Simeon Miller Bright



Side two:



Born in Fauquier County Virginia, Gen. Neville was an officer in the Hampshire County Militia, rising to the rank of Brigadier General during the Revolutionary War.

Obituary of General Joseph Neville as published in the Winchester Gazette and copied April 2, 1819 by the Pittsburgh Gazette.

General Joseph Neville: Departed this life on the 4th of March at his seat in Hardy County, Virginia, General Joseph Neville after a short illness in the 85th year of his age. He was an old and respectable citizen of the County of Hardy, universally esteemed; during his long life he filled many offices of high trust and confidence. In the Revolutionary War he bore a zealous and active part in his country's behalf in which he promotes the good cause with all his weight and influence of his character, as well as by advances from his purse when necessary. At the close of the struggle, he was appointed on the part of the state of Virginia, one of the commissioners to run the line between this state and Pennsylvania, and he afterward represented the district in which he lived in the Congress of the United States. At the time of his death he held the commission of Brigadier General of the militia. His heart expanded with benevolence to the whole human race, and his hand was always open to supply the wants of the poor and the needy. "Careless their merits or their faults to scan, his pity gave ere charity began". These celebrated lines of Goldsmith were literally true in his character. He resided during the greatest part of his life on the fertile banks of the South Branch of Potomac, and for a few years previous to his death he resided on his farm in the Allegheny, from whence his body was removed and interred in the family burying ground of Edward Williams, Esq., by the side of his wife, who had departed a few years before him.

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Old 03-22-2010, 06:40 AM   #1084
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FYI, the indian burial grounds marker near Buffalo, WV has been replaced and a previously missing marker "Mark Twain Family" on Rt62 north of Leon is now in place. I will try to get pics this week.
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Old 03-22-2010, 06:53 AM   #1085
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rider_WV
FYI, the indian burial grounds marker near Buffalo, WV has been replaced and a previously missing marker "Mark Twain Family" on Rt62 north of Leon is now in place. I will try to get pics this week.
Thanks!!

There are a lot of the "Missing" markers that are starting to be replaced, so y'all keep you eyes open.
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Old 03-23-2010, 04:05 PM   #1086
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Hughes Ferry / Bridge - Nicholas Co

This was a real case for Shirlock Holmes. First, I looked for this marker twice on my southerly ventures into Nicholas County. The marker was listed as being located at Mile 85. Problem is, the mile markers only go up the mid-60s by the time Rt 19 joins I-79 (in adjacent Braxton Co). Hmm. A quick note to Joe Geiger, who suggested it may be 8.5 (as in Eight-Point-Five) Well, that's quite a bit south of Summersville, but I'll give it a try. I Googled the bridge, and it showed up on the map just south of Summersville. So, as I venture south on New Rt 19, I crossed the Gauley River and went another 3 -4 miles south before turning around (at about Mile 35). There was a sign for "Old Rt 19" off to the right (east) as I started back northbound. What the heck, give it a try. The road looped around east and north in a big circle. Just before it rejoined New Rt 19 (just south of the Gauley River Bridge) - VIOLA! There it is! Must be Mile 38.5. Case closed.


Below is the request for naming the new bridge:

From: http://www.legis.state.wv.us/Bill_Te...r31%20intr.htm





HOUSE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION NO. 31

(By Delegates Shelton, Tucker, Boggs and C. White)

Requesting the Commissioner of the Division of Highways to name the bridge on U.S. Route 19 which crosses the Summersville Lake the "Hughes Bridge."

Whereas, The crossing of Gauley River south of Summersville has carried the geographical name designation of "Hughes Ferry Bridge" for nearly two hundred years, while today U.S. Route 19 crosses the Summersville Lake in nearly the same location where the original ferry operated; and
Whereas, The steel and concrete bridge that currently supports the modern four-lane highway continues to carry the traditional name of Hughes Bridge; and
Whereas, The geographical location where the current bridge crosses the Summersville Lake has a rich historic background in which the name "Hughes" has played a prominent role, namely from the time Edward Hughes obtained the property around the site, at which time a ferry site in nearly the same position as the bridge was designated the "Hughes Ferry"; and
Whereas, Since the days of the "Hughes Ferry" many historical events associated with civil war skirmishes around and about the ferry site, as well as the existence of ferrymen who were from the Hughes family and who served in the armed forces of this country have left the indelible imprint of the tradition of the Hughes family upon the particular landscape and route where the bridge crossing the Summersville Lake carrying U.S. Route 19 lies; therefore, be it
Resolved by the Legislature of West Virginia:
That the commissioner of the West Virginia Division of Highways is hereby requested to designate that certain bridge located in Nicholas County and spanning Summersville Lake on U.S. Route 19, as the "Hughes Bridge"; and, be it
Further Resolved, That the commissioner is requested to have made and be placed, at either end of the bridge, signs identifying the bridge as the "Hughes Bridge."





Historical Marker located on Old Rt 19, about 1/4 mile south of the Hughes Bridge / Gauley River (about 2 miles south of Summersville - appx Mile 39) northbound lane, and about 1/4 mile east from the new 4-lane.




View east on Old Rt 19. Same Marker - Side #2




View westbound on Old Rt 19 just as it joins New Rt 19 ahead (northbound is to the right at the intersection - bridge is to the right 1/4 mile.





Driving north on New Rt 19, this sign just south of the Hughes Bridge / Gauley River directs you to the Old Rt 19. Marker is hard to see, but is just right of center in the dark spot among the trees.



Looking east again from New Rt 19 onto Old Rt 19, the arrow points to the marker. (Note: No, it's not the sign closer to the utility pole)




Back on New Rt 19 northbound, getting ready to cross the Hughes Bridge / Gauley River.



I walked out on the bridge to get this photo of the site of the original Hughes Ferry, while passers-by yelled "Jump!".
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Old 03-24-2010, 06:28 AM   #1087
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another FYI, if anyone wants to grab it the "Woody WIlliams Bridge" marker in barborsville is now in place on Rt 60. Be careful, its a busy busy intersection.
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Old 03-24-2010, 08:20 PM   #1088
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnoman
This was a real case for Shirlock Holmes.
View east on Old Rt 19. Same Marker - Side #2

SNIP


Wish I had a nickle for the many times I've passed this intersection. Been traveling "Old 19" off of Rte. 60, and eventually the new one for close to 44 years. The old 19 was a rip, unless you got behind a Smith's Tranfer truck that seemed to ply that route back in the late '60's and early '70's.
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Old 03-25-2010, 03:31 PM   #1089
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Nicholas Co / Greenbrier Co Line - Rt 39

Located midway between Summersville and Marlinton on Rt 39, about 5 miles east of Richwood. Nice riding - probably more so without the sand/salt/cinders/potholes left over from winter.




Historical Marker located on Rt 39 at Greenbrier Co / Nicholas Co line.

For more information on Greenbrier Co: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenbr..._West_Virginia




View eastbound on Rt 39 entering Greenbrier County.




Same Marker - Side #2

For more information on Nicholas County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nichola..._West_Virginia




View westbound on Rt 39 entering Nicholas County.
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Old 03-25-2010, 04:18 PM   #1090
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Greenbrier Co / Pocahontas Co Line - Rt 39

Located about 5 miles west of the Cranberry Glades area, and about 10 miles west from the the junction with Rt 219. Still lots of snow there when I went through on March 18th.




Historical Marker located on the Greenbrier Co / Pocahontas Co line on Rt 39.

For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenbr..._West_Virginia




View westbound on Rt 39 entering Greenbrier County. Still lots of snow.




Here's a little better view westbound - lots of snow remaining on March 18th.





Same Marker - Side # 2. (Another big attraction in Pocahontas County is Green Bank National Radio Astronomy Observatory)

For more information on Pocahontas County: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocahon..._West_Virginia

For more information on Droop Mt.: http://www.droopmountainbattlefield.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Droop_Mountain

For more information on Cranberry Glades: http://www.pocahontascountywv.com/cranberry_glades.aspx



View eastbound on Rt 39 entering Pocahontas County.
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Old 03-26-2010, 11:44 AM   #1091
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WV Markers / WV Tag-O-Rama Get-Together

WV Historical Markers Riders
WV Tag-O-Rama Riders

vatrader01 has proposed a get-together for the Tag-O-Rama and Historical Markers riders (and lurkers!). Here is a brief tidbit to get your interest.


http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?p=12510864#post12510864

WHERE

Yokums Vacationland Campgrounds, Seneca Rocks, WV.
This is the camp site about half a mile from the Harper Store, not the Princess Snowbird Camp across from the store.

WHEN

Tentative - May 22

FOOD

The Porch Restaurant, a half mile or so up the road from the campground, says it will seat up to 40 inmates, and offer a menu of reasonable fare for under $10.00 a plate. They do handle set-ups. [BYOB]. That should cover Saturday night. Possible joint effort at a campsite breakfast Sunday morning?

SLEEPY TIME OPTIONS

Motel rooms available from $45.00 / night, camping is $6.50 a head, and cabins start at 80 bucks. Beans, Bacon and Beer available on site. Owners suspect the campground will have a low occupancy due to the pre Labor Day date. There is a Pavilion at the campground, should the weather turn on us, and a large bonfire was given the go ahead. Tents may pitch in a group, not much for restrictions. Everything [motel, cabins, restaurant] is walking distance of the campfire.

ACTIVITIES

As far as some motorcycle related activities, we had discussed a trip to Greenbank and the Observatory, and / or a run up to Blackwater State Park. For those who do it in the dirt, the area is an "amusement park for Dual Sports". And we will take advantage of it.

I know this not centrally located. It does have a lot to offer, and works for the folks I've talked to about helping host this. Maybe in the fall, the good people of the south / south east of the Mountain State can reciprocate / retaliate with a throw down that will put this one to shame. There is interest in a fall get together somewhere within striking distance of Charleston, tying the TOR and Historical Marker riders together and possibly getting a history related tour at the Capitol Complex.

There are as many places to meet up at as there are places to tag, and Historical Markers to photograph. And many different dates to do it. This date seems to fit, as shortly there after are graduations, summer vacations, do da, do da. The location offers something for every one.

Like tag, the next one can be were ever you choose.


Please post all replies on that thread so they are all in one place. Thanks!

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=563050
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Old 03-27-2010, 08:17 AM   #1092
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Cranberry Glades - Pocahontas County

Located about 10 miles west of Marlinton.

Notes from the Pocahontas County Website:

The Cranberry Glades is the largest area of bogs, or acidic wetlands, in West Virginia, a unique and exotic ecosystem on 750 acres. This spectacular and beautiful area was established by the United States Forest Service in 1965, to protect and preserve over 60 unique plant species, many of them descended from seeds that took root here over 10,000 years ago.
Whether you are looking at an individual fuchsia-colored Wild Orchid or taking in the beauty of the bog plains, there is a special tranquility found only here.
The Glade’s fascinating sphagnum bogs are similar to that found in “Muskegs” of the Artic Tundra. When you first enter the area, you will notice Red Spruce, hemlock and Yellow Birch trees.
Along the left side of the boardwalk you may see a tree that has fallen over. The shallow roots so necessary for survival here do not adequately anchor trees against strong winds. Thus, the very adaptation which allows these trees to live here can also cause their death.
Carnivorous or insect-eating plants also make their home in the bogs. The half-mile boardwalk was constructed so you can enjoy the area without disturbing this fragile community.
Perched on the edge of Cranberry Mountain in the Monongahela National Forest on Highway 39/55 is the Cranberry Mountain Nature Center. Operated by the USDA Forest Service, the Nature Center features live programs on birds of prey as well as poisonous and nonpoisonous snakes of West Virginia.



Historical Marker located on Rt 39/55 about 1 mile west of the junction with Rt 150, and about 6 miles west of Rt 219. Looks like this marker has seen some rough winters.



Same Marker - Side #2



View westbound on Rt 39/55. You can see why I didn't get a good close-up, straight-on photo of the marker.



View eastbound on Rt 39/55.



The road up to the Cranberry Glades Botanical Area was still not plowed.




Better view of the access road. I think I'll wait a month or so.
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Old 03-27-2010, 09:02 AM   #1093
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Denmar State Hospital - Pocahontas County

Located in Denmar - about 12 miles south of Marlinton, east of Rt 219 on CR 31.

From WV Division of Culture and History website: (Click here for full article and list of those patients buried in the cemetery)

The West Virginia Legislature created the State Colored Tuberculosis Sanitarium in 1917. The Maryland Lumber Company sold 185 acres of land and numerous buildings in Denmar, Pocahontas County, to the West Virginia Board of Control. According to the 1918 West Virginia Legislative Hand Book, black tuberculosis patients, who were West Virginia residents, were eligible for admission to the sanitarium provided they could pay for their care. The Hand Book noted: "The reasonable expenses of poor persons admitted at the request of the authorities of any municipal corporation or county, shall be paid by such municipal corporation or county." The sanitarium admitted its first patients on January 31, 1919.
In 1937 the legislature appropriated funds for a new hospital building at Denmar, which was completed in 1939. By the 1950s, medical science had developed more effective means to diagnose and treat tuberculosis and, in 1957, Denmar was converted to a state hospital for the chronically ill. The hospital closed in 1990 and the legislature appropriated funds for its conversion to the Denmar Correctional Center in 1993.
In 1995 Warden Stephen Yardley and his staff at the Denmar Correctional Center compiled a list of 277 names of sanitarium patients believed to be buried on site. William P. McNeel and members of the Pocahontas County Historical Society scoured the county death records from 1923 to 1946 and made many corrections and additions to the original list. Staff at the West Virginia State Archives conducted a search of the state death records from 1919 to 1946 and discovered several hundred names that did not appear in either hospital or county records. The following lists were compiled from these sources-hospital records, Pocahontas County death records, and state death records. The first records those who are known to be buried at Denmar. The second, taken from county and state records, lists those who died at Denmar but were buried elsewhere or whose burial places are not known. These lists do not represent a verbatim transcription of any of the records used. In some cases, place names have been corrected.
Some interesting patterns emerge from these lists. Many of the patients originally came from the South and may have been part of the Great Migration of blacks to the North in the early twentieth century. While all regions of West Virginia are represented, many of the patients resided in the southern coalfields. This raises questions about poor sanitary conditions in coal towns, which may have contributed to the spread of tuberculosis. The large number of miners at Denmar also raises speculation about the possibility of black lung disease.

*************************

I was trying to be very careful to photograph only the marker since it is now a Correctional Center. When I walked over to ask an employee where the cemetery is located, I was told in no uncertain terms, "You don't want to be mucking around here. This is Federal property." (actual words).

OK, Bye. I did grab one photo earlier as I rode past the center looking for the cemetery. That will have to do.




Historical Marker located in front of the (now) Correctional Center. (This explains the razor wire fence) From Hillsboro on Rt 219, take CR 31 southeast about 5 miles along a narrow and winding road through old farmland. You can't miss it.





Same marker - Side #2





I grabbed this photo quickly so I would not (hopefully) get their attention.




Did I mention the road is narrow and twisty?




Not all of CR 31 is twisty. The first section is very picturesque.
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Old 03-29-2010, 03:10 PM   #1094
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Maxon Sand - Pocahontas Co

Located on Rt 219 just north of the the Greenbrier Co / Pocahontas Co line.

I Googled "Maxon Sand" and found several references to oil/gas production, but nothing that really describes or defines the term. Basically, what is written on the Marker covers it. (Unless you are a geologist and this kind of stuff runs in your veins )




Historical Marker located on Rt 219 southbound lane just north of the Pocahontas Co / Greenbrier Co line. (Also, about 3 miles south of entrance to Droop Mt. Battlefield State Park)




Same marker - Side #2




View northbound on Rt 219.



View southbound on Rt 219. The "road cut" is across the highway to the left.



Closeup of the road cut. Not being a geologist, I can't really tell what it is. Sorry.
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:46 PM   #1095
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnoman
I Googled "Maxon Sand" and found several references to oil/gas production, but nothing that really describes or defines the term. Basically, what is written on the Marker covers it. (Unless you are a geologist and this kind of stuff runs in your veins )
I'm certainly not a geologist, but I was curious about the various "driller" sands referenced in many oil and gas related markers. Maxon, Salt sands, Big Lime, Big Injun, etc... are just the names given to specific layers of the earth's crust. Each has specific qualities in composition and chemical concentrations that differentiate one from another.
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