ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > GSpot > Parallel Universe
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-24-2012, 03:45 PM   #91
duffs
I have a beard
 
duffs's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Location: Battersea (London) UK
Oddometer: 1,207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Howe View Post
I've got a F800GS and want to use my Navigon GPS on it, however its power supply is of some smaller kind which I'm not too familiar with. I found the plug on the net: ...but I can't actually find a specific name for it, neither can I find a power cable with that plug on it that fits my Navigon. Any ideas or clues on where I can find one or how to solve this? And I do not want to start cutting my other power supply cable as I need that for my car.
Do a search for one of (in no particular order):

- DIN plug motorcycle
- Hella plug
- Powerlet plug

If you're constructing your own plug, the centre is generally positive and outside negative (I believe this is always the case but always best to double check). It might be a good idea to get some shrink tubing as well to seal where the wires come out of the plug.

George
__________________
Ride reports: Europe 2014 | Alps 2013 | Fryslân 2012
2012 F 800 GS Trophy 2014 R 1200 GS TE

Blog: Gelände Straßetastic! Facebook Tumblr
Ride reports, photos, tips, experiences, general twaddle
duffs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2012, 06:34 PM   #92
JRWooden
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: The great state of confusion
Oddometer: 4,262
Maybe this thread helps?
http://www.gpspassion.com/forumsen/t...OPIC_ID=112949

or Powerlet has a cable for darn near everything: http://www.powerlet.com/
JRWooden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 01:43 AM   #93
Howe
Adventurer
 
Howe's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Oddometer: 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by duffs View Post
Do a search for one of (in no particular order):

- DIN plug motorcycle
- Hella plug
- Powerlet plug

If you're constructing your own plug, the centre is generally positive and outside negative (I believe this is always the case but always best to double check). It might be a good idea to get some shrink tubing as well to seal where the wires come out of the plug.

George
Won't be constructing my own plug as the are fairly easy to find, and I don't want to have to buy another power cable to my gps to attach it to. And yeah I eventually realised that they were called "hella plug", found a few on ebay, even in sweden so I guess I'm safe. I think I'll rather buy an adapter than start ripping out the socket on the bike and changing it, however I will give it a peek, it might be easily changed to a "normal" cigarette lighter socket.
Howe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2012, 01:44 AM   #94
Howe
Adventurer
 
Howe's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Oddometer: 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by JRWooden View Post
Maybe this thread helps?
http://www.gpspassion.com/forumsen/t...OPIC_ID=112949

or Powerlet has a cable for darn near everything: http://www.powerlet.com/
Thanks for the link! However Powerlet aren't exactly cheap, found a lot cheaper adapters and plugs.
Howe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 01:19 PM   #95
dante_alighieri
Gnarly Adventurer
 
dante_alighieri's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Spain, mediterrean coast
Oddometer: 179
Great job, thanks !

__________________
F650GS on trail
DRZ400S so!
dante_alighieri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2014, 10:50 PM   #96
Montana Nate
n00b
 
Joined: Feb 2011
Oddometer: 5
First Bike Questions

I am an avid mountain biker, and have had a life-long dream to ride to Alaska on a BMW .... long story. Well, I have the opportunity, time and money to do it next fall so I'm getting ready.

My only experience on motorcycles have been rides on small dirt bikes and some short road rides on a Honda Rebel 450. Both felt comfortable, but I certainly was not challenging those bikes either. I'm 6'2" and about 215lbs, and am strong and in good shape. I am signing up for some local riding courses as well as BMW's own off road riding course. I am looking for advice on my first bike purchase. What I would like to do is to buy a new F800GS, put on all the crash bars and get to learning, as this would be the bike I take to Alaska and I feel I am big and strong enough to "handle" this bike when I eventually drop it. BUT, in my research, I see a lot of people suggesting starting out on something small and cheap, and moving up once you are comfortable. Is this truly needed? I am worried about picking up something small and cheap and then not being able to unload it before my Alaska trip .....

On to my other question specific to the BMW models. My assumption is that the F650gs would be good to learn on, but probably too small for me for an Alaskan adventure. The F800GS looks like a good fit for my size, and my intended trip .... I am confused by the F700GS, same as the 800 but with a lower seat height and slightly less HP? Is that it?

With regard to the Alaska ride, we are looking at pavement and lots of dirt roads, but no desire for anything off-road or too extreme. Beyond the Alaska trip, I see lots of rural dirt road riding in Montana, Idaho and Washington.

Would love to hear any constructive opinions! I am just getting the researching rolling!
Montana Nate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2014, 05:45 AM   #97
Red Bull
Studly Adventurer
 
Red Bull's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2001
Location: Sonoma, CA - USA
Oddometer: 802
Nate I just wanted to assure you that your choice on the BMW 800 GS is exactly what I have chosen for the other (relatively novice) riders for the same Alaska trip. I'm a 1150 GS rider 200,000+ miles (several BMW motorcycles) and have taken my 800 lb (loaded) GSA through most of Central America, USA, Canada etc and even my die hard loyalty to the Boxer twins (Oh I forgot to mention I'm also a BMW motorcycle technician) is swayed to the new parallel twins that are also chain drive. I hope to buy one (800 GS Adventure) before the trip as it's ideal for the bread loaf sized rocky road in the more remote roads in Alaska. I spent a lot of time in Alaska, all the way to Point Barrel but was in 4WD trucks. I had an F 650 Dakar, and it could do the trip but it's too 'buzzy' for weeks and weeks of Hwy / rough roads.
__________________
--- John

John@MyHomeWebSite.com
'97 BMW R1100 GSA "RED BULL" - Sonoma, CA
'Where ever you go, there you are" - Buckaroo Bonzai
Red Bull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2014, 07:06 AM   #98
Defconfunk
I need to get out more
 
Defconfunk's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Ontario, Canada
Oddometer: 224
Post moved to: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...89&postcount=4
__________________
2010 BMW F650GS "Amelia"
2005 Suzuki SV-650N "Belle" [sold]
2003 Kawasaki ZZR-250 "Socks" [sold]
Bruised and Battered, but Smiling and Victorious. - Me
Pictures

Defconfunk screwed with this post 09-11-2014 at 07:52 AM
Defconfunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2015, 02:56 PM   #99
MTrider16
Ridin' in MT
 
MTrider16's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Location: Eastern Montana
Oddometer: 1,722
Quote:
Originally Posted by MENACE View Post
Hi i have f800gs head and park lights not working i have checked bulbs etc still no light any idea?
Menace, I would post up in one of the head light threads or maybe the main thread if you can take some flack. Also is this is a new, used, or nicely aged F8GS?

I'm not too experienced with this problem. Some items I would check:

1. Batt voltage. I think I've heard that the Canbus will cut out the headlights if the voltage isn't high enough to keep the batt charged. Not sure but is easy to check the batt voltage.

2. Fuses. Fuse location should be in op manual.

3. PO wiring or and aftermarket add ons that could be causing shorts or breaks in power.

4. Connectors - take of panels and then un-plug and plug in connectors. Maybe the PO drove across the Uyuni Salar in Bolivia.

5. Trace wiring and look for breaks or problems with insulation.
__________________
'13 VFR1200D, '13 XVS950, '09 F800GS, 07 CRF250X
Riding roads in Montana - Big Sky Country
www.mtrider16.smugmug.com
Mountains, Moose, and Miles: a Montanan's Alcan Highway Story
Continental Divide and More: the "No Dust" Tour of WY and MT
MTrider16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2015, 06:13 PM   #100
MotoLifeChallenge
Future Traveler
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Location: PA
Oddometer: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Nate View Post
I am an avid mountain biker, and have had a life-long dream to ride to Alaska on a BMW .... long story. Well, I have the opportunity, time and money to do it next fall so I'm getting ready.

My only experience on motorcycles have been rides on small dirt bikes and some short road rides on a Honda Rebel 450. Both felt comfortable, but I certainly was not challenging those bikes either. I'm 6'2" and about 215lbs, and am strong and in good shape. I am signing up for some local riding courses as well as BMW's own off road riding course. I am looking for advice on my first bike purchase. What I would like to do is to buy a new F800GS, put on all the crash bars and get to learning, as this would be the bike I take to Alaska and I feel I am big and strong enough to "handle" this bike when I eventually drop it. BUT, in my research, I see a lot of people suggesting starting out on something small and cheap, and moving up once you are comfortable. Is this truly needed? I am worried about picking up something small and cheap and then not being able to unload it before my Alaska trip .....

On to my other question specific to the BMW models. My assumption is that the F650gs would be good to learn on, but probably too small for me for an Alaskan adventure. The F800GS looks like a good fit for my size, and my intended trip .... I am confused by the F700GS, same as the 800 but with a lower seat height and slightly less HP? Is that it?

With regard to the Alaska ride, we are looking at pavement and lots of dirt roads, but no desire for anything off-road or too extreme. Beyond the Alaska trip, I see lots of rural dirt road riding in Montana, Idaho and Washington.

Would love to hear any constructive opinions! I am just getting the researching rolling!
Nate I’ve been asking myself the same questions. There are a lot of ride reports and blogs touting the virtues of smaller/lighter bikes. I have a Yamaha 650 cruiser and it feels under powered for me.



The BMW course is a good idea, I plan on going to Rawhyde next year (recovering from a non-motorcycle accident).



I’ve done a lot of research and I’ve narrowed my options down to the 800GS and the DR650. The Suzuki is attractive because it’s half the price and there are plenty of used bikes available. On the other hand it doesn’t look as comfortable as the 800GS. Also I think I like the bells and whistles on the BMW. Yes it costs twice as much, but I think I am a BMW guy. I won’t truly know until I get on both and try them, something I want to do as soon as I can.
MotoLifeChallenge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2015, 05:24 PM   #101
skiandbike4fun
Adventurer
 
skiandbike4fun's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Truckee, CA
Oddometer: 30
Fuel Filter?

Ok, I've scoured for weeks now trying to find mention of the situation with the fuel filter? It's supposedly in the tank, right? Sooooo how do you clean it/change it on the fly? Once it leaves the tank it's pressurized, so should I put a high pressure one in, or has no one had any issues, even when faced with questionable gas? I apologize in advance if I missed something obvious!

There is no such thing as stupid questions, only stupid people!!!
__________________
Go Big or Go Home
Going faster usually means less work
skiandbike4fun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2015, 05:05 AM   #102
XT Traveler
Gnarly Adventurer
 
XT Traveler's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: Ohio
Oddometer: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiandbike4fun View Post
Ok, I've scoured for weeks now trying to find mention of the situation with the fuel filter? It's supposedly in the tank, right? Sooooo how do you clean it/change it on the fly? Once it leaves the tank it's pressurized, so should I put a high pressure one in, or has no one had any issues, even when faced with questionable gas? I apologize in advance if I missed something obvious!

There is no such thing as stupid questions, only stupid people!!!


If you google search "BMW F800GS Fuel Filter Change" you can find numerous references. Here's a quick one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSruAnWvh2g
__________________
XT Traveler -- "Lost Again On Purpose"

Current Stable: Moto Guzzi Stelvio NTX, BMW F800GS, Yamaha MT-01,
Triumph Thruxton, Triumph Scrambler, Suzuki DRZ400S, Ducati Pantah 500
XT Traveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2015, 01:56 PM   #103
jallenb
taking the backroads
 
jallenb's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Greenwood, IN
Oddometer: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Nate View Post
I am an avid mountain biker, and have had a life-long dream to ride to Alaska on a BMW .... long story. Well, I have the opportunity, time and money to do it next fall so I'm getting ready.

My only experience on motorcycles have been rides on small dirt bikes and some short road rides on a Honda Rebel 450. Both felt comfortable, but I certainly was not challenging those bikes either. I'm 6'2" and about 215lbs, and am strong and in good shape. I am signing up for some local riding courses as well as BMW's own off road riding course. I am looking for advice on my first bike purchase. What I would like to do is to buy a new F800GS, put on all the crash bars and get to learning, as this would be the bike I take to Alaska and I feel I am big and strong enough to "handle" this bike when I eventually drop it. BUT, in my research, I see a lot of people suggesting starting out on something small and cheap, and moving up once you are comfortable. Is this truly needed? I am worried about picking up something small and cheap and then not being able to unload it before my Alaska trip .....

On to my other question specific to the BMW models. My assumption is that the F650gs would be good to learn on, but probably too small for me for an Alaskan adventure. The F800GS looks like a good fit for my size, and my intended trip .... I am confused by the F700GS, same as the 800 but with a lower seat height and slightly less HP? Is that it?

With regard to the Alaska ride, we are looking at pavement and lots of dirt roads, but no desire for anything off-road or too extreme. Beyond the Alaska trip, I see lots of rural dirt road riding in Montana, Idaho and Washington.

Would love to hear any constructive opinions! I am just getting the researching rolling!
Hi Nate,

I was in the same boat 3 years ago before I bought my 2010 F800GS 30th anniv. ed. At the time, I had similar riding experience and never had a MC endorsement. I spent the weekend at one of the local MSF safety courses to bring myself up to speed and I was ready. When I went out to purchase, I had my mind set on the F650GS until my 6'6" 250lb. frame sat on one. Needless to say, it looked and felt a bit goofy.

I highly recommend the F800. I love the bike. And although I haven't gone on any Alaskan super adventures, I can assure you the bike is up to the task. Be ready to buy more than just crash bars. You'll need a seat that you can tolerate for more than an hour, a windscreen to keep the wind off your neck, and luggage for all the necessities...
__________________
Jason
jallenb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2015, 01:52 PM   #104
InTheMuck
So it goes...
 
InTheMuck's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2012
Location: Amongst the has beens & the addicts (Verona, WI)
Oddometer: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Nate View Post
I am an avid mountain biker, and have had a life-long dream to ride to Alaska on a BMW .... long story. Well, I have the opportunity, time and money to do it next fall so I'm getting ready.

My only experience on motorcycles have been rides on small dirt bikes and some short road rides on a Honda Rebel 450. Both felt comfortable, but I certainly was not challenging those bikes either. I'm 6'2" and about 215lbs, and am strong and in good shape. I am signing up for some local riding courses as well as BMW's own off road riding course. I am looking for advice on my first bike purchase. What I would like to do is to buy a new F800GS, put on all the crash bars and get to learning, as this would be the bike I take to Alaska and I feel I am big and strong enough to "handle" this bike when I eventually drop it. BUT, in my research, I see a lot of people suggesting starting out on something small and cheap, and moving up once you are comfortable. Is this truly needed? I am worried about picking up something small and cheap and then not being able to unload it before my Alaska trip .....

On to my other question specific to the BMW models. My assumption is that the F650gs would be good to learn on, but probably too small for me for an Alaskan adventure. The F800GS looks like a good fit for my size, and my intended trip .... I am confused by the F700GS, same as the 800 but with a lower seat height and slightly less HP? Is that it?

With regard to the Alaska ride, we are looking at pavement and lots of dirt roads, but no desire for anything off-road or too extreme. Beyond the Alaska trip, I see lots of rural dirt road riding in Montana, Idaho and Washington.

Would love to hear any constructive opinions! I am just getting the researching rolling!
Hey Nate…

I think you would be fine starting out with a F800GS if that is what you ultimately want to ride when you go to Alaska. I started out on dirt bikes but stopped riding when I was young and then I started riding again on street bikes when I was older. I made the switch from a Harley Road King to a F800GS a couple years back and absolutely love it! I hadn’t ridden off road in over 30 years, and the GS was what I re-learned on. It isn’t light by any means, but it rides much lighter than it is and is quite capable offroad. If you drop it though, it is a load to get back up. I am 6’0” 180 lbs and find that it suits me very well. I have taken it on several trips, including the COBDR last year, and it handles everything except really tight technical stuff. As jallenb mentioned though...there is a fair amount of farkeling you can do to make it more worthy. I've added a Sargent seat, windshield extension, different tires, racks & cases, protection, etc.

We had a friend with us on the BDR that was similar to you in that he was an experienced mountain biker, but hadn't done a lot of motorcycle riding. He picked up an older KLR 650 that is a little smaller/lighter than the newer ones (the green one in the photo below…compared to the red one which is newer) and rode it around a little before the trip, but not much. He did absolutely great on the BDR! I think the bike being lighter helped him when we were offroad, but he is also smaller than you. One downside of that bike was that it couldn't always keep up when we were trying to make time on pavement.



The BMW models are very confusing to be sure! It took me a while to figure out the difference between the thumpers (singles) and big bikes (twins) back when I was looking. This section from Wikipedia does an ok job of explaining it…

“The F650GS and F800GS were launched in 2008, and use the same 798 cc parallel-twin engine with chain drive, but with different power outputs and equipment levels. The F700GS was launched in 2012 to replace the F650GS, which was discontinued. The F800GSA was introduced in 2013 and added a larger fuel tank (24 L), as well as a larger front fairing and windshield.

The F650GS name can cause confusion as it was also used for a 652 cc BMW bike fitted with a single-cylinder Rotax engine, produced from 2000–2007, a bike which was re-launched in 2009 as the G650GS fitted with a Chinese-manufactured engine of the same 652 cc capacity. The parallel-twin engine was first used in the F800S,[1] and is also used in the F800GT, F800R and F800ST, although these bikes are tuned to deliver peak power at a different RPM from the GS models. On the GS models the engine is angled further backwards to provide longer suspension travel, needed for offroad use.”


A friend of mine bought a ’12 F650GS (twin) the same time that I bought my 800. It sat lower which he needed due to his being vertically challenged. He put crashbars, knobbies, etc on it, but the suspension, brakes, and horsepower weren't as nice for offroading. On the road, it was a fine machine. I don't think there would be an advantage for you in getting a F650GS twin vs. a F800GS to learn on...both are heavy and the 800 is set up better. A 650 single would be lighter and might have some advantages that way.

My friend sold his 650 twin to a guy from Alaska and now rides a Honda CRF250L…very different! Maybe it isn’t just a coincidence, but I recently picked up a Yamaha WR250R to ride dual sport events, single track, etc. I may be forced to part with one or the other and am leaning towards keeping the WR since I have “experienced” the GS for a few years now and would like to try something new. I too have dreams of an Alaskan trip though, and think the GS is the better mount for that trip…so we shall see!

Good luck and have fun with your search!
__________________
2010 BMW F800GS
2008 Yamaha WR250R

“I haven’t been everywhere, but it’s on my list."
InTheMuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 10:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2015