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Old 12-04-2008, 08:09 PM   #46
bxr140
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Django Loco
it's common knowledge.
And so is the fact that the 337 dry weight on the pre-08 KLR's is way too low. Its WELL documented that the pre-08 KLR is over 400
pounds wet, and ~40-45 pounds less than that dry. Its WELL documented that the 08 KLR is only 15 pounds or so heaver than the pre-08.

Please don't keep passing on wrong information.

bxr140 screwed with this post 12-05-2008 at 01:10 PM
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Old 12-04-2008, 08:50 PM   #47
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Well, I've not weighed a KLR, since my '98 KLR. I had no idea the discrepancy was so great. Did someone weigh the bikes? Do you have a link? Now I know why I struggled in that sand in Baja I spent 6 weeks on the KLR going all over Baja and Mainland Mex back in '98. Couldn't wait to give it back! But a tricked out one is quite impressive and nothing like the stocker I rode.
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Old 12-05-2008, 06:07 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Django Loco
I had no idea the discrepancy was so great.
The manufacturers appear to have no integrity when it comes to reporting the actual weight of the bikes they produce, which is why there is such a large discrepancy between the "dry" weight they report and the actual weight (what the magazines call "wet weight") of the motorycle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Django Loco
Did someone weigh the bikes?
Yes. Several motorcycle magazines actually weigh their test bikes on a scale in a ready-to-ride condition (gas, oil, coolant, battery, etc.) and report those weights.

My information is drawn mostly from Motorcycle Consumer News. They publish a listing of specs each year (horsepower, wet weight, top speed, 0-60 mph, etc.) of all the motorcycles they have tested.
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Trail Boss screwed with this post 12-05-2008 at 06:13 AM
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Old 12-05-2008, 07:14 AM   #49
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Its pretty well documented the 08 is at about 386 and the pre 08 is 13 - 15 lbs less which is 371-373. Apples to apples would be real wet weight minus gas or the same amount of gas in each.
from richards numbers there are 34 lbs between the wet weight of an 08 klr and a bmw 800 gs. This makes about 47 between the pre 08 klr and the 800 gs. now figure there is almost 2 gallons more gas in the klr. At 6.25 lbs X 1.9 gallons thats 11.9 lbs (based on 6.1 gallons klr and 4.2 bmw) that is very close to 60 lbs with the same gas in both bikes or that same 60 lbs wet with no gas. Let me know if any of these assumptions are off.
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Old 12-05-2008, 07:51 AM   #50
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My 2000 KLR weighed 395lbs with a full tank of gas. I would avoid serious off-road riding on a full tank, it made a HUGE difference as to how the bike handled. Even with half a tank, my buddies where stopping for fuel before I would. The KLR was very fuel efficient off-road since the engine just chugs along without needing to rev it. BTW, I think 400lbs is the upper limit of any bike your would want to take off-road.

My 2004 DRZ 400E weighs in at 295lbs with a full tank. For serious trail-riding, I would also run half a tank if it was practical since I could also feel the extra 5L of fuel.

It is easy to see why the DRZ works better off-road.
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Old 12-05-2008, 09:37 AM   #51
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As long as were comparing apples to apples here, let's remember that the intent of the BMW GS (and arguably the KLR) is to allow for a long ride on the slab before heading off onto the dirt. Gelände/Straße, right? Nobody other than the Marquis de Sade would advocate that on a DRZ. And the KLR is no picnic on the Interstate either. You may take more chances off pavement on a KLR, because it would be cheaper to repair. But the limitation would be the size of your wallet, not the capability of the machine.

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Old 12-05-2008, 09:47 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodWorks
As long as were comparing apples to apples here, let's remember that the intent of the BMW GS (and arguably the KLR) is to allow for a long ride on the slab before heading off onto the dirt. Gelände/Straße, right? Nobody other than the Marquis de Sade would advocate that on a DRZ. And the KLR is no picnic on the Interstate either. You may take more chances off pavement on a KLR, because it would be cheaper to repair. But the limitation would be the size of your wallet, not the capability of the machine.
well said!
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Old 12-09-2008, 10:41 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodWorks
As long as were comparing apples to apples here, let's remember that the intent of the BMW GS (and arguably the KLR) is to allow for a long ride on the slab before heading off onto the dirt. Gelände/Straße, right? Nobody other than the Marquis de Sade would advocate that on a DRZ. And the KLR is no picnic on the Interstate either. You may take more chances off pavement on a KLR, because it would be cheaper to repair. But the limitation would be the size of your wallet, not the capability of the machine.

David
+1

Exactly why I bought the GS. Still have the DR-Z for gnarlier stuff and days in the dirt, but the KLR had to go
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Old 12-10-2008, 07:24 AM   #54
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What's the ground clearance for the 800? I had a KLR and really liked it. But the ground clearance was lacking (especially for such a tall bike). Ended up selling the KLR for the Wee-strom and loved that bike (on the street). But I missed the off-road capabilities of the KLR. I think maybe the 800 is the bike for me.
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Old 12-10-2008, 07:15 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard_
Dry weight is a mysterious number that manufacturers seem to use to hide the actual weight of the bike in a ready to ride state.

I've tabulated the wet weights of the different adventure/dual sport from various sources (mostly Motorcycle Consumer News). Wet weight is the actual weight of the bike when you are out riding it (with only a small variance based on the amount of gasoline in your tank).

'08 KLR - 428 lbs (about 13 lbs heavier than pre-08 KLRs)
F800GS - 462 lbs

A real world difference of just 34 lbs.
I received the latest issue of Motorcycle Consumer News today and it has a full test of the F800GS.

Quoting from the article:

"As this was also our first occasion to weigh the new machine, we were eager to see its actual difference versus the larger R1200GS...While BMW quotes 455 lbs. wet for the base machine, our scales noted 490.5 lbs wet, wearing the options of ABS (said to be on the order of 5 lbs), saddlebag mounts and a centerstand. For comparison, the R1200GS tested in Sep 2008 was similarly optioned and weighed 536 lbs."

So, here's the updated wet weight:

2008 KLR650 = 428 lbs
2009 F800GS = 490.5 lbs

A real world difference of 62.5 lbs. Adding a centerstand and saddlebag mounts to a KLR would probably shrink the difference about 10lbs.
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Trail Boss screwed with this post 12-10-2008 at 07:45 PM
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Old 12-12-2008, 11:20 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmex
Riding a KLR 3600 miles is a feat of ironman proportions.

On the trailering comment, the guys with the KLR's and DRZ's just could not bring themselves to pound long stretches of asphalt. On the 12GS or 8GS that would not be a problem at all.
I rode my 2008 KLR 650 solo, 381 miles home (8 hrs.) from a camping trip at the Salton Sea (So. Cal). I had about 125# of camping gear loaded down and I had 40-60 mph gusting cross winds. I ran 60-75 mph GPS all the way. The bike can use more power no doubt, but with Rick's Moab Suspension it handled and rode great. I had no problems whatsoever and plan to do it again next year. You need new ridding buddies if pounding pavement on a KLR 650 is a feat of Iron Man Proportions. Hell, I'm a 55 year old GIRL!
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Old 12-12-2008, 11:36 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 08KLR650 ALICIA
Hell, I'm a 55 year old GIRL!
Hey, it's EASIER if you're a girl. You don't have those things down there.

David
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Old 12-12-2008, 02:30 PM   #58
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Be Nice Now!
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Old 12-12-2008, 03:06 PM   #59
Bucko
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 08KLR650 ALICIA
I rode my 2008 KLR 650 solo, 381 miles home (8 hrs.) from a camping trip at the Salton Sea (So. Cal). I had about 125# of camping gear loaded down and I had 40-60 mph gusting cross winds. I ran 60-75 mph GPS all the way. The bike can use more power no doubt, but with Rick's Moab Suspension it handled and rode great. I had no problems whatsoever and plan to do it again next year. You need new ridding buddies if pounding pavement on a KLR 650 is a feat of Iron Man Proportions.
Folks do all kinds of epic rides on bikes big and small. After owning KLRs for many, many years I wanted something I could pass quickly with, and ride longer distances faster in more comfort. The GS is it. A KL-something with Kawi's 650 twin could have been it, but they won't build it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 08KLR650 ALICIA
Hell, I'm a 55 year old GIRL!
That explains 125# of camping equipment
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Old 12-13-2008, 12:03 AM   #60
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Yep, It Sure Does!
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