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View Results: Front suspension on the camhead GSA - what's the best value, what are the suggestions
Yacugar emulsion shock (compression/rebound and preload adjustments) $615 0 0%
Yacugar fully adjustable piggy back shock (high/low compression, rebound, preload) $1050 3 100.00%
Other suggestions? Please specify 0 0%
Voters: 3. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-28-2014, 06:40 AM   #1
SpeedySteve OP
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Camhead GSA Yacugar front suspension - emulsion or fully adjustable piggyback?

Alrighty folks, time to address the front suspension. I've owned the bike for the past 30k miles. I put a fully adjustable Yacugar piggy back shock on the rear about 15k miles ago. That shock is AMAZING for handling the different terrain and payload scenarios the bike traverses. I have a few springs for it (160, 170 and 190 nm) for different payload scenarios. I commute on it, carve the canyons with it, carve the canyons with her on the back, circumnavigate AZ and venture into surrounding states, beat the snot out of it on the trail (solo or two up), and we've had a few week+ trips 2 up, with camping gear food and water.

Payload scenarios of the bike range. The bike as it sits with 3 jesse bags, aftermarket exhausts, heavy tires (Heidenau and SAVA) and 90% of fuel clocks in at 690lbs. I'm 205 in gear, she's 145 in gear. We'll put 150+ lbs of camping gear, food and water in it and head off. We'll also pack it lightly for small weekend trips.

Needless to say, this has been an amazingly versatile bike for two up riding in all pavement types, and I've become very familiar with the rear fully adjustable shock and have accumulated quite a suspension diary.

Now its time to address the front - I still have ESA. I find the front doesn't bear nearly the weight of a laden GSA nor does adjusting the compression/rebound have nearly as much effect on the ride and handling of the bike.

I feel a basic emulsion shock with a hydraulic preloader would suit our needs, however I wanted to toss this idea up on the forum and get some feedback.

Is the emulsion for the front shock sufficient for the varied amount of riding GS riders typically encounter?

How often do folks actually USE and become familiar with a fully adjustable piggy back shock up front?

Preloading the front - besides to raise the bike offroad, how often are folks actually using front preload?

How easy is a fully adjustable front shock to adjust on the GS bikes? The rear is cake for installing/uninstalling and adjusting.

Looks like the emulsion is ~$615 and the fully adjustable piggy back is nearly $1,050. A hydraulic preloader is a good $200 on top of either of those I believe.

What to do what to do?

Whats the value of the $400 premium of the fully adjustable?

Get the emulsion and keep the wallet fat by a few benjamins? Get the fully adjustable and hope to remember to use it?

No link currently for the emulsion on Ted's BeemerShop website, however this is the fully adjustable piggy back front shock.

Thanks for the poll and feedback folks!
Speedy
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Old 08-28-2014, 12:33 PM   #2
ShaftEd
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Speedy, The Yacugar front Emulsion has preload and rebound. No compression adjustment. I'm sure it would be much better than stock, but I'd go with the fully adjustable S-RS shock. You want the compression adjustment. It's very handy. You don't need hydraulic preload on the front (I don't think it's available on the front anyway). Once the front preload is set, you really don't mess with it much. It's not like the rear where your adding passengers and luggage on a regular basis.
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:49 PM   #3
vintagebob
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Call these guys. They can help you.

http://www.beemershop.com
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:14 PM   #4
Bill-66
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How do you ride the bike..lots of high speed washboard?

The typical 90/10...maybe 80/20?

The only real world gain with any piggy back shock is increased oil capacity...to combat oil foaming/heating..this is only a problem if you are working the shocks, hard..ie, miles of washboard..jumping..etc...

Same idea for compression damping...the ONLY thing compression damping does is resist bottoming..it has little to do with ride quality...low speed damping is for slow shaft speeds..think dips in roads..high speed damping is for high shaft speeds..think running over a board...the sharp jolt causes a quick movement of the shaft..for both..the clickers are there to adjust for bottoming..that's it..(high speed compression can...somewhat, help with how high in the stroke your shock rides...)

Rebound is the magic in your shock...it is responsible for controlling how quickly the shock returns from compression..but also dictates the harshness of your ride and the set your bike takes in corners..


If you aren't seriously running off road with your bike...a piggy back in the front for sure and for some, in the rear..is overkill...like dual shocks on a diesel truck..just there for looks...
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Old 08-29-2014, 08:18 AM   #5
trc.rhubarb
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I bought the emulsion front and went all out on the back. The front has never gotten exactly where I would like it. It's either too soft or too hard and has too much rebound. I know I can have it adjusted and will when its time to rebuild.

I wish I would have spent the extra money.

Love the shocks though.
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Old 08-29-2014, 08:38 AM   #6
erkmania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VEGASGSA View Post
How do you ride the bike..lots of high speed washboard?

The typical 90/10...maybe 80/20?

The only real world gain with any piggy back shock is increased oil capacity...to combat oil foaming/heating..this is only a problem if you are working the shocks, hard..ie, miles of washboard..jumping..etc...

Same idea for compression damping...the ONLY thing compression damping does is resist bottoming..it has little to do with ride quality...low speed damping is for slow shaft speeds..think dips in roads..high speed damping is for high shaft speeds..think running over a board...the sharp jolt causes a quick movement of the shaft..for both..the clickers are there to adjust for bottoming..that's it..(high speed compression can...somewhat, help with how high in the stroke your shock rides...)

Rebound is the magic in your shock...it is responsible for controlling how quickly the shock returns from compression..but also dictates the harshness of your ride and the set your bike takes in corners..


If you aren't seriously running off road with your bike...a piggy back in the front for sure and for some, in the rear..is overkill...like dual shocks on a diesel truck..just there for looks...
You and I are apart on this subject. I completely agree that rebound is the primary adjustment for ride feel and control. But, I am a big fan of adjustable compression and piggybacks on both ends. Once I have the rebound dialed, I look to the compression adjusters to fine tune the ride and overall front/rear balance. In addition, I can use the compression adjusters to account for weight changes as when putting on saddlebags for a road trip. It saves me from having to change springs if my payload is reasonable.

I have Hyperpros on my bike and they are completely adjustable at both ends. The exception is that I don't have hydraulic preload or ride height adjustment on the front shock. I had the ride height adjuster originally, but ditched it because it ate up shock travel. Since the front Hyperpro was a tad shorter than O.E., I just used washers to shim up the front end on the upper mounting stud instead.

Of all the damper adjustments on a motorcycle, I find the rear rebound adjuster to be the most important of all. I suspect that's why the OP has been able to neglect buying a new front shock for so long. But, since he's going to finally upgrade then I would recommend a fully adjustable front shock sans the ride height adjuster. If Ted can get you a hydraulic preload adjuster on the front then I might, just might, consider it to ease changes on the road.
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Old 08-29-2014, 09:46 PM   #7
Bill-66
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We're pretty close..and as I said...compression adjustment will and can affect ride height...

For the majority of riders here..you and I are speaking greek..
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Old 08-30-2014, 07:51 AM   #8
Trekka273
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I was in exactly the same position as you a few months ago. For my '04 R1200GS I had always thought the OE shocks were pretty good until I loaded the bike up for a trial run for a longer trip I was planning. I upgraded the rear to the full SR-S Yacugar rear after spending a lot of time reading different inofrmation on shocks and speaking with Ted ported a number of times. I had no plans to then upgarde the front, however after upgrading the rear it made me realise how harsh the front shock felt as the back was now so much better. I again spent time talking with Ted and I decided to go with the SR-S front shock as well. My main reasoning for this was that I loved the flexibility the same features on the rear gave me and thought that if I got the emulsion version for the front I would be happy with the improvement but I would always have it in the back of my mind that I could adjust it to fit my riding style/preferences. I figured that the small differnece in price was better to pay now rather than not being totally happy with what I had. My dad has always reminded me of the old saying "quality is remembered long after price is forgotten" and I think it is generally a pretty good motto in a lot of cases. I have not regreatted the decision I made for even a second, I love theability it allows me to customise the ride to how I like it, and while I could no doubt get a ride I wouldbe pretty happy with out of the emulsion shock, I like being able to get those few extra percent out of what I have.
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