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Old 03-21-2013, 10:57 AM   #16546
dirtyoffroad
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while not the easiest,but the most accurate way is to cycle the suspension without the shock hooked up.The chain will usually be tightest up around full compression.Set adjusters from that point,connect shock,make note of chain play on stand now and that is where you should always set it.
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Old 03-21-2013, 11:20 AM   #16547
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Originally Posted by ADVSearcher View Post
Some quick clearification wanted regarding chain slack ...


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Originally Posted by crypto666 View Post
Well, it probably doesn't matter that much ...
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Originally Posted by galland1 View Post
I have asked this question about many different bikes. Never received a good answer ...
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Originally Posted by dirtyoffroad View Post
while not the easiest ...

OK ?!? So this is really rocket science

Well, did measure the slack with the bike lifted up, as stated in the manual. Will go for alternative 2, that's the way it's described for my Beamer F800GS (they were crystal clear in that manual ) Thinking it's better with a bit to slack that to tight ... don't want to blow up the chain or destroy the motor sprocket bearing.

Thank's for answering guys !
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Old 03-21-2013, 11:58 AM   #16548
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i find it kinda comical that this conversation comes up, but at the same time, educational. One of the most basic procedures that nobody knows. haha. me either i guess, although my riding partners can hear my chain slapping better than they can hear their own bikes. maybe i need to rethink this.
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:01 PM   #16549
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i find it kinda comical ...
Yepp agrees with you, but perhaps it's concidered that much basic that nobody dares to ask, which --> nobody knows
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:33 PM   #16550
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As mentioned you want to make sure that there is at least some slack when things are compressed. That can mean having your fattest friend sit on it, ratcheting it down, unlinking the shock, etc. Once you verify that you have at least some slack at that point then figure out how much slack you have when on the stand to give that same value compressed. Then you'll never have to go through the compressed check again. I think that a lot of chain issues are caused from over tightening. The first time you hit hard with a tight chain you really stretch it a bunch.

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Old 03-21-2013, 02:09 PM   #16551
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When I bought a new drive this season, I replaced a PD counter sprocket with a Renthal. The Rental fits a lot tighter on the shaft, the PD had more slop than I care for. Others have pointed this out over a year ago on this thread.

I would point out that my PD chain snapped a roller, and Ridefreak is seeing side plates split. Now if we could just get both of those failures in the same batch, that would be one badass chain; God damn thing would explode as soon as you hit the throttle. Imagine the look on peoples faces? "I don't know, its just got a lot of powa!"

Good to know. It's been awhile since I've used PD chains. I might try RK again but hold have my reserves.. The price point is right when they are around 80$ for their X-ring chain.

PD rear sprockets are great. Front ones fit loose on shaft. I wouldn't go that route again.

I might splurge for Ironman next time but I think our conditions will still make quick work of them. Hurts when the drives are 150$ instead of 30-40$. They'd have to last 4 times as long to make them worth it but I'd doubt a sprocket can survive our gritty dirty that long.

I picked up another pumpkin last night... *blush*. Bought my buddies 2011-250XC.
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Old 03-21-2013, 02:14 PM   #16552
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Originally Posted by mitchn06 View Post
i find it kinda comical that this conversation comes up, but at the same time, educational. One of the most basic procedures that nobody knows. haha. me either i guess, although my riding partners can hear my chain slapping better than they can hear their own bikes. maybe i need to rethink this.

You always hear your friends louder then your own. Ride beside a wall or crash barrier and you'll see that you then hear YOURS.

I measure top to top.

I have never confirmed, but most say tightest spot is when chain, swingarm axle, and wheel axle are aligned. That makes sense to my gr 9 geometry... and a few years of engineering. Sliders could come into play though.
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Old 03-21-2013, 02:35 PM   #16553
Cpt. Ron
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Chain slack measurement

For consistency sake, don't change your reference point when taking the measurement. If you refer to the top of the chain, measure to the top of the chain both times. Same for the bottom. Or even the middle of a pin. I don't think the engineers intended for you measuring to different points between slack-up and slack-down.

I would know, I'm an engineer.

And yes, it is supposed to be measured at the tightest point. That's when the countershaft, swingarm pivot and rear axle all in a straight line (about half of the swingarm travel). A partner to compress the bike works. Or a tie down strap under the swingarm and over the seat works too. If you don't change your preload or spring rate, you can do it the "proper way" first to get it correct. Then put the bike on the sidestand on a flat level surface and measure what you have. You can also just lean it against something, really doesn't matter. Just pick an easy position to use to check it in the future. It should be tighter than the full slack measurement, but you don't care. You just need to know the "new" number. Go back to this with every check/adjustment until you change preload or spring rate (or if the bike has luggage on it). I hope this makes sense.

If you're really anal about the proper slack, mark a gauge line with a marker on your swingarm. With the bike in the position you choose and the slack as it's supposed to be, measure the maximum slack away from the middle of the swingarm. This is the length of the slack as measured from the bottom of the swingarm to the chain (top, bottom, middle of pin...whatever you choose) when the chain is pulled down. Draw a line on the swingarm that is the same length as the measurement. This way you don't need to remember the number, it's already measured out for you. Just find a stick on the ground to measure your slack and compare it to your gauge length that you drew on your swingarm. Works great at the end of a tough day when you're exhausted and dehydrated and not thinking quite straight.
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Cpt. Ron screwed with this post 03-22-2013 at 08:07 AM Reason: tightest--loosest, whatever...
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:28 PM   #16554
Ironwood
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Chain Slack

I didn't see it mentioned in this latest discussion so here goes. Rotate the assembly and you will see some variation in the amount of slack from sprockets not being perfectly round. Find the tightest position to measure. It may sound silly but some sprockets can be quite a ways out.
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:52 PM   #16555
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I didn't see it mentioned in this latest discussion so here goes. Rotate the assembly and you will see some variation in the amount of slack from sprockets not being perfectly round. Find the tightest position to measure. It may sound silly but some sprockets can be quite a ways out.
That's what I noticed about Primary Drive rears, the center indexing left a little to be desired, about 1/2" variation in tension. It still works ok but I wasn't impressed, I guess that's what you get for $20.
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Old 03-21-2013, 05:36 PM   #16556
JTucker
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I had a primary drive chain on my pig, I always ran it on the loose side of spec. It broke with only a few hundred miles on it. I won't put another cheap chain on that bike, although I gave it to a friend and it's been on his 250 for a while.
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Old 03-21-2013, 10:00 PM   #16557
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:32 AM   #16558
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I know, its painful.

I don't know if the Iron man stuff offer much advantage other than a few ounces of unsprung weight.

I have had good luck finding the $220+ DID chains for $120 pretty regularly. I pulled last years off, and put on this years chain and sprockets and my adjuster went right back to where they were; no stretch after a year of riding. I guess I replaced another perfectly good chain. I wish they would fit the CRF.

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Originally Posted by Shibby! View Post
Good to know. It's been awhile since I've used PD chains. I might try RK again but hold have my reserves.. The price point is right when they are around 80$ for their X-ring chain.

PD rear sprockets are great. Front ones fit loose on shaft. I wouldn't go that route again.

I might splurge for Ironman next time but I think our conditions will still make quick work of them. Hurts when the drives are 150$ instead of 30-40$. They'd have to last 4 times as long to make them worth it but I'd doubt a sprocket can survive our gritty dirty that long.

I picked up another pumpkin last night... *blush*. Bought my buddies 2011-250XC.
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:36 AM   #16559
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Originally Posted by Cpt. Ron View Post
.

I would know, I'm an engineer.

And yes, it is supposed to be measured at the loosest point..

You mean tightest right?

I like to leave some extra slack in it so when my sleeping bag, sleeping pad, rain jacket, and whatever else get sucked into the rear wheel it doesn't slow me down too much.

Ask Burpsa.
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Old 03-22-2013, 08:06 AM   #16560
Cpt. Ron
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You mean tightest right?

I like to leave some extra slack in it so when my sleeping bag, sleeping pad, rain jacket, and whatever else get sucked into the rear wheel it doesn't slow me down too much.

Ask Burpsa.
Damn it, man!

You are right. Tightest....
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