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Old 12-15-2008, 02:20 PM   #121
tricepilot OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andres A
Te esperamos en Reynosa, cuando regreses a San Antonio

Andres A.
?OK, nos vemos despues del viaje, claro?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdon
Two questions

Which bike you taking in Feb.?

The Beemer

What the heck you doing in the Hospital?
Hope all is well!

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Old 12-17-2008, 08:51 AM   #122
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Guanajuato

We packed up in Patzcuaro on a Wednesday morning, the second week of the trip, and set a vector for Guanajuato.

We re-traced our path through Morelia, slightly different to catch sight of the famous aquaduct:



The aquaduct was working up through 1910 - it's built right in the middle of the street. Or, the street was built around the aquaduct



It has over 250 arches



Guanajuato is, as you remember, part of a "colonial triangle", all three members of which are a "must see" on any trip to this region...



On this RR, I've already taken you to Dolores and San Miguel, now I'm back to another of my favorite cites in all of Mexico...



As I took the shot above, Humphrey Bogart just pulled in with a burro train with Treasure of the Sierra Madre loaded.

Or, maybe it was just coffee...



Honestly don't know if this is a real working burro or if it's part of something staged by the chamber of commerce.

Also, I don't know if this is a burro or a donkey.

The cool thing about Guanajuato are the tunnels carved under, in and around the city:



These are a major (but not the only) way into the city...



Similar in a sense to Real de Catorce - two silver mining cities with tunnels used previously for mining.

I took furious notes on this, as I plan to copy it for my backyard:



I thought it would be great for advrider get-togethers!



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Old 12-17-2008, 10:05 AM   #123
Andres A
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Buen provecho, my seven years old son, ask if you was a really army pilot?

He is a fanatic of the black hawk helicopters.
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Old 12-17-2008, 10:15 AM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andres A
Buen provecho, my seven years old son, ask if you was a really army pilot?
Cerca - pilot de aero-pemex:

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Old 12-17-2008, 10:25 AM   #125
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Fun Food Facts

In spanish,

desayunar means to eat breakfast

almorzar means to eat lunch

cenar means to eat dinner

Consider the english word breakfast: since it's the first meal of the day, you are literally "breaking a fast".....break - fast

Same in spanish.

Consider the spanish word desayunar: ayunar is the verb "to fast", hence, desayunar means, as well, to break the fast, or des-ayunar

When you come across a spanish word with the prefix "des", it often means to undo something

Almorzamos en Guanajuato:

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Old 12-17-2008, 10:39 AM   #126
LaOutbackTrail
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I'd like to make a run down into Mex one day and hit the "colonial triangle". Guanjuato has intrigued me as well as SMA. But, I havent really heard of Dolores Hidalgo before this report.
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Old 12-17-2008, 11:45 AM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LaOutbackTrail
I havent really heard of Dolores Hidalgo before this report.
It's the cradle (cuna) of the revolution. Where the Grito de Delores took place on Sept 16.

Beyond that, I've not seen anything interesting in the town.
TricePilota. I'm sure you'll set us straight/derecho.

Interesting about desayunar. I did not know that. How about bienviendos? = good/well (you) come.
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Old 12-17-2008, 01:16 PM   #128
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Caught back up. Great thread!
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:03 PM   #129
Arte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
We packed up in Patzcuaro on a Wednesday morning, the second week of As I took the shot above, Humphrey Bogart just pulled in with a burro train with Treasure of the Sierra Madre loaded.

Or, maybe it was just coffee...



Honestly don't know if this is a real working burro or if it's part of something staged by the chamber of commerce.

Also, I don't know if this is a burro or a donkey.

The cool thing about Guanajuato are the tunnels carved under, in and around the city:
The burros are carrying "Tierra para las macetas" soil for the flowerpots, which you can get free in the mountain and sell it for some pesos per kilo.

Most of the tunnels were arroyos (water streams) at the time the city was founded due the mining activity. As the town was growing, the bridges became more and more until completely cover the entire path of the small rivers. and people started building their houses over them.

I love Guanajuato, maybe because I did my High school and University there ?

Arte
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:16 PM   #130
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Kc 135

Is that a KC 135 Tanker filling a f-16? I have flown aboard the KC 135 With The Alaska Air National Guard at Eilson Air force Base in Alaska.
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:20 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailblazer
It's the cradle (cuna) of the revolution. Where the Grito de Delores took place on Sept 16...
There is much debate about what the cry or scream actually was. Some have indicated it was a pamphlet. In any case the result was Hidalgo's (who was a Roman Catholic priest) army of indigenous peasants being called into action and defeating peninsular (Spanish) and criollo (Spanish blooded) military cadres and families. Hidalgo (himself a criollo) would be one of many fighting priests that would dot the landscape of history in Latin America. The fighting priest phenomenon continued well into the 1980's and will probably resurrect again within the coming decades, if not earlier. As I mentioned in my last ride report while visiting Cuatrocienegas, when it comes to the priests, it's more about community leadership than what it is about theology.

In looking at the histories of independence in Latin America one can see several trends repeating themselves throughout the centuries. Fighting priests are but one of these trends, which finds its roots as far back as La Reconquista of the Moors in Spain.

Not to be dismissed is that the politcal/historical Central America (sans Panama) was also part of Mexico. It was all part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, and again was part of Mexico under the Mexican Empire of Agustin de Iturbide immdediately after independence. Interestingly, the Mexican states of Veracruz and Chiapas almost became independent Central American countries when the other states ceded. Chiapas of course to this day continues to make news regarding autonomy where a few insurgent priests have also appeared.

I'm glad to see towns like Dolores de Hidalgo being highlighted here. Way to go Bob!
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:43 PM   #132
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windburn
Is that a KC 135 Tanker filling a f-16? I have flown aboard the KC 135 With The Alaska Air National Guard at Eilson Air force Base in Alaska.
Never flew in either, but I did have Spectre looking over my shoulder one night, and I can assure you I was walking taller than the trees.

And speaking of religion/priests, it was a religious experience. Oh yeah!
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Old 12-17-2008, 06:54 PM   #133
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You learn something new everyday

Thanks Trice Pilot for the Spanish lesson and Pedro Navaja for the history lesson. Seriously, I love that stuff.

TP, I took the same picture of the rotisserie when I was in GTO. The food (only chicken) was fan tastic!
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Old 12-18-2008, 05:10 PM   #134
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"Not to be dismissed is that the politcal/historical Central America (sans Panama) was also part of Mexico. It was all part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, and again was part of Mexico under the Mexican Empire of Agustin de Iturbide immdediately after independence. Interestingly, the Mexican states of Veracruz and Chiapas almost became independent Central American countries when the other states ceded. Chiapas of course to this day continues to make news regarding autonomy where a few insurgent priests have also appeared."

There's more than a bit of Mexican chauvinism in the above quote. The Capitanes Generales based in Antigua, Guatemala had at best a tenuous connection with the Viceroyalty of Nueva Espana based in Mexico City. They controlled the territority from Tabasco to Panama independently before there was a Mexico. At about the same time Mexico became independent so did the Central American countries. Chiapas was for a time part of the new country of Guatemala until it changed loyalty as a result of a very suspect election. From Antigua, Guatemala with a Guatemalan wife, Dan
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Old 12-18-2008, 06:57 PM   #135
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Teatro Juárez and the Jardín de la Unión

The prettiest theater on one of the prettiest squares in all of México

The little main square, the Jardin de la Union, is fitted between the cathedral and the Teatro Juarez.

This trio of sites is a slam-dunk jaw dropping spectacle, an other-worldly experience to view



















Look over the roof tops in this shot, you can see how close you are to the cathedral:






The theater, whose construction began in 1872, was inaugurated in 1903 by General Porfirio Diaz, and is the main stage of the International Cervantino Festival, held in Guanajuato in October of each year, and named after Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote.

Some idea of driving through the tunnels of Guanajuato...let the music play while you scan the photos...


&ampampnbsp























600 pesos señor...



OK, for advrider members, 300 pesos, but today only...



No, gracias, quizas una copa de vino tinto...



por supuesto que si.......ya regreso.....

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